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When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec

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When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2009, 19:53
3
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A
B
C
D
E

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When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally

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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2018, 23:11
ichha148 wrote:
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally


KAPLAN OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:



Gut instinct is the subject of the second clause. (Think of it this way: What is not formally sanctioned or prohibited? Gut instinct. The "which" clause modifies gut instinct.) The verb needs to agree with the singular instinct. Choices (A) and (B) are incorrect, since they use instinct are. (C) and (D) include the word a, while (E) does not: Does which is not or which is not a work better? Reading the options into the sentence, you'll see that the final a is necessary to modify means. Finally, choice (D) changes the meaning of the sentence. In the end, (C) is your best choice.

An 800 test taker knows that not only do subjects need to agree with their verbs, but they need to agree with their objects as well. So, it's incorrect to say the cats have a flea collar, the object must be plural as in the cats have flea collars.
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2009, 21:42
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ichha148 wrote:
OA is C , Can some one please explain to me why is D wrong ? is there any idiom?


in D the placement of formally is just wrong, it seems to change the meaning of the sentence. For example "we were formally not introduced"... this seems to mean we were not introduced because we werent supposed to be, as opposed to "we were not formally introduced" ...which just means we were not properly introduced.
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2009, 08:24
1
D. OA?

Why not C:

not a formally or prohibited means >> awkward...it should be not a formal or prohibited means
bigtreezl wrote:
ichha148 wrote:
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

a)which are not formally
b)which are not a formally
c)which is not a formally
d)which is formally not a
e)which is not formally


C
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2009, 15:57
OA is C , Can some one please explain to me why is D wrong ? is there any idiom?
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2009, 12:33
Agreed with peraspera. The adjective "formal" rather than the adverb "formally" will be meaningful. But in the end we have to choose only among the answer choices...
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2009, 12:43
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trainspotting wrote:
Agreed with peraspera. The adjective "formal" rather than the adverb "formally" will be meaningful. But in the end we have to choose only among the answer choices...



"formally" is an adverb that modifies the verbs sanctioned and prohibited. This is the correct word to use IMO
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2009, 13:06
trainspotting wrote:
Agreed with peraspera. The adjective "formal" rather than the adverb "formally" will be meaningful. But in the end we have to choose only among the answer choices...


Unless the original poster made a mistake/typo in the answer choices/question stem. 8-)
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2009, 13:09
bigtreezl wrote:
trainspotting wrote:
Agreed with peraspera. The adjective "formal" rather than the adverb "formally" will be meaningful. But in the end we have to choose only among the answer choices...



"formally" is an adverb that modifies the verbs sanctioned and prohibited. This is the correct word to use IMO


It would be correct to choose "formally" if the verb "sanctioned" was not underlined in the question stem.
As you can see, it is underlined, and choice C does not have this verb, therefore "formally" does not fit.

I'm 99.99% certain the poster made a typo somewhere, or underlined what he should not have (like the word "sanctioned", for example). 8-) All IMO, of course.
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2009, 09:36
ichha148 wrote:
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

a)which are not formally
b)which are not a formally
c)which is not a formally
d)which is formally not a
e)which is not formally


A and B are out - subject-verb agreement
E is out - a means refers to instinct which is singular
D has a misplaced modifier - formally should modify sanctioned or prohibited, not a ... means. Moreover, an adverb cannot modify a noun.
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2010, 22:22
i thinks its e, coz C doesn't seem to satisfy parallelism,If C was correct then it should be
"not A formally sanctioned or A prohibited "
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Nov 2010, 23:35
peraspera wrote:
bigtreezl wrote:
trainspotting wrote:
Agreed with peraspera. The adjective "formal" rather than the adverb "formally" will be meaningful. But in the end we have to choose only among the answer choices...



"formally" is an adverb that modifies the verbs sanctioned and prohibited. This is the correct word to use IMO


It would be correct to choose "formally" if the verb "sanctioned" was not underlined in the question stem.
As you can see, it is underlined, and choice C does not have this verb, therefore "formally" does not fit.

I'm 99.99% certain the poster made a typo somewhere, or underlined what he should not have (like the word "sanctioned", for example). 8-) All IMO, of course.


I think it would be a fair assumption that "sanctioned" was underlined by mistake (Option A does not have "sanctioned").

ichha148 wrote:
(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally

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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2011, 19:11
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I knew the difference between C and E

c)which is not a formally (sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.)
e)which is not formally (sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.)

If we choose E, we have problem with S-V agreement, "his or her instinct are means", that make nonsense. We really need "a" here to resolve the problem with "means" whether this word is plural or singular. In this case, it is singular.

Here is the explanation in dictionary.com
Means (N)

1.Usually, means. (used with a singular or plural verb) an agency, instrument, or method used to attain an end: The telephone is a means of communication. There are several means of solving the problem.
2.
means,
a.
available resources, especially money: They lived beyond their means.
b.
considerable financial resources; riches: a man of means.
3.
something that is midway between two extremes; something intermediate: to seek a mean between cynicism and blind faith.
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2012, 21:15
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally

First split happens with regards to subject-verb agreement. The subject is "instinct." It is singular.
So eliminate (A) and (B).

Second split (and last split) has something to do with logical construction and proper modifier (modification).
As such I go with (C) as it grasps the entire idea of what the author is trying to say.
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2012, 21:22
(C) which is not a formally

(D) which is formally not a

In the explanation in the book, "you'll see that the final a is neccessary to modify means."

How does a plural noun "means" need "a" ?

I looked up dictionary, and it says "means" can be both singular and plural.

Then, is "means" in this sentence considered singular becuase of "a verdict"?

Also, in the explanation in the book, "D changes the meaning of the sentence.

How??? :shock:
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2012, 21:36
eybrj2 wrote:
(C) which is not a formally

(D) which is formally not a

In the explanation in the book, "you'll see that the final a is neccessary to modify means."

How does a plural noun "means" need "a" ?

I looked up dictionary, and it says "means" can be both singular and plural.

Then, is "means" in this sentence considered singular becuase of "a verdict"?

Also, in the explanation in the book, "D changes the meaning of the sentence.

How??? :shock:


From www.thefreedictionary.com

4. means (used with a sing. or pl. verb) A method, a course of action, or an instrument by which an act can be accomplished or an end achieved.

So as you can see, this isn't a matter of singular or plural: means is plural or singular :)
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Nov 2013, 07:13
ichha148 wrote:
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

(A) which are not formally
(B) which are not a formally
(C) which is not a formally
(D) which is formally not a
(E) which is not formally


Good one;

Here there is clear cut explanation in the previous post about the answer choices. But i feel need explanation about why not D or Why not C ? The plot of the passage is court of law. In making the decision the juror needs to comply according to mentioned procedures in law. Which means that if the a procedure is documented in the law. D changes the meaning of the sentence as the procedure is mentioned as 'NOT SANCTIONED'. Is it possible? So the answer is C- which clear cut identifies the verb agreement error and meaning.

Hope that helps

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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jun 2014, 04:48
C. gut instinct, which is not a formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.

a formally sanctioned or prohibited means (SUBJECT SINGULAR) goes well with verb IS

formally (adverb) -- sanctioned or prohibited (both adjective) -- means (noun)

sanctioned or prohibited means (adjective + noun )

formally (adverb) is modifying adjectives sanctioned or prohibited.

Therefore, C is grammatically correct.
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2015, 09:02
eybrj2 wrote:
When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to decide a case according to his or her gut instinct, which are not formally sanctioned or prohibited means of reaching a verdict.


(A) which are not formally
the verb needs to be in singular

(B) which are not a formally
the verb needs to be in singular

(C) which is not a formally
correct

(D) which is formally not a
changes meaning

(E) which is not formally
a formally sanctioned or a formally prohibited means is not the same as
formally sanctioned or formally prohibited means
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Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2017, 05:49
Can someone explain the difference between C and D. I am still not convinced with explanations provided.
Re: When presented with only circumstantial evidence, a juror tends to dec &nbs [#permalink] 05 Mar 2017, 05:49

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