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A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective

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A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2010, 16:58
3
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A
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D
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Question Stats:

58% (01:17) correct 42% (01:28) wrong based on 668 sessions

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A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective was important, commented: “Well, it sort of commands the valley, so it would be important in a conventional war. But this isn’t a conventional war, so I guess it means nothing.”

The speaker’s conclusion would be most strengthened if it were true that


A. the speaker is skilled in conventional warfare

B. commanding a valley is important in unconventional wars

C. commanding the valley is an objective in the war under discussion

D. this is an unconventional war

E. whatever is important in a conventional war is unimportant in an unconventional war

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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2010, 08:35
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shrive555 wrote:
A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective was important, commented: “Well, it sort of commands the valley, so it would be important in a conventional war. But this isn’t a conventional war, so I guess it means nothing.”

The speaker’s conclusion would be most strengthened if it were true that

the speaker is skilled in conventional warfare
commanding a valley is important in unconventional wars
commanding the valley is an objective in the war under discussion
this is an unconventional war
whatever is important in a conventional war is unimportant in an unconventional war


Look at his train of thought:
Premises:
Commands the valley, so important in conventional war.
This is not conventional war.

Conclusion: So not important.

This is not a logical conclusion, right? Something that is important in conventional war could also be important in an unconventional one. What can I do to strengthen this conclusion. Is there a missing premise, which, if added could make this argument logical?
If I were to add a premise here 'what is important in a conventional war, is not important in an unconventional one', would the conclusion become valid?

See again:
Premises:
-Commands the valley, so important in conventional war.
-This is not conventional war.
-What is important in a conventional war, is not important in an unconventional one

Conclusion: So not important.

Now it is a valid conclusion. So the argument can be strengthened by adding this premise, this new information. Hence, answer is (E).
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Nov 2010, 08:52
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Go with E
argument = comparison b\w conventional & unconventional wars ---> what fits in conventional do not fit in unconventional.
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Nov 2010, 10:25
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Only one which supports/strenghtens the conclusion is E.

The rest are all irrelevant OR extreme to assume.
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2016, 03:14
strengthen is nothing but a type of assumption support the link between premise and conclusion
option E is a straightforward choice as provides the basic assumption on which the underlying argument is based.
If we negate this statement we can see that the conclusion clearly falls apart
Correct answer - E
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2018, 00:41
VeritasKarishma wrote:
shrive555 wrote:
A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective was important, commented: “Well, it sort of commands the valley, so it would be important in a conventional war. But this isn’t a conventional war, so I guess it means nothing.”

The speaker’s conclusion would be most strengthened if it were true that

the speaker is skilled in conventional warfare
commanding a valley is important in unconventional wars
commanding the valley is an objective in the war under discussion
this is an unconventional war
whatever is important in a conventional war is unimportant in an unconventional war


Look at his train of thought:
Premises:
Commands the valley, so important in conventional war.
This is not conventional war.



Conclusion: So not important.

This is not a logical conclusion, right? Something that is important in conventional war could also be important in an unconventional one. What can I do to strengthen this conclusion. Is there a missing premise, which, if added could make this argument logical?
If I were to add a premise here 'what is important in a conventional war, is not important in an unconventional one', would the conclusion become valid?

See again:
Premises:
-Commands the valley, so important in conventional war.
-This is not conventional war.
-What is important in a conventional war, is not important in an unconventional one

Conclusion: So not important.

Now it is a valid conclusion. So the argument can be strengthened by adding this premise, this new information. Hence, answer is (E).


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Hi Karishma,
Why not option D?

Thanks.
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2018, 03:39
Anoushka1995 wrote:
VeritasKarishma wrote:
shrive555 wrote:
A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective was important, commented: “Well, it sort of commands the valley, so it would be important in a conventional war. But this isn’t a conventional war, so I guess it means nothing.”

The speaker’s conclusion would be most strengthened if it were true that

the speaker is skilled in conventional warfare
commanding a valley is important in unconventional wars
commanding the valley is an objective in the war under discussion
this is an unconventional war
whatever is important in a conventional war is unimportant in an unconventional war


Look at his train of thought:
Premises:
Commands the valley, so important in conventional war.
This is not conventional war.



Conclusion: So not important.

This is not a logical conclusion, right? Something that is important in conventional war could also be important in an unconventional one. What can I do to strengthen this conclusion. Is there a missing premise, which, if added could make this argument logical?
If I were to add a premise here 'what is important in a conventional war, is not important in an unconventional one', would the conclusion become valid?

See again:
Premises:
-Commands the valley, so important in conventional war.
-This is not conventional war.
-What is important in a conventional war, is not important in an unconventional one

Conclusion: So not important.

Now it is a valid conclusion. So the argument can be strengthened by adding this premise, this new information. Hence, answer is (E).


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Hi Karishma,
Why not option D?

Thanks.


(D) is already given in the argument (this is an unconventional war). Hence adding it again will have no impact on the argument/conclusion.
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2018, 04:22
E is clear cut answer here. If we negate Option E our conclusion shall fall apart. Also Option D is an inference answer choice Anoushka1995
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2018, 05:34
This question might be kind of silly but where is it mentioned that it's an unconventional war? It could also mean that there is no war at all. That is the reason that I did not chose E. I chose C instead which says "C. commanding the valley is an objective in the war under discussion
". Can someone please explain?
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2018, 02:46
How can the answer be E, it is too extreme. For instance, clearing out of civilians might be important in a conventional war that does not mean it is not important in an unconditional war. War is still war and civilians need to be evacuated.

Similarly there might be many reasons where things can be both important and unimportant in both cases. We can't generalize and assume everything that is important in a conventional war is not important in an unconventional war.
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2018, 08:10
vanditk2 wrote:
How can the answer be E, it is too extreme. For instance, clearing out of civilians might be important in a conventional war that does not mean it is not important in an unconditional war. War is still war and civilians need to be evacuated.

Similarly there might be many reasons where things can be both important and unimportant in both cases. We can't generalize and assume everything that is important in a conventional war is not important in an unconventional war.


You are confusing two different questions: 1) whether E is (or can be) true, and 2) whether if it true, it strengthens the argument?
You give excellent reasons to think the answer to the first question is "no". But this is not the relevant question!
To answer the question we are asked, we must assume E is true (plausibility and likelihood aside) and investigate the logical conclusion of that. In this case, if E is true, it seriously strengthens the claim.
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2018, 08:13
Rid21sa wrote:
This question might be kind of silly but where is it mentioned that it's an unconventional war? It could also mean that there is no war at all. That is the reason that I did not chose E. I chose C instead which says "C. commanding the valley is an objective in the war under discussion
". Can someone please explain?


C only tells us what we could have already assumed - that C is an objective. this is heavily implied in the question. but it does nothing to strengthen the conclusion.

as for E - look at my answer to vanditk2: you seem to be discussion whether the information in E makes sense or is likely or not. but this is beside the point. the question is : If E is true, does this strengthen the conclusion? The answer is yes, because this is something the paratrooper is assuming, and knowing it is true would strengthen his claim.
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Re: A paratrooper, when asked whether he believed the military objective &nbs [#permalink] 25 Sep 2018, 08:13
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