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A diagonal line connecting two corners of a rectangle is also the hypo

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New post 18 Sep 2019, 03:12
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A
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A diagonal line connecting two corners of a rectangle is also the hypotenuse of each of two right triangles contained within the rectangle, which is longer than any of the sides.

A. which is longer than any of the sides

B. and the line is longer than any of the sides

C. which is longer than the sides

D. that is longer than any of the sides

E. that is longer than any of the other sides

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New post 18 Sep 2019, 03:41
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Quote:
A diagonal line connecting two corners of a rectangle is also the hypotenuse of each of two right triangles contained within the rectangle, which is longer than any of the sides.
A. which is longer than any of the sides

B. and the line is longer than any of the sides

C. which is longer than the sides

D. that is longer than any of the sides

E. that is longer than any of the other sides


This topic teaches the irrelevance of the touch rule of the relative pronoun "which" in some situations.
'Which' refers to the diagonal line logially, but unfortunately that is the subject, placed far away. The noun that the pronoun is touching happens to be the rectangle and makes no sense to refer. Therefore Choices A and C can be eliminated.

The most important clue for the correct choice is that in a comparative degree of comparison, the use of the word 'other' is mandatory to distinguish the compared line with the rest of the crowd either singly or jointly. As per this norm, only E is the eligible correct choice.
However, the use of 'that' with a comma before to refer to the hypotenuse, which is not the noun in front, will remain a contentious issue in a correct choice.
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New post 18 Sep 2019, 04:18
Bunuel wrote:
A diagonal line connecting two corners of a rectangle is also the hypotenuse of each of two right triangles contained within the rectangle, which is longer than any of the sides.

A. which is longer than any of the sides

B. and the line is longer than any of the sides

C. which is longer than the sides

D. that is longer than any of the sides

E. that is longer than any of the other sides


Rules by which you can eliminate the choices..

(1) Which modifies the previous noun/noun phrase
Here WHICH should modify HYPOTENUSE logically, but is separated by verb and many other words...Eliminate A and C
(2) COMMA
The COMMA tells us that THAT should not be used here. D and E are eliminated

Only option left is B..
B correctly uses AND to join two clauses. Also, COMMA is correctly used.
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New post 18 Sep 2019, 05:18
daagh wrote:
Quote:
A diagonal line connecting two corners of a rectangle is also the hypotenuse of each of two right triangles contained within the rectangle, which is longer than any of the sides.
A. which is longer than any of the sides

B. and the line is longer than any of the sides

C. which is longer than the sides

D. that is longer than any of the sides

E. that is longer than any of the other sides


This topic teaches the irrelevance of the touch rule of the relative pronoun "which" in some situations.
'Which' refers to the diagonal line logially, but unfortunately that is the subject, placed far away. The noun that the pronoun is touching happens to be the rectangle and makes no sense to refer. Therefore Choices A and C can be eliminated.

The most important clue for the correct choice is that in a comparative degree of comparison, the use of the word 'other' is mandatory to distinguish the compared line with the rest of the crowd either singly or jointly. As per this norm, only E is the eligible correct choice.
However, the use of 'that' with a comma before to refer to the hypotenuse, which is not the noun in front, will remain a contentious issue in a correct choice.



But shouldn't the diagonal have to be a side to make the use of "any of the other sides" relevant?
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New post 18 Sep 2019, 06:16
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Isn't the the hyp a side according to the dictionaray? <the side of a right triangle opposite the right angle.> In addition, if hyp were not a side, how can we ever compare it with another side? Aren't we comparaing inequal things?
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New post 18 Sep 2019, 06:25
I believe it's B. Comma + that is BS. Which isn't referring to hypotenuse.

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New post 18 Sep 2019, 06:42
daagh wrote:
Isn't the the hyp a side according to the dictionaray? <the side of a right triangle opposite the right angle.> In addition, if hyp were not a side, how can we ever compare it with another side? Aren't we comparaing inequal things?


In case of a triangle, yes.

But meaning wise, what if the length of the diagonal is being compared with the length of sides of the rectangle ?

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New post 18 Sep 2019, 06:51
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WHEN YOU NEED OTHER OR ELSE

When the person or object you are comparing is part of a group, you need to include the word other to prevent another kind of confusion.
Confusing: Roger is a better tuba player than any boy in his class.
Improved: Roger is a better tuba player than any other boy in his class.
The problem is subtle, which is why the mistake is made so often. Without the word other clarifying that Roger is included in the group boys in his class, it would seem that Roger is in fact a girl. And Roger is an unusual name for a girl.
I’ll give a few more examples in case this isn’t clear yet.
Sarah is more shy than any student in class.
This sounds like Sarah is being compared to students in the class, but she isn’t a student herself. If she is a student, it should go like this:
Sarah is more shy than any other student in class.
Else does a similar job. It’s used with pronouns like anyone, somebody, or no one
Sarah is more shy than any student in class.
This sounds like Sarah is being compared to students in the class, but she isn’t a student herself. If she is a student, it should go like this:
Sarah is more shy than any other student in class.


Source : http://blog.writeathome.com/index.php/2 ... r-or-else/

My side of the comparison.

When you say any side or sides , then you are including the compared diagonal line also with other sides. That means you are comparing diagonal with the diagonal itself> Threfore, then a diagonal cannot be longer than the same diagonal. When you include the word 'other' you are eliminating the aberration of self-comparison.
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New post 18 Sep 2019, 06:59
daagh wrote:
Quote:
A diagonal line connecting two corners of a rectangle is also the hypotenuse of each of two right triangles contained within the rectangle, which is longer than any of the sides.
A. which is longer than any of the sides

B. and the line is longer than any of the sides

C. which is longer than the sides

D. that is longer than any of the sides

E. that is longer than any of the other sides


This topic teaches the irrelevance of the touch rule of the relative pronoun "which" in some situations.
'Which' refers to the diagonal line logially, but unfortunately that is the subject, placed far away. The noun that the pronoun is touching happens to be the rectangle and makes no sense to refer. Therefore Choices A and C can be eliminated.

The most important clue for the correct choice is that in a comparative degree of comparison, the use of the word 'other' is mandatory to distinguish the compared line with the rest of the crowd either singly or jointly. As per this norm, only E is the eligible correct choice.
However, the use of 'that' with a comma before to refer to the hypotenuse, which is not the noun in front, will remain a contentious issue in a correct choice.


daagh - You havent discussed about 'B'. I do understand sometimes even the correct answer would have some sort of questionable reasons for being right, and we try to find comparatively better answers.. but in here wont ", that" should directly be the reason for crossing off 'D' and 'E', and even 'B - 'longer than any of the sides'' appears to be Ok, I felt 'other' as an extra word.
Your thoughts?

Bunuel - OA, and original reasoning, pls?
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New post 18 Sep 2019, 07:25
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If you ask me, whether the missing of the adjective "other" is fatal in a comparative degree of comparison within a group, I would say yes and therefore reject B. This is not a question of Geometry but English style. But what is the problem with using 'other'? Is it redundant?

I have made it clear, I don't like E either. Probably the problem lies in question. If the question itself is faulty, there is no point in delving into it.

But, is it ok to compromise on principles? I am not clear.
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New post 18 Sep 2019, 07:56
I concur.

Other is mandarory in such cases. One can choose either B or E, both are equally bad. Just understand what is wrong and move on

daagh wrote:
If you ask me, whether the missing of the adjective "other" is fatal in a comparative degree of comparison within a group, I would say yes and therefore reject B. This is not a question of Geometry but English style. But what is the problem with using 'other'? Is it redundant?

I have made it clear, I don't like E either. Probably the problem lies in question. If the question itself is faulty, there is no point in delving into it.

But, is it ok to compromise on principles? I am not clear.
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New post 18 Sep 2019, 12:35
daagh - my question is coming from my understanding (which could be faulty) that.. "comma + that" is incorrect here and that was the reason i rejected D & E

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Re: A diagonal line connecting two corners of a rectangle is also the hypo   [#permalink] 18 Sep 2019, 12:35
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