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According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were

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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2017, 02:31
abhimahna wrote:
HappyQuakka wrote:
hazelnut abhimahna

I go this question right, but I thought the 'figure' in the last part of the question stem was referring to the percentage of female grad students, not the number.

1. Is that interpretation wrong
2. is C still the correct answer even with my interpretation?

Thx!


Hi HappyQuakka ,

Actually NO. The figure is referring to the count rather than the %.

It is actually wrong to say double the % for another year.

As per the meaning of the sentence, we are comparing the females in one year with females in another. We are not comparing the % of graduates in one year with % of graduates in another year.

You might have got C as the right answer with POE because all others are wrong. (This is my assumption.)

Does that make sense?


Hi Abhimahna,
Please help me to understand the error in B. I thought an additional in is understood in B, and so the sentence stands out as
According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were 198, 113 female science and engineering graduate students, almost 42% of the graduate students in those fields, twice as many as (in) 1981.
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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2017, 04:03
sunny91 wrote:
Hi Abhimahna,
Please help me to understand the error in B. I thought an additional in is understood in B, and so the sentence stands out as
According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were 198, 113 female science and engineering graduate students, almost 42% of the graduate students in those fields, twice as many as (in) 1981.


Hi sunny91 ,

Here I go.

The biggest problem with B is we are comparing the number with the year. This is not allowed.

Now, let me talk about ellipsis. You are saying what is you add "in".

Consider the two scenarios:

According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were 198, 113 female science and engineering graduate students, almost 42% of the graduate students in those fields, twice as many as (in) 1981. --> Shouldn't this be "number in"? Ellipsis rule says you can omit number and that would imply internally rather than omitting the prepositions such as "in" itself.

According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were 198, 113 female science and engineering graduate students, almost 42% of the graduate students in those fields, twice as many as [number]in 1981. --> Okay, the now your rule works. Now, I can say I am comparing the numbers and I don't need to explicitly mention them.

Does that make sense?
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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2017, 05:11
abhimahna wrote:
sunny91 wrote:
Hi Abhimahna,
Please help me to understand the error in B. I thought an additional in is understood in B, and so the sentence stands out as
According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were 198, 113 female science and engineering graduate students, almost 42% of the graduate students in those fields, twice as many as (in) 1981.


Hi sunny91 ,

Here I go.

The biggest problem with B is we are comparing the number with the year. This is not allowed.

Now, let me talk about ellipsis. You are saying what is you add "in".

Consider the two scenarios:

According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were 198, 113 female science and engineering graduate students, almost 42% of the graduate students in those fields, twice as many as (in) 1981. --> Shouldn't this be "number in"? Ellipsis rule says you can omit number and that would imply internally rather than omitting the prepositions such as "in" itself.

According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were 198, 113 female science and engineering graduate students, almost 42% of the graduate students in those fields, twice as many as [number]in 1981. --> Okay, the now your rule works. Now, I can say I am comparing the numbers and I don't need to explicitly mention them.

Does that make sense?



Thanks Abhimahna.
Now I understood we can't take preposition as implied.
Example- I have 4 shirts, twice as many as (the number) you have. Here,the number is implied. Also, I went through your debrief and it looks very inspirational.
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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2018, 10:23
I still get confusing here, C should be correct. However, in a similar question, D is the answer.
So, my question is, when "double what it was" is correct?
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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2018, 11:12
chesstitans wrote:
I still get confusing here, C should be correct. However, in a similar question, D is the answer.
So, my question is, when "double what it was" is correct?



When it has a clear antecedent.
Eg: My TSH now is 12, double what it was in last summer.
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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2018, 23:13
Dear abhimahna , GMATNinja , daagh,
Can you please justify the using of "for" after figure rather than using of "in". Please enlighten me. I feel a bit awkward because of that word "for", rendering me to roll down all options.

Thank you
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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2018, 02:30
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Nightmare007 wrote:
Dear abhimahna , GMATNinja , daagh,
Can you please justify the using of "for" after figure rather than using of "in". Please enlighten me. I feel a bit awkward because of that word "for", rendering me to roll down all options.

Thank you


Hey Nightmare007 ,

I am happy to help.

First of all, please note that AWKWARDNESS is NEVER a reason to reject any option. I have emphasized this alot many times. Please take this word out of your dictionary. :)

Now, I would not bother much about figure for vs figure in when I know why the other 4 options are incorrect.

Does that make sense?
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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2018, 04:28
abhimahna wrote:
Nightmare007 wrote:
Dear abhimahna , GMATNinja , daagh,
Can you please justify the using of "for" after figure rather than using of "in". Please enlighten me. I feel a bit awkward because of that word "for", rendering me to roll down all options.

Thank you


Hey Nightmare007 ,

I am happy to help.

First of all, please note that AWKWARDNESS is NEVER a reason to reject any option. I have emphasized this alot many times. Please take this word out of your dictionary. :)

Now, I would not bother much about figure for vs figure in when I know why the other 4 options are incorrect.

Does that make sense?


So we can use figure + for here. :)
Thank you
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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 02 May 2018, 10:24
I really dont think this question has been answered clearly . Here is my interpretation of the correct answer :

According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were 198- No of Females ,113 female science and engineering graduate students, almost 42% of the graduate students in those fields, twice as much as 1981.

Here we are comparing the no of Females in 2003 with the no of females in 1981. Lets try POE

(A) twice as much as 1981- Since you are comparing 2 numbers (Countable )you cannot use much (Un-countable )

(B) twice as many as 1981- Here you are comparing the no of females to year 1981 which is wrong comparison

(C) double the figure for 1981 - Double which means 2 times the figure (No of females ) for 1981 - Lets keep this one

(D) double what it was in 1981 - What does it refer to ? The No of females / the percentage of females ?

(E) a number double that of 1981’s - Usage of 'THAT OF' makes the usage of "1981's" (possessive) redundant. The usage of either "DOUBLE 1981's" or "DOUBLE THAT OF 1981" would be correct.
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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 02 May 2018, 23:08
Hi,
I have my doubts whether it is indeed the number of female candidates being compared or it is the percentage being compared.
For one, the number of female candidates is odd. Therefore, it can't be double of any number. When numbers are being compared, does the comparison allow for approximations? The percentage is 42% which can be double of 21% of all graduates in 1981. When we are comparing percentages, what rules should be followed?
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According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 14 Aug 2018, 00:08
slayer1983 wrote:
Hi,
I have my doubts whether it is indeed the number of female candidates being compared or it is the percentage being compared.
For one, the number of female candidates is odd. Therefore, it can't be double of any number. When numbers are being compared, does the comparison allow for approximations? The percentage is 42% which can be double of 21% of all graduates in 1981. When we are comparing percentages, what rules should be followed?


I am on the same boat. To add to all this, the comparison clause is preceded immediately by the percentage figure not the student count figure. Thus, I thought we were comparing the percentages not the number of female candidates.

Why does it HAVE to be the number of female candidates and not percentage here?

It wasn't a choice but if "twice as much as in 1981" was an option, I would definitely pick that.

Originally posted by ssk13809 on 14 Aug 2018, 00:06.
Last edited by ssk13809 on 14 Aug 2018, 00:08, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2018, 00:07
abhimahna wrote:
HappyQuakka wrote:
hazelnut abhimahna

I go this question right, but I thought the 'figure' in the last part of the question stem was referring to the percentage of female grad students, not the number.

1. Is that interpretation wrong
2. is C still the correct answer even with my interpretation?

Thx!


Hi HappyQuakka ,

Actually NO. The figure is referring to the count rather than the %.

It is actually wrong to say double the % for another year.

As per the meaning of the sentence, we are comparing the females in one year with females in another. We are not comparing the % of graduates in one year with % of graduates in another year.

You might have got C as the right answer with POE because all others are wrong. (This is my assumption.)

Does that make sense?



Why does it have to be the count rather than the %? See the 2 posts above...
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According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2018, 01:13
ssk13809 wrote:
abhimahna wrote:
HappyQuakka wrote:
hazelnut abhimahna

I go this question right, but I thought the 'figure' in the last part of the question stem was referring to the percentage of female grad students, not the number.

1. Is that interpretation wrong
2. is C still the correct answer even with my interpretation?

Thx!


Hi HappyQuakka ,

Actually NO. The figure is referring to the count rather than the %.

It is actually wrong to say double the % for another year.

As per the meaning of the sentence, we are comparing the females in one year with females in another. We are not comparing the % of graduates in one year with % of graduates in another year.

You might have got C as the right answer with POE because all others are wrong. (This is my assumption.)

Does that make sense?



Why does it have to be the count rather than the %? See the 2 posts above...


Quote:
According to the National Science Foundation, in 2003 there were 198,113 female science and engineering graduate students, almost 42% of the graduate students in those fields, twice as much as 1981.
A. twice as much as 1981
B. twice as many as 1981
C. double the figure for 1981
D. double what it was in 1981
E. a number double that of 1981’s


The information between the commas i.e. almost 42% of the graduate students in those fields is given as a noun modifier and modifies the noun students.
If you use the slash and burn method, the sentence still makes sense. The comparison is between the number of female students in 2003 to the number of female students in 1981.

Take a look at an example:
Beethoven's music, which broke a number of established rules with its structure and melodic form, is considered more revolutionary than Bach.
First, we find the comparison signal: MORE revolutionary THAN.... Now we look for the two things being compared. It is often easier to find the second thing, which follows the comparison signal:

More revolutionary than Bach. So, what is more revolutionary than Bach? The subject ofthe sentence: Beethovens music. This comparison is not parallel.
We have to be careful, since sometimes we talk about the music ofBach as “Bach” (e.g., I like to listen to Bach on the radio). However, if the sentence has referred to Beethoven s music with the word music, then the sentence should do the same with Bachs music.
Right: Beethoven's music, which broke a number of established rules with its structure and melodic form, is considered MORE revolutionary THAN BACH'S.

For detailed explanation and understanding the concept in detail please refer to Manhattan Sentence Correction Strategy Guide.
Page No. 128, 129, Chapter 8, Comparisons.
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