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A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart

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A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal department of education found that children aged 7-10 who watched more than 25hours of television per week performed worse in school than children of the same age who watched fewer than 25hours of television per week. Therefore, parents of children aged 7-10 should prohibit their children from watching more than 25hours of television per week.

Which of the following if true, would best strengthen the argument?
A) A separate study, by renowned graduate school of education. found that when parents prohibited their children from watching any television, the children's reading scores increased rapidly and significantly and stayed high indefinitely.
B) Children who watched more than 25 hours of television per week also performed worse on measures of physical fitness than children who watched fewer than 25 hours per week.
C) The tele shows that children aged 7-10 are most likely to watch are saturated with ads for products, such as toys and candy, of little educational value.
D) The dept of education study gave appropriate weight to children of backgrounds representative of children nationwide.
E) Children who develop a habit of extensive television watching are more likely than others to maintain that habit as an adult.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2016, 19:13
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rachitshah wrote:
A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal department of education found that children aged 7-10 who watched more than 25hours of television per week performed worse in school than children of the same age who watched fewer than 25hours of television per week. Therefore, parents of children aged 7-10 should prohibit their children from watching more than 25hours of television per week.

Which of the following if true, would best strengthen the argument?
A) A separate study, by renowned graduate school of education. found that when parents prohibited their children from watching any television, the children's reading scores increased rapidly and significantly and stayed high indefinitely.
B) Children who watched more than 25 hours of television per week also performed worse on measures of physical fitness than children who watched fewer than 25 hours per week.
C) The tele shows that children aged 7-10 are most likely to watch are saturated with ads for products, such as toys and candy, of little educational value.
D) The dept of education study gave appropriate weight to children of backgrounds representative of children nationwide.
E) Children who develop a habit of extensive television watching are more likely than others to maintain that habit as an adult.



Hi,
lets rewrite the PARA--
A svy says sbout a particular age group that if they watch TV more than 25 hours, they ar elikely to perform worse than those who watch less than 25 h a week..
therefore parents should prohibit students watching >25 h a week..

lets see the choices
A) A separate study, by renowned graduate school of education. found that when parents prohibited their children from watching any television, the children's reading scores increased rapidly and significantly and stayed high indefinitely.
It seems to strengthening the argument, but fails on two accounts--
1) we are talking of a specific age group, while the choice is generic on age group
2) we are talkin of a threshold or a limit of 25 hours


B) Children who watched more than 25 hours of television per week also performed worse on measures of physical fitness than children who watched fewer than 25 hours per week.
Our focus is in PERFORMANCE in school

C) The tele shows that children aged 7-10 are most likely to watch are saturated with ads for products, such as toys and candy, of little educational value.
Out of context

D) The dept of education study gave appropriate weight to children of backgrounds representative of children nationwide.
Tis choice CORRECTLY confirms fairness in the survey and sy to be true representive

E) Children who develop a habit of extensive television watching are more likely than others to maintain that habit as an adult.
OUT of context

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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2016, 21:07
In-depth analysis by chetan2u.

I was stuck in choice D for a while. but later realized that the option is playing the role of one of assumption that the author makes.
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A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2016, 06:34
Wondering why C is wrong.. If a kid initially spent say 30 hours on a show saturated with ads for products and reduced that time spent from 30 to 20 hours, it is quite possible that the kid's performance in school improved.. Please let me know where I am going wrong..
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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2016, 07:04
chetan2u wrote:


C) The tele shows that children aged 7-10 are most likely to watch are saturated with ads for products, such as toys and candy, of little educational value.
Out of context



chetan2u, why is C out of context?
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A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2016, 12:47
A) A separate study, by xyz. found ..when parents prohibited children from watching any television - any TV time vs less than 25 hour and more than 25 hour (so tricky but not related)
B) Children who watched more than 25 hours also performed worse on physical fitness - fitness not related
C) The tele shows that child (7-10) ads for products, such as toys and candy, of little educational value. - out of scope , as children watching under 25 hours may be watching the same ads, how are ads related to < > 25 hour TV time
D) The dept of education study gave appropriate weight to children of backgrounds representative of children nationwide. Correct, protect the argument from possible weakeners
E) Children who develop a habit of extensive television. - not related

Quote:

rs47

Regarding C , to answer why its out of Scope?
C) The tele shows that child (7-10) are full of ads for products, such as toys and candy, of little educational value.
Now it dosn't explain why children watching under 25 hours are still performing well (may be watching the same ads) and how others watching more than 25 hours are affected, how are ads related to < > 25 hour TV time

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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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A simple way to solve all such CR questions is to find a statement which changes the conditions of the original experiment - because logically if the experiment was not conducted with the proper sample space - it cannot be used to reason an argument.

In this case - if D is correct or wrong, messes with the sample of students on which the experiment is based. Therefore, it is the most important point for the argument to hold true.

This is a universal rule - and applies to all CR questions.

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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2016, 06:27
UJs, great got it.. thanks a lot!!
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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2016, 07:56
rs47 wrote:
chetan2u wrote:


C) The tele shows that children aged 7-10 are most likely to watch are saturated with ads for products, such as toys and candy, of little educational value.
Out of context



chetan2u, why is C out of context?


Here a person believes that parents should prohibit their kids from watching +25 hours of tv. He thinks this because of a study made by the education department. This is the argument you have to strengthen.

The argument is focusing in the hours of tv not in the content. For this type of questions fist find the conclusion and evidence (argument) of the person in question. Then find the answer that supports the argument.
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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2016, 00:25
B) Children who watched more than 25 hours of television per week also performed worse on measures of physical fitness than children who watched fewer than 25 hours per week.
Our focus is in PERFORMANCE in school

---------------
I am wondering why it is not answer B.
Look, this is a strengthen question, not an assumption one.
If it is an assumption question, then D is the correct answer.
But as it is a strengthen question, then B should be the best choice. The choice should be an evidence, not an assumption. It will strengthen the conclusion that parents prohibit children from watching more than 25 hours of television per week not only due to school performance but also because of fitness performance.

Could anyone clarify?
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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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nathalie1107 It's fine to choose an assumption as a strengthen. The problem is only in going the other way. In other words, if a statement is necessary for an argument to make sense, then proving that assumption correct strengthens the argument. However, if a statement would strengthen the argument, that doesn't necessarily mean it is necessary for the argument to make sense.

Also, remember that our job is to strengthen the argument, not just to support the conclusion. The argument bases its conclusion that TV time should be restricted on the premise that kids who watch a lot of TV do worse in school. While B provides an alternative reason to cut down on TV, it does nothing to strengthen the existing argument.

In fact, B could weaken the argument. By providing another factor that these kids have in common, it leaves open the possibility that this other factor (low levels of fitness) is what is causing the children's poor performance in school. This kind of correlation/causation issue is quite common in CR. Sure, it's possible that TV is causing both effects (low fitness and low school performance), but it's also possible that poor fitness is causing both the TV viewing and the poor school performance. (For instance, maybe unhealthy children are more likely to stay in and watch TV, but also have trouble with schoolwork.)
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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2016, 07:08
Hi DmitryFarber (I still cannot post a link to your nickname), many thanks for your very thorough explanation.
It makes me feel much clearer about how an argument is constructed in the stimulus and how to select an direct answer, not a "disturbing" one.
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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2017, 10:20
standard GMAT type question. If you have a case study, then option which shows that the considered group is representative of all/most background then option would strengthen the argument.

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Re: A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2017, 11:31
Can anyone plaease explain what does choice D means.

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A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2017, 07:35
techiesam wrote:
Can anyone plaease explain what does choice D means.

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I'll try to explain what I understood from the argument.

If you are conducting a study about something and deducing something then we need to make sure that all the sufficient parameters have been taken into account. Here, the study is on children aged between 7-10 and their habits. It could be possible that the research was on similar types of kids and a conclusion was made for all the kids. This could hurt the argument and the conclusion. Hence D here states that the study was carried out on all types of kids and that given demographic truly represents entire population of kids between 7-10. This will help to solidify the claim.
A study of children's television-watching habits by the federal depart   [#permalink] 07 Mar 2017, 07:35
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