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V30-04

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V30-04  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Apr 2018, 06:12
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

45% (01:26) correct 55% (01:31) wrong based on 11 sessions

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The existence of West Berlin, a conspicuously capitalist city deep within communist East Germany, "stuck like a bone in the Soviet throat," as Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev put it. The Russians began maneuvering to drive the United States, Britain and France out of the city for good. In 1948, a Soviet blockade of West Berlin aimed to starve the western Allies out of the city. Instead of retreating, however, the United States and its allies supplied their sectors of the city from the air. This effort, known as the Berlin Airlift, lasted for more than a year and delivered more than 2.3 million tons of food, fuel and other goods to West Berlin. The Soviets called off the blockade in 1949. After a decade of relative calm, tensions flared again in 1958. For the next three years, the Soviets emboldened by the successful launch of the Sputnik satellite the year before and embarrassed by the seemingly endless flow of refugees from east to west (nearly 3 million in the decade since the end of the blockade, many of them young skilled workers such as doctors, teachers and engineers) blustered and made threats, while the Allies resisted. Summits, conferences and other negotiations came and went without resolution. Meanwhile, the flood of refugees continued. In June 1961, some 19,000 people left the GDR through Berlin. The following month, 30,000 fled. In the first 11 days of August, 16,000 East Germans crossed the border into West Berlin, and on August 12 some 2,400 followed the largest number of defectors ever to leave East Germany in a single day.

All of the following measures failed to stop migration from East Germany EXCEPT

A. the Soviet blockade to starve the western Allies out of the city
B. technological advances such as the successful launch of the Sputnik
C. continued blustering and threats in the late 1950s and early 1960s
D. negotiations, summits, and conferences to put an end to the East-West conflict
E. supply of provisions through the air to East German cities

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Re V30-04  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Apr 2018, 06:12
Official Solution:

The existence of West Berlin, a conspicuously capitalist city deep within communist East Germany, "stuck like a bone in the Soviet throat," as Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev put it. The Russians began maneuvering to drive the United States, Britain and France out of the city for good. In 1948, a Soviet blockade of West Berlin aimed to starve the western Allies out of the city. Instead of retreating, however, the United States and its allies supplied their sectors of the city from the air. This effort, known as the Berlin Airlift, lasted for more than a year and delivered more than 2.3 million tons of food, fuel and other goods to West Berlin. The Soviets called off the blockade in 1949. After a decade of relative calm, tensions flared again in 1958. For the next three years, the Soviets emboldened by the successful launch of the Sputnik satellite the year before and embarrassed by the seemingly endless flow of refugees from east to west (nearly 3 million in the decade since the end of the blockade, many of them young skilled workers such as doctors, teachers and engineers) blustered and made threats, while the Allies resisted. Summits, conferences and other negotiations came and went without resolution. Meanwhile, the flood of refugees continued. In June 1961, some 19,000 people left the GDR through Berlin. The following month, 30,000 fled. In the first 11 days of August, 16,000 East Germans crossed the border into West Berlin, and on August 12 some 2,400 followed the largest number of defectors ever to leave East Germany in a single day.

All of the following measures failed to stop migration from East Germany EXCEPT

A. the Soviet blockade to starve the western Allies out of the city
B. technological advances such as the successful launch of the Sputnik
C. continued blustering and threats in the late 1950s and early 1960s
D. negotiations, summits, and conferences to put an end to the East-West conflict
E. supply of provisions through the air to East German cities

There is no mention of supplies that stopped people from migrating to the West. While A, B, C, D have all been referenced as ways to stop potential migrations ranging from blockades to negotiations.

Answer: E
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Re: V30-04  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2018, 00:48
While I agree that B, C, and D are mentioned in the passage, A and E are contesting to be the correct answer for me.

B: the Soviets-emboldened by the successful launch of the Sputnik satellite the year before and embarrassed by the seemingly endless flow of refugees from east to west
C: blustered and made threats, while the Allies resisted.
D: Summits, conferences and other negotiations came and went without resolution.

A: In fact, after reading a writing in the parentheses, (nearly 3 million in the decade since the end of the blockade, many of them young skilled workers such as doctors, teachers and engineers), the bold part gave me an impression that the Soviet blockade was actually one of the measures stopping migration from East Germany.

E: There is no direct relationship between the supply of provisions and migration; thus, the choice is one of the contenders.

Any thought?
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Re: V30-04  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2018, 22:14
With the mention of "This effort, known as the Berlin Airlift, lasted for more than a year and delivered more than 2.3 million tons of food, fuel and other goods to West Berlin," Option E is not the correct answer.
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Re: V30-04  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2018, 07:15
How is option E correct??

There is no relation between the aerial supplies and stopping of migration. If the passage is analysed in its entirety, the only logical answer to the question is option A, the Soviet blockade.

I agree that B, C, and D are not appropriate answers either, but E is not correct, because how is it right to assume that during the blockade it was acceptable/permitted for refugees to migrate out of East Germany (or also that the soviet blockade was only efficient enough to keep allied forces in but let refugees through), but after the launch of Sputnik and the flaring of tension in 1958, the Soviet were embarrassed by the amount of refugees that were leaving. It's nearly self contradictory to the Soviet's own agenda.

Only A makes sense, by neither allowing allied forces or refugees to leave and subsequently coincides with the Soviet's not embarrassing themselves.
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Re: V30-04 &nbs [#permalink] 22 Sep 2018, 07:15
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