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Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li

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Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that lie buried beneath the surface layers of old paintings. They claim, for example, that additional mountainous scenery once appeared in Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, which was later painted over. Skeptics reply to these claims, however, that X-ray examinations of the Mona Lisa do not show hidden mountains.

Which of the following, if true, would tend most to weaken the force of the skeptics’ objections?


(A) There is no written or anecdotal record that Leonardo da Vinci ever painted over major areas of his Mona Lisa.

(B) Painters of da Vinci’s time commonly created images of mountainous scenery in the backgrounds of portraits like the Mona Lisa.

(C) No one knows for certain what parts of the Mona Lisa may have been painted by da Vinci’s assistants rather than by da Vinci himself.

(D) Infrared photography of the Mona Lisa has revealed no trace of hidden mountainous scenery.

(E) Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting’s surface layers.

Originally posted by asthanap on 19 Mar 2009, 04:47.
Last edited by Bunuel on 31 Aug 2018, 04:35, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2009, 09:01
asthanap wrote:
In this case, I could reach to B & E but could not take it further to reach to correct answer.

Please advise.

Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that lie buried beneath the surface layers of old paintings. They claim, for example, that additional mountainous scenery once appeared in Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, which was later painted over. Skeptics reply to these claims, however, that X-ray examinations of the Mona Lisa do not show hidden mountains.
Which of the following, if true, would tend most to weaken the force of the skeptics’ objections?
(A) There is no written or anecdotal record that Leonardo da Vinci ever painted over major areas of his Mona Lisa.
(B) Painters of da Vinci’s time commonly created images of mountainous scenery in the backgrounds of portraits like the Mona Lisa.
(C) No one knows for certain what parts of the Mona Lisa may have been painted by da Vinci’s assistants rather than by da Vinci himself.
(D) Infrared photography of the Mona Lisa has revealed no trace of hidden mountainous scenery.
(E) Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting’s surface layers.


I would go with E. you need to weaken the skeptic's objection. Since the skeptic's objection is about the x-ray analysis, the correct answer should be related to why x-ray analysis is not enough or is not reliable.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2009, 04:41
Pls do not quote the narrowed choices in ur answer as u will get biased answers.

Now coming to the question, i think it shld be E bcos we need to attck the skeptic's objection. the skeptic claims that X-ray examinations of ML do not show hidden mountains. However, if as E says, Analysis relying on X-rays has limited capabilities then it is quite possible that the X-ray is not able to detect the mountain scenary. B though a close one does not adhere to the skeptic's objection abt the X-Ray.
asthanap wrote:
In this case, I could reach to B & E but could not take it further to reach to correct answer.

Please advise.

Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that lie buried beneath the surface layers of old paintings. They claim, for example, that additional mountainous scenery once appeared in Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, which was later painted over. Skeptics reply to these claims, however, that X-ray examinations of the Mona Lisa do not show hidden mountains.
Which of the following, if true, would tend most to weaken the force of the skeptics’ objections?
(A) There is no written or anecdotal record that Leonardo da Vinci ever painted over major areas of his Mona Lisa.
(B) Painters of da Vinci’s time commonly created images of mountainous scenery in the backgrounds of portraits like the Mona Lisa.
(C) No one knows for certain what parts of the Mona Lisa may have been painted by da Vinci’s assistants rather than by da Vinci himself.
(D) Infrared photography of the Mona Lisa has revealed no trace of hidden mountainous scenery.
(E) Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting’s surface layers.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2009, 05:08
Will follow this rule in future. Thanks for your suggestion.

Now back to CR - I think somehow I analysed skeptic claim in wrong manner. I took it as evidence and I read somewhere - "any choice that raise questions the evidence can not be correct".

I guess it could be word X-Ray that took away the attention as same word was used to explain the point: Never question evidence

ritula wrote:
Pls do not quote the narrowed choices in ur answer as u will get biased answers.

Now coming to the question, i think it shld be E bcos we need to attck the skeptic's objection. the skeptic claims that X-ray examinations of ML do not show hidden mountains. However, if as E says, Analysis relying on X-rays has limited capabilities then it is quite possible that the X-ray is not able to detect the mountain scenary. B though a close one does not adhere to the skeptic's objection abt the X-Ray.
asthanap wrote:
In this case, I could reach to B & E but could not take it further to reach to correct answer.

Please advise.

Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that lie buried beneath the surface layers of old paintings. They claim, for example, that additional mountainous scenery once appeared in Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, which was later painted over. Skeptics reply to these claims, however, that X-ray examinations of the Mona Lisa do not show hidden mountains.
Which of the following, if true, would tend most to weaken the force of the skeptics’ objections?
(A) There is no written or anecdotal record that Leonardo da Vinci ever painted over major areas of his Mona Lisa.
(B) Painters of da Vinci’s time commonly created images of mountainous scenery in the backgrounds of portraits like the Mona Lisa.
(C) No one knows for certain what parts of the Mona Lisa may have been painted by da Vinci’s assistants rather than by da Vinci himself.
(D) Infrared photography of the Mona Lisa has revealed no trace of hidden mountainous scenery.
(E) Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting’s surface layers.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2010, 19:20
Since Skeptics are replying based on the X-ray examinations. To weaken this passage we need to shoe the limitations of X-ray examinations. E clearly shows the same, therefore, E is the answer.

BTW...what is the OA?
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2010, 15:25
I would go with E.

A. If there are no records available, then indeed the sceptics could use this fact to strengthen their argument that Leonardo didn't paint any mountains. and since there are no records, who knows for sure. NOPE
B. B says that it is "common" for painters to paint mountains. this doesn't make it so that Leonardo did. it was just something that was done customarily. No proof here. NOPE
C. If no one knows which parts were painted between Leonardo and his assistant, it would be difficult in figuring out who painted what part. indeed, its possible that a mountain has been painted. but, again, there is no proof of such. NOPE
D. this just completely strengthens the argument.
E. This is the only one that attacks the "x-ray" argument being made and shows the possible limitations of using the x-ray on the Mona Lisa.

on another note:
"mona lisa/can i get a date on friday/and if your busy, i wouldn't mind taking saturday-ay-ay-ay-ay-ay"
Kudos to anyone who remembers/knows that song. lol.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2010, 04:50
E...IMO

Since the choice E directly attacks the premise on which the Skeptics' claim is based....

While B is superficial ...it relies on experience all right but it does not give you anything substantial to attack the skeptics' claim.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2010, 09:20
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Here the skeptics are stating that X-rays show no mountainous views.
This objection needs to be weakened. E is the only stmt that weakens X-rays. (I've used simple english)
IMO:
(E) Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting’s surface layers.

B) Painters of da Vinci’s time commonly created images of mountainous scenery in the backgrounds of portraits like the Mona Lisa - This stmt does not weaken the X-ray equipment. It only "strenghtens" the first claim of the question.

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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2010, 22:23
(E) Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting’s surface layers.

Modifier problem here. Its saying that analysis that relies on x-rays only can detect lead-based white pigments. Ok so what else can it detect?

I would have chosen E if it said
Analysis relying on X-rays has the capacity to only detect lead-based white pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting’s surface layers.

Stupid question.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2010, 23:54
the skeptics talks about the x-ray examination .
TO weaken the the skeptics objection we need to choose an answer that is related to x-ray.
Only E talks about that.

So E is my ans.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2010, 18:56
I immediately thought there is something wrong with the x-ray when reading the question. The inappropriate use of x-ray or the inefficiency of it should directly weaken the skeptics' claim.

E seems to be the obvious answer here.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2013, 15:11
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avohden wrote:
Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that lie buried
beneath the surface layers of old paintings. They claim, for example, that
additional mountainous scenery once appeared in Leonardo da Vinci's Mona
Lisa, which was later painted over. Skeptics reply to these claims, however,
that X-ray examinations of the Mona Lisa do not show hidden mountains.

Which of the following, if true, would tend most to weaken the force of the
skeptics' objections?

A. There is no written or anecdotal record that Leonardo da Vinci ever painted
over major areas of his Mona Lisa.

B. Painters of da Vinci's time commonly created images of mountainous scenery
in the backgrounds of portraits like the Mona Lisa

C. No one knows for certain what parts of the Mona Lisa may have been painted
by da Vinci's assistants rather than by da Vinci himself.

D. Infrared photography of the Mona Lisa has revealed no trace of hidden mountainous scenery.

E. Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white
pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting's surface layers.


Source: Litesee | OE is not available.


I believe that the answer is E because the X-ray may not detect other non-lead based colored pigments that could have been used to paint the mountains behind mona lisa
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Dec 2013, 06:15
I feel B is also convincing. Even it weakens the skeptic's objections that X-ray examinations of the Mona Lisa do not show hidden mountains.

I do not trust choice E completely as we are not sure of the kind of colored pigments used to paint the mountains behind mona lisa. If lead-based white pigments had been used, then skeptic's objections would have been more strong.

Any help?
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Dec 2013, 06:27
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cssk wrote:
I feel B is also convincing. Even it weakens the skeptic's objections that X-ray examinations of the Mona Lisa do not show hidden mountains.

I do not trust choice E completely as we are not sure of the kind of colored pigments used to paint the mountains behind mona lisa. If lead-based white pigments had been used, then skeptic's objections would have been more strong.

Any help?



How B is the possible explanation ?? is clearly impossible.

The objection talks about X-ray that sheds no light on something: in this case the same Xray says that under the surface of the painting there is nothing.........

E weakens this conclusion saying that: Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting's surface layers.

From this we certainly know that X-rays in this case do something more than that skeptics sustaine or assert

B says that other painters other than Vinci depicted scenarios using the same landscape of Monna Lisa's (or something, is not so important). Is completely far aways bur really miles away from the correct answer.

Hope this helps
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2016, 01:20
E fro sure
E. Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white
pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting's surface layers.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Feb 2017, 08:39
asthanap wrote:
In this case, I could reach to B & E but could not take it further to reach to correct answer.


Please advise.

Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that lie buried beneath the surface layers of old paintings. They claim, for example, that additional mountainous scenery once appeared in Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, which was later painted over. Skeptics reply to these claims, however, that X-ray examinations of the Mona Lisa do not show hidden mountains.
Which of the following, if true, would tend most to weaken the force of the skeptics’ objections?


I put your doubts in a spoiler, not to spoil the process of solving the question for other members of the forum.

My approach:
Skeptics say that X-ray do not show hidden mountains -> we need to weaken this statement.
we can do so by proving that X-ray is not a good technique to analyze paintings

E states that X-ray detects lead-based white pigments, but what if the underneath layers are not painted with lead-based paint? Clearly it weakens the argument!

E it is.

let's see how others do not weaken the argument:
(A) There is no written or anecdotal record that Leonardo da Vinci ever painted over major areas of his Mona Lisa.
so what? maybe no one knew about that? moreover, it rather strengthens the argument than weaken.

(B) Painters of da Vinci’s time commonly created images of mountainous scenery in the backgrounds of portraits like the Mona Lisa.
but that does not mean that da Vinci did the same...he's very well known for not BEING like everyone else!

(C) No one knows for certain what parts of the Mona Lisa may have been painted by da Vinci’s assistants rather than by da Vinci himself.
this one is out of scope - as it talks about possibility that Mona Lisa might have been painted by da Vinci's assistants - nothing relevant to our argument

(D) Infrared photography of the Mona Lisa has revealed no trace of hidden mountainous scenery.
Infrared testing is out of scope here.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Nov 2017, 01:03
The question is not hard, but closed to a gmat-like question. E is the answer b/c E directly links with the argument.
Nevertheless, such question is from an unreliable source, test takers can skip this question while practising GMAT.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Nov 2017, 01:16
avohden wrote:
Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that lie buried
beneath the surface layers of old paintings. They claim, for example, that
additional mountainous scenery once appeared in Leonardo da Vinci's Mona
Lisa, which was later painted over. Skeptics reply to these claims, however,
that X-ray examinations of the Mona Lisa do not show hidden mountains.

Which of the following, if true, would tend most to weaken the force of the
skeptics' objections?

A. There is no written or anecdotal record that Leonardo da Vinci ever painted
over major areas of his Mona Lisa.

B. Painters of da Vinci's time commonly created images of mountainous scenery
in the backgrounds of portraits like the Mona Lisa

C. No one knows for certain what parts of the Mona Lisa may have been painted
by da Vinci's assistants rather than by da Vinci himself.

D. Infrared photography of the Mona Lisa has revealed no trace of hidden mountainous scenery.

E. Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white
pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting's surface layers.


Source: Litesee | OE is not available.



Argument: X-ray analysis didn't find anything --> no hidden mountain.
Logic: X-ray analysis can measure everything.
Diagnosis: To break this argument we want to know if there is something that can go undetected by X-rays.
Solution: Option E -Analysis relying on X-rays only has the capacity to detect lead-based white pigments in layers of paint beneath a painting's surface layers - provides us with what we need i.e., the limitations of an X-ray analysis.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jan 2018, 01:56
We need to weaken the skeptic's statement. Since the skeptic's statement is about the x-ray analysis, the correct answer should be related to why x-ray analysis is not reliable. E it is.
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Re: Using computer techniques, researchers analyze layers of paint that li &nbs [#permalink] 06 Jan 2018, 01:56
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