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Amerasia MBA Blog

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MBA Snapshot: The Wharton School [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2017, 15:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Snapshot: The Wharton School
The Wharton School is considered by many to be the best business school in the world.  Unlike many of its competitors in the top then, however, Wharton is one of the few business schools which has both an undergraduate and a graduate business program, essentially doubling its resources.  Here are three other reasons why Wharton is so well respected…1)      Global AnalyticsThe Wharton School integrates global learning into its core curriculum and extracurricular activities like no other school.  Through key courses such as The Global Learning Practicum, Global Immersion Program, and Global Modular courses, Wharton students leave with not only a global perspective on business from an academic view, but also practical global experience under their belts.  Couple it with Wharton’s strong network of finance professionals in their alumni ranks, and you’re left with a school which is basically considered the standard against which all other finance programs are measured.  Wharton has always had a corner on the finance industry, but their timing over the past decade, which has been in lock-step sync with the expanding global marketplace and growth in quantitative analytics, has permanently positioned the school as the ideal place to study global business within a deeply analytical framework.  Got a low score on the quant portion of the GMAT?  You might consider applying elsewhere.
2)      Dual DegreesWharton’s dedication to a global perspective is also evident in their dual degree options, including an MBA/MA in International Studies (through the Lauder program).  Dual degrees allow a deeper dive into a specific area of expertise, and the Wharton School essentially pioneered the idea of connecting the MBA with a myriad of alternate studies.  With access to the whole of Penn as well as other institutions, including world-renowned Johns Hopkins University as well as the Kennedy School at Harvard, Wharton students can customize the exact education they desire.  There is even an MBA/Veterinary medicine degree option. Of course a separate admissions decision must be made for any school outside of Wharton, but you can thank their open approach to dual degree options as the reason Wharton will consider a GRE score as an alternative to the GMAT. 
3)      Social ImpactThere’s no better proof of dedication to bettering the common good than an in-house student loan forgiveness program for Wharton alumni who work in a non-profit field.  Perhaps grounded in founder Joseph Wharton’s vision to create graduates who manifest “economic and social good,” Wharton’s efforts to provide opportunities for students to impact the community, both during school and after, are evident across the program.  In addition to coursework which emphasizes bettering lives, not just bettering the bottom line, at Wharton, you can even major in Social Impact Management, so applicants with social impact goals make the pool quite competitive.  Sure, all schools advertise that their students and alumni care about and make a meaningful impact on the world, but Wharton truly puts their money where their mouth is. Let us help you position yourself to be as attractive as you can be for the Wharton School.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us viahttp://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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MBA Snapshot: Columbia Business School [#permalink]

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New post 29 Dec 2017, 11:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Snapshot: Columbia Business School
Columbia Business School is located in the energetic business capital of the universe, but that’s not the only reason why this ivy league business school remains consistently in the top ten.  Here’s a snapshot of the three things Columbia is most known for…1)      Finance-driven megaforceWith the exception of NYU, which is just a hop away, Columbia sends more grads into high finance careers than any other top tier business school.  That kind of track record has created a powerhouse alumni network which only further grows their ranks in this high paying industry.  There was a time when Columbia siphoned off a huge percentage of investment banking jobs each year, but partly because that field has diminished in popularity and partly because Columbia has been making efforts to diversify their graduating MBA job offers, i-banking now makes up less than half of the jobs chosen by finance majors finishing at Columbia.
2)      Manhattan LocationSeems obvious, but their geographic location is so important to the school’s ethos, both taglines over the past two decades have promoted it. Having “the New York Advantage,” and being “At the very center of business” has really paid off for Columbia, where they receive over 6000 applications annually for only 1000 slots.  With only three ivy league schools having an MBA program, being the only ivy league school offering an MBA in Manhattan essentially makes Columbia a unicorn.  Fewer than 18% of those who apply are offered a seat.  Even though Columbia is above the upper West side in Morningside Heights, they still manage to bring in over 450 guest speakers each year, so despite being a 30 minute subway ride north of Wall Street, their location remains their most treasured characteristic.
3)      Experiential LearningColumbia leads the way in utilizing both Theory and Practice in their MBA curriculum.  With a goal to create holistic business minds who see the bigger picture when analyzing complex business issues, Columbia goes to great lengths to train up their MBA candidates to connect the dots in the classroom.  Leveraging their location, Columbia can place students in the real world without disrupting the traditional classroom approach.  Columbia students are then expected to frame their analyses with an eye on the complex nature of globalization and social consequences, always mindful of how decisions affect both their local and broader communities.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us viahttp://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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MBA Snapshot: Kellogg School of Management [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2018, 23:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Snapshot: Kellogg School of Management
Kellogg, in addition to being the world's most famous cereal brand is also the namesake school of John L. Kellogg, the founder of the company.  The Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern remains solidly in the top ten business schools for a variety of reasons, but there are three key areas that keep the applications pouring in year after year…1)      Marketing prowessKellogg’s reputation for marketing expertise is so strong, it’s essentially considered to be the best in practically every single MBA survey.  Since the rich get richer, the school attracts only the best of the best faculty in marketing research and thought.  It’s no surprise that students who focus on marketing at Kellogg also land the most competitive jobs in that industry, but despite it’s prowess in marketing, Kellogg, like most business schools, launches even more careers in consulting (with marketing coming in second).  General management is also a popular track, so don’t think about Kellogg as a “marketing only” choice.  Think of its top ranking in management simply as one of the key attributes which has permanently cemented the school as one of the best respected business schools in the country.
2)      TeamworkOf course every business school touts its team environment, and indeed, working in teams is a critical part of any good program out there today.  But Kellogg basically invented it.  That’s right, every since 1908, Kellogg has been integrating collaboration into the curriculum, shifting projects and assignments into group settings vs. individual performance.  Over the years, most, if not all, business schools have emulated their innovative approach to business school students playing in the same sandbox.  Still today, students at Kellogg are evaluated mostly on what they deliver as a team, and in fact are essentially only given grades on an individual basis when it comes to class participation.  If you are more of an extrovert than an introvert, and thrive in an environment where you rely on others to help you learn, Kellogg would be an ideal choice.
3)      Fun-loving cultureKellogg is considered the fraternity/sorority of the business school world. Famous for their work hard, play hard culture, students enjoy an endless barrage of social activities outside the classroom, including weekly beerfests (called TG), ski trips, and parties galore.  They even have organized trips to other countries before classes begin, including not only students, but their partners as well.  If having fun is on your agenda for business school, you definitely should take a close look at Northwestern.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us viahttp://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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MBA Interview Prep - How to Answer "What Accomplishment Are Your Most  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jan 2018, 03:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Interview Prep - How to Answer "What Accomplishment Are Your Most Proud of?"
Our approach to answering a common MBA interview question, "What Accomplishment Are Your Most Proud of?"If you are in the midst of preparing for your interviews, congrats and good luck! If you need assistance, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com for a free consultation. 


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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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MBA Snapshot: Chicago Booth [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jan 2018, 20:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Snapshot: Chicago Booth
Chicago Booth is the second oldest business school in the US behind Tuck, so they must be doing something right.  Even without its prestigious location in Hyde Park near Lake Michigan, however, Chicago would still be highly desirable as an MBA destination.  Here are three key reasons the world counts Chicago among the coveted M7 business schools.1)      Research with an International ReachIt appears the longer a school has been around, the better known they are for academic research.  This may stem from longstanding traditions in academia, which far predate the modern MBA classroom.  But don’t think that Chicago’s academic research prowess means they are behind the times.  Chicago literally invented the Executive MBA, and understands better than anyone the importance of an innovative, global focus for business executives.  Their international focus, coupled with their penchant for heralded research has established a permanent level of respect in both business and academia.  Chicago’s dedication to international business research has also resulted in three additional campuses in London, Beijing, and Singapore.  It’s hard to turn on CNBC or Bloomberg Business Network without hearing a commentary from one of Chicago’s distinguished faculty.
2)      Quantitative PowerhouseIt’s no secret that Chicago’s MBA program is laden with quantitative analysis, so if you have Chicago on your list, you likely are self-selecting because you are naturally good at math.  Quant analysis at Chicago goes well beyond a good GMAT score, however.  Data analytics finds its way into almost every class in some form or another and is the primary decision-making tool deployed by students and faculty there.  Chicago’s reputation for finance and numbers long ago attracted the attention of A.C Neilson, a relationship and association which is still strong today. 
3)      Innovative ThoughtStemming from its roots in research, Chicago highly values the testing of ideas.  Chicago encourages all students to question assumptions and challenge ideas, but does so in an environment of collegiality, not competition.  In fact, there is a saying at Chicago, “Ideas compete, not people,” which frees students to disagree with and test each other in the classroom without fear of backlash.  Backed by the world’s most published and quoted faculty, Booth students are driven by a limitless thirst for rigorous problem solving by exhausting every possible approach before choosing the most appropriate solution.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us viahttp://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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MBA Snapshot: Fuqua School of Business [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jan 2018, 21:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Snapshot: Fuqua School of Business
The Fuqua School of Business at Duke University is the youngest business school in the top ten, yet has been ranked as high as #1 in BusinessWeek’s annual ranking.  Its youthfulness is reflected in a fun and collaborative culture.  A driver of the innovative classroom, Fuqua applicants clamor over the relatively small number of seats each year.  With one of the highest average ages among all business school students, Fuqua’s mature student body knows the value of experience.  Here are three of the most attractive characteristics of one of the most popular b-schools in the world.1)      Flexible, Student-Driven CurriculumFuqua doesn’t just like to see students involved in the curriculum, they require it.  One of the key questions to answer in the application process is, “how will you contribute to the program?”   Fuqua learned a long time ago that they have some of the brightest young minds in the world at their fingertips for two years, and to leverage them for Fuqua’s betterment would be good for everyone.  Students not only start and run clubs, they also work in all administrative aspects of running the school itself—they even conduct all the interviews for prospective applicants.  Putting students in charge of who gets in is a real vote of confidence, a compliment which is not lost on the students who lend their minds to the program.  This approach has resulted in one of the most thoughtful and innovative academic programs available, and they were the first school to creatively split up semesters into two 6-week terms, giving students the opportunity to take more classes than other schools.
2)      Teamwork, Teamwork, TeamworkTeam Fuqua is more than a clever name because business schools the world over have adopted Fuqua’s approach to collaborative business education.  Students are divided into study groups from the very first semester, and work together both inside and outside the classroom on practically every project and assignment.  With a mix of lecture, case study, and experiential learning opportunities, there is little left on the table to get students exactly what they need to ready themselves for a successful business career.  Team Fuqua is such a part of the fabric at Duke, students have even been known to give tips to classmates who interview for the same job.
3)      HealthcareWith one of the leading university hospitals in the country right there on campus, it would be difficult to find a better choice if your MBA goals include a career in the healthcare industry.  If you are not quite sure if a healthcare career is your target, Fuqua still offers the ability to add a Health Sector Management certificate to any MBA of 14 separate concentrations in the program.  To sweeten the pot, Fuqua happens to be located near RTP, or Research Triangle Park, a nationally recognized innovation center and home to leading pharmaceutical, biotech, and other leading healthcare companies.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us viahttp://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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MBA Snapshot: Sloan School of Management [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2018, 15:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Snapshot: Sloan School of Management
MIT’s Sloan School of Management benefits from the world-class reputation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, but don’t think Sloan lives in the shadow of MIT’s engineering achievements.  Sitting securely at the intersection of business and technology, Sloan has established a unique reputation as a respected business school in its own right.  Here are three main reasons…1)    RigorKeying off MIT’s reputation for attracting smart students, Sloan designed the core curriculum to really kick the tails of new MBA candidates.  Taking the same five challenging courses, students slave away from the starting gun at Sloan to keep up.  This brutal baptism by fire not only establishes a work-hard culture and toughens up students for what’s to come, but it also creates a tremendous amount of bonding, since psychologists agree that the depth of a connection is commensurate with the intensity of an experience.  The good news for Sloan students is, the core curriculum is essentially finished after this first semester instead of stretching over the entire first year like at many other schools.
2)    Working togetherCollaboration is a key mantra for Sloan, despite the breakneck academic requirements, possibly stemming from a long history of student-led startups which launch either during or after completion of the program.  Sloan knows more than any other school that solving modern business problems is not a one-person task, so it pushes students to work together through action-based educational opportunities both inside and outside the classroom.  If you enjoy putting your head together with other hard-working, smart achievers vs. going solo, Sloan may be a good fit.
3)     Hands-on learningIt’s probably a giveaway once you read Sloan’s motto “mens et manus” that getting proverbial dirty hands as a student there is a key to success, both in b-school and in life.  Sloan refers to their approach as “action learning” and involves cutting edge experiential techniques often found only in lab work or coaching environments.  Students lead consulting projects for local companies and go on excursions outside the classroom to apply theory in practice.  Remember how much fun field trips were as a youngster?  If you like learning by doing, Sloan is the place for you.
 
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us viahttp://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

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Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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MBA Snapshot: Stern School of Business [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2018, 16:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Snapshot: Stern School of Business
New York University is one of the most elite colleges in the country, so it’s no surprise that its business school is no different.  Stern’s diversely populated, highly energetic and hands-on students fit perfectly within its ideal location in the heart of Manhattan, the world’s business center.  While it’s no secret the school consistently falls in the top group of great b-schools, there are a few important reasons why they remain there.1)    Tried-and-True, balanced curriculumWhile finance certainly comes to mind when considering NYU Stern’s strengths, Stern has developed a classic business education, which yields strong general management graduates.  In a world where b-schools are all generally all trying to rush students through the core curriculum, at Stern, fundamentals are heavily emphasized in the first year, allowing students to marinate a bit longer before broadening their coursework in the second year with more customized content.  Grounding students with a solid foundation of universal business analysis gives Stern graduates the kind of confidence found only amongst the most successful business leaders.  This approach is particularly advantageous for students with little or no formal business education in their background.
2)    DiversityIf New York is the great American Melting Pot, then Stern is the melting pot of business schools.  Students benefit tremendously from a rich, multi-cultural makeup of students and Stern touts the fact that more than 50 different countries are often represented in the average class.  At 38%, the school also has more females in their class than almost any other school.   This kind of broad mix of students yields a tremendous amount of innovating thinking in the classroom, where students contribute from their own unique experiences to solve business problems in fresh and inventive ways.  If you are leaning towards a global business career post MBA, especially one that falls in the finance industry, you can’t go wrong with Stern.
3)    Location in the heart of New YorkThis attribute is pretty obvious, but you can’t really tout Stern without mentioning its location.  With the luxury of incorporating speakers who are the world’s most successful business leaders, Stern fully leverages its access to the many top companies in the city as well as visitors from other companies who find themselves so often in the busy business capital that is New York.  The cultural advantage of being in the Big Apple is hard to match as well.  From outings to Broadway, to dining in the world’s top restaurants, to simply touring the unique neighborhoods within the city that never sleeps, Stern students are literally enhancing their cultural experience at every turn.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us viahttp://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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MBA Snapshot: Tuck School of Business [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2018, 19:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Snapshot: Tuck School of Business
The Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College holds the distinguished title of first graduate school of management in the world.  Founded in 1900, the school was quite literally the blueprint for every business school that followed and remains solidly in the top tier today.  While there has been plenty of evolution behind Tuck’s hallowed doors over the years, the core values and traits which made Tuck a great business school have remained remarkably consistent.  Here are three features of Tuck which make it unique:1)    IntimacyWith class sizes under 300 students each, Tuck has remained relatively small compared to its peers, so the individual attention students receive not only from the administration and faculty, but also from their fellow colleagues is unparalleled.  The family-style culture is palpable, and faculty members are famously available for their students, which adds a very rich layer to their education and leadership development.  Unsurprisingly, Tuck sends scores of graduates to Wall Street and into the consulting world, both industries which are relationship-driven.  It’s also no wonder Tuck consistently ranks highest in percentage of alumni who give money back to their alma mater---the camaraderie that is built over two years of harsh winters makes for indelible lifelong connections with classmates.
2)    Location         In addition to being the oldest graduate school of business in the world, Tuck is also one of the most remote.  Nestled in the quiet woods of New Hampshire, it’s hard to find a better business school in a city smaller than Hanover, which posts a population of only 11,000 residents. This setting is extremely unique for business schools, which are usually found in bustling cities, or at least nearby a large business center.  Not so with Tuck, but it works together with their small class size to really drive students to bond.  When the bell rings, there are scarce few places to scatter, so students end up going to the same local haunts or even simply hanging around the Tuck facilities.  Similarly, Tuck students will also plan outings to New York or other larger places as a group, instead of slipping off individually.  If you want to build strong friends in your MBA class, there’s simply no better choice than Tuck.
3)    Management & LeadershipTuck has arguably the best general management program in the country.  They don’t always rank the highest in this category on public polls, but when you add in the softer elements, like the relationship building and communication skills, Tuck students graduate with an unmatched ability to run an organization.  Known for working with others well and strong leadership ability, Tuck students are often top on the recruitment list for Fortune 500 companies including Goldman Sachs, Amazon, and BCG among a myriad of others, which says a lot since these companies must all make the rather inconvenient trip out to Hanover to chat with them.  The real proof of the pudding, however is in the tasting, since Tuck typically ranks in the top five b-schools for career placement, often finding jobs for 95+% of their 2nd years by graduation.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via.
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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MBA Snapshot: Yale SOM [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2018, 21:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Snapshot: Yale SOM
If MIT Sloan is at the intersection of Business and Technology, then Yale School of Management is at the intersection of Business and Society.  With a strong commitment to the triple bottom line, Yale prepares its students to make a meaningful impact in the world beyond the balance sheet.  Here’s a snapshot of what Yale is most known for…1)    Non-Profit ManagementIt’s no secret that Yale SOM is synonymous with non-profit business education, but did you know that more than 90% of its graduates enter the non-profit world?  While Yale has a solid, integrated business curriculum (which was recently overhauled in 2006), the theme of community and society still permeate almost every class.  If you have no interest in working for a non-profit, the only problem you will have is perhaps getting the job interviews you seek at the end of your time there, since far fewer for-profit companies recruit there than at other schools.
2)    Small Class Size        Given its niche in the non-profit world, it makes sense that the number of applications and ultimately the number of students at Yale SOM would be smaller than average.  In fact, Tuck is about the only other school in the top tier with a smaller class size than Yale.  Besides all the benefits which come with a smaller student body, such as more attention from the career management folks, the opportunity to know everyone in your class (and even in the class ahead and behind you), and easy access to professors, perhaps the best news for Yale students is the improvement in its facilities.  Despite the new building, however, Yale is committed to keeping its classes limited to around 300 students.
3)    Brand Name RecognitionThere are better schools for finance or marketing, but if you’re going for cache, you can’t do much better than Yale.  Applicants flock from all over the world to apply to Yale purely on it’s history and brand name alone.  Unfortunately, these brand-seekers gum up the process for those for whom Yale is truly a good fit, which has forced the acceptance rate down to a hyper-competitive level.  As one of only six business schools in the Ivy League, Yale benefits from the collective rarified air which only thesest prestigious schools share.  Who cares if the other schools often outrank it on the b-school list?  How many people get to do to an Ivy League business school, right?
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via.

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MBA Snapshot: Haas School of Business [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2018, 22:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: MBA Snapshot: Haas School of Business
Young and cutting edge, this West-Coast school truly embodies the California culture.  Rolling out their “Defining Principles” in 2010, it’s hard to find a fresher approach to b-school than Haas in the top tier.  They’re not located quite as close to Silicon Valley as Stanford, but Haas continues to attract high-level, entrepreneurially-minded applicants who dream of changing the world.  Perhaps these attributes will highlight why.1)    EntrepreneurshipBerkeley probably benefits from their proximity to Stanford and Silicon Valley by catching applicants who use them as a backup plan for GSB, however they have built their own culture and reputation to the point that they now stand solidly on their own.  The school’s mission statement is “Leading through innovation,” and their prowess in management of technology is hard to top.  Coupled with their commitment to social responsibility (which would be difficult to avoid at a school like Berkeley), what you have are a very on-trend graduates who are highly sought in today’s sustainability-conscious business world.  Haas business plan competitions and entrepreneurial encouragement run through every class, so it’s hard to turn around without running into students who are working on a startup.
2)    StickinessMost Haas grads end up working within an eight hour drive of Berkeley, whether it be the attractiveness of the California lifestyle or the fact that Haas is more of a regional player in b-school world.  Still, this phenomenon is unique, and has resulted in a very strong network of alumni, as long as you do the same.  Students also connect at a deep level because Haas has one of the smallest class sizes of any school in the top twenty.           
3)    PrestigeIf you speak to anyone out West, you won’t find a more impressive name to drop than Cal Berkeley.  Essentially a public ivy, Berkeley’s brand opens doors and the success of its alumni has only added to the mystique of the school. Haas benefits greatly from Berkeley’s broader reputation and graduates of Haas enjoy tapping the larger network of Cal grads in addition to the smaller network of Haas grads. Even with all the California universities in the top tier, Berkeley rises above, so if you want to impress folks, open doors, get funding and start a business, Haas is a great choice.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via.
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Groundhog Day [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2018, 20:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Groundhog Day
Well, it's February, which means it's time to take a break from writing round three essays to re-watch Groundhog Day.  The 1993 classic Bill Murray comedy chronicles a day in the life of Phil, a weatherman who is cursed to re-live the same day over and over again.  As an MBA applicant, you can sometimes feel like this is also the curse of the application process.  Here are some tips to avoid the long and arduous grind...If you're like most MBA applicants, you are applying to more than one school. These days, it sometimes even makes sense to apply to five, six, or even more if you have the bandwidth.  At first, the process can be fun.  Re-visiting your experience and organizing your life is akin to Spring cleaning and can have positive effects even beyond applying to school.  It can reinvigorate your purpose and provide professional and personal swagger that may have waned in recent years or months.  But with more applications comes the risk of fatigue and the danger of making mistakes.
One at a timeIf you find yourself waking up each morning to the same application routine, there are several things you can do which will hopefully get you on track much faster than Phil the weatherman.  For starters, make sure you are only working on one application at a time.  Even though many schools have similar questions, by focusing on one school, you are more inclined to articulate genuine fit if you steep yourself in that school's culture and attributes.  
Set them asideSecondly, I recommend doing something I like to call "shelving" your applications.  When you finish that last essay, put everything aside and let it rest before you submit.  By shelving an application and moving on to another school, you can often return to that application later with a fresh perspective.  You can also sometimes incorporate additional tweaks that come from working on other schools.  As long as you manage your deadlines well, you can circle back and polish off your earlier applications with the helpful process of rumination and rest.  Of course having your consultant read your essays all together as a finished set is a great idea, which is easy to do if you follow this process of one school at a time and shelving.  
Don't cut and pasteFinally, you should avoid the temptation to cut and paste content.  Sure the theme of questions among schools can be similar, but cutting and pasting always risks two critical components of essay writing: 1) not answering the question, and 2) including irrelevant content/mistakes.  Even though questions may seem similar, if you really press in, you will find subtleties that warrant original composition.  Don't be lazy...you may surprise yourself when you re-write content that can work for multiple questions.  It forces your brain to take a different perspective and can even open up new ideas and better approaches to your story.  Try to pretend that you lost your other writing in a computer crash and take a fresh stab with each question.  If you go back and discover a really great way to express something---and it's so great that writing it any other way would be detrimental, then go ahead and use it.  But always go back and re-read the question to make sure you're not just taking the easy way out.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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Assessing Your Strengths [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2018, 14:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Assessing Your Strengths
One of the first steps in preparing for any job interview or business school application is to take an inventory of your strengths and weaknesses.  Generally, this is done via introspection and thoughtful reflection on things you have done well in your professional or academic career.  How about taking a more methodical approach?To gloss over a thorough investigation into your core competencies would be a real mistake if you are applying to business school.  Not only do you risk missing what’s truly unique about yourself, you also compromise a methodology,  which could in and of itself be considered lazy and unbecoming to a potential MBA program’s admissions committee.  You’re about to undertake the most intense two years of your academic life, so you should start in the application process to demonstrate a thoroughness and thoughtfulness that a CEO might show in their role leading a global corporation.
While it’s great to have a “feel” for where you shine, it’s a good idea to invest time into some tools which might help reveal your strengths in a deeper way. After all, schools will be keenly interested in what you bring to the table, and if you come across as cursory or shallow in your assessment of the personal assets and attributes you will offer in the classroom, you will fail to make the kind of indelible impression required to convince the adcoms you have the right stuff. 
The strengths assessment movement is nothing new, and goes back as far as there have been organizational psychologists. As a more accessible tool, however, the Gallup organization introduced the world to the original CliftonStrengths assessment back in 2001.  Renamed Discover Your Strengths, they released a book which became a New York Times bestseller and sold more than two million copies. The book was authored by former Gallup chairman Don Clifton (1924-2003), who was ultimately honored by the American Psychological Association with a Presidential Commendation as the Father of Strengths-Based Psychology. 
Clifton’s approach was to create a battery of questions which ultimately reveal one’s personal strengths across four domains of leadership: Strategic Thinking, Influencing, Relationship Building and Executing.  It’s not hard to see how useful it might be for business school applications and interviews to have a grip on where you fall inside these useful qualities, right?  Within each domain there are 8-9 themes which go into detail about the type of attributes people with strengths in that area possess.  It’s extremely revealing to take the CliftonStrengths assessment and often it helps unlock an applicant’s mind around exactly why they have succeeded in life.  Of course business schools care very deeply about the why, yet many applicants fail to ever present it in their applications.
CliftonStrengths recently became available as an app on iphone and android devices and is highly recommended, but there are plenty of other digital and book-based assessment tools out there.  The important thing is to take a methodical and data-driven approach to investigating your core competencies.    
If you decide to look into Gallup’s approach, for a general assessment, there is a stripped-down version of CliftonStrenghts for about $20 which takes about 30 minutes to complete and reveals one’s top five strength areas.  If you’d like to go deeper, a full assessment is around $80 and includes some follow up with the pros at Gallup.    If you put in a little effort up front, you might just elevate your entire application and be perceived by your target schools as a thoughtful, thorough leader—which can’t hurt!
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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Go For the Gold [#permalink]

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New post 11 Feb 2018, 14:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Go For the Gold
The Olympics are inspiring.  No matter what country you’re rooting for, the level of competition and amount of preparation and skill on display makes us all want to do better.  Leveraging this example during your business school application process can bring results worthy of a medal ceremony.  When choosing where you will apply, therefore, don’t be afraid to go for the gold.It’s not always easy to find the b-school that’s a good fit.  When it comes to choosing the right school, however, I always recommend going to the best school you can get into.  Often, applicants are put off by aspirational schools, thinking they shouldn’t bother applying because they are worried they can’t get in.  In the words of the old publishing clearinghouse commercials, though…”you can’t win if you don’t enter.”  While you should definitely manage your expectations when going for the “gold medal,” you should still include a few of your reach schools in the mix, even if it means putting in extra time and expense to prepare the applications.
Business schools are unpredictable in many respects when it comes to guessing which applicants they might choose to enter during any given season.The same candidate who is accepted one year might have been rejected in another.   This is because b-school admissions is a dynamic process and each year’s applicant pool varies widely in traits and demographics.  To balance their incoming cohorts, schools are always weighing out applicant profiles according to a myriad of characteristics, the details of which are impossible to guess. 
The economy also drives certain types of students back to b-school during times of drought or times of plenty. For example, when the economy is humming and unemployment is low, applicants from high-paying industries like banking and consulting are in short supply.  If you have the courage to abandon a good job during a good economy, you could perhaps get a gold medal from a school where you might otherwise have been out of the medal heats altogether.  This is a reason why reapplying to schools where you were formerly rejected can be a winning approach.
It’s never a good idea to only apply to the best schools, since every applicant needs a balance of aspirational and safety schools (and all points in between). But if you fail to include your reach schools in the mix, you may end up settling for a list of schools that you could have improved upon if only you had  been inspired to go for the gold.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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Fail to Prepare at Your Peril [#permalink]

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New post 20 Feb 2018, 21:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Fail to Prepare at Your Peril
Preparing business school applications is a grueling process, but there is another use of the word “prepare” which is far more important than the actual process itself.  How about this play on words: Are you making proper preparations to prepare your applications?Benjamin Franklin said it better, “If you fail to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” Another great president, Abe Lincoln famously quipped, “Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.”  Clearly these giants of achievement were proponents of getting your ducks in a row.  Unfortunately, what we see time and time again, is a client failing to do the appropriate heavy lifting before they dive in and start writing.
For every hour you spend writing an essay, you should have already spent three hours preparing.While there is sometimes merit in diving in and trying to pull your thoughts together on paper, there is also danger in beginning your essay writing process by trying to actually write the essay.  When you dive in with both feet, there is a temptation to over-value the time you spend writing and thereby convince yourself that what you have put together is good.  Human nature takes over and equates time spent with quality.  So no matter how well you think you have your story ready in your head, force yourself to do some “conditioning” just as you would do if preparing to ski the biathalon. 
Stuck on where to start preparing in the MBA application process? Build a matrix of your strengths and weaknesses. For example, on a blank sheet of paper, draw a grid and down the left hand side, as many key profile characteristics of the ideal MBA candidate that you can think of (for example, leadership, work experience, future vision, teamwork skills,  etc.)  Then across the top of the matrix, make an increasing scale (poor, decent, good, excellent).  In the ensuing boxes, write the things about yourself which either support or detract from that area.  If you have five-plus years of work experience, that’s excellent!  If you never got promoted in those five years, jot a note in the poor box.  This simple exercise can give you not only a mental survey of your strengths and weaknesses, but also a visual picture of where you need to focus your story.
Once you have a perspective on your core profile, write a statement of purpose.A statement of purpose is typically required for graduate programs other than business, but it’s a good exercise to undertake as you begin to get your mind around MBA applications as well.  The statement of purpose is basically a one or two page version of your story, but framed in this case about what has motivated you throughout your life to get to this next step phase.  Dig deeply into the “why” and know that it’s OK to skip some of the “what.”  Get personal as well, making sure you talk about your family and upbringing as well as other things that drive you outside of the workplace. 
Ultimately, the statement of purpose is a philosophical journey, a story of you, from which you can hopefully begin to extract the straw that will be spun into gold in the MBA application.  If you share your statement of purpose and your matrix with your MBA consultant before your initial consultation, you will both be much better prepared to tackle individual applications.  Feeling like preparing even more?  Make sure you read the recent blog post about assessing your strengths.  
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.

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How to Prepare for Your Wharton Group Interview (Team-based Discussion [#permalink]

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New post 21 Feb 2018, 22:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: How to Prepare for Your Wharton Group Interview (Team-based Discussion) - A Few Tips
For those preparing for their upcoming Wharton Team-based Discussion (TBD), we wanted to offer up some specific guidance on how to approach the group interview and your 1-minute pitch.  Most of our advice centers on how you can get a proper grasp on the program's cultural and curriculum related nuances, as well as the strategic direction (former) Dean Robertson put into play at Wharton. Mastering both the granular and high-level aspects of Wharton will allow you to tailor your 1-minute pitch on interview day, and not be distracted by what others (i.e. interviewees and their respective pitches) may claim as aligning with what Wharton wants to see. 
As a starting point, let's examine what Wharton wanted to see from it's class of 2016 R1 applicants (that is, applicants who applied 2 years ago in R1, Fall 2013).  Remarkably, Wharton kept a version of this question for R1 and R2 of last year's applications (that is, applicants who applied in R1 & R2, Fall and Winter 2014 - class of 2017).
Interview invitees were sent the following:
The Dean of the Wharton School, Thomas Robertson, has built a strategic foundation for the School based on Global Presence, Innovation and Social Impact.Wharton’s Global Initiatives focus on educating and creating new knowledge to provide students, faculty and alumni with the necessary tools to lead in the global environment.For this discussion, imagine that Professor Harbir Singh, Vice Dean for Global Initiatives at Wharton, has asked for your recommendation on an idea for a new Global Modular Course (GMC) or another global academic opportunity for 2015. Keeping in mind that the purpose of a GMC is to provide students with local immersion, course concepts and emerging business issues, please work as a team to come up with a global learning experience to help contribute to a new course offering following either the GMC format or some alternative. For more information on the GMCs that are offered, please refer to the Wharton website and the following video. Please come prepared to share your thoughts with the group in 1 minute or less before moving into the team discussion. You should plan to spend no more than one hour in preparation for this part of the process.
                                                                        
You should plan to spend no more than one hour in preparation for the Team-Based Discussion.(Note: I would never recommend anyone spend "no more than one hour" preparing for their TBD.)
The first thing you need to know is that you really should propose a Global Modular Course.Wharton's instructions do give you an out, but you have to consider that most of your fellow interviews will be preparing their GMC proposal as well.  Since you should know that you (and the group) will be tasked with coming up with a single recommendation (i.e. one defined GMC or one defined "global opportunity"), it's best to get past competing class formats and just focus on honing a GMC.  If you spend time debating whether or not it's even going to be a GMC (on interview day) you are wasting valuable time (as you will only have about 30 mins to come to consensus and pitch your proposal to the interviewers.)
The second thing you need to know is that it's not about your course or your idea, but about how you interact with others in getting to the "right" answer (i.e. single, agreed-upon GMC proposal).Do you really think that your Wharton interviewers (either adcom members or 2nd year students) really give a hoot about what your course is (as long as it's not bat-shit insane)?  The answer is "no."  What they care about is how you facilitate the consensus-building process.  So you need to go into this process with a "facilitator's" mindset, and not a "one right answer"mindset.
Now, make no mistake - there are better GMC proposals than others.  Invariably and during the interview, a few bad ideas will pop up.  You don't want to be the individual who knocks these bad ideas down.  You have to be much, more sophisticated than that.  This is why being a facilitator means understanding where Wharton is coming from, as well as where the school wants to go, so that you can guide the conversation back on course and look like a hero (comparatively).
The third thing you need to know is Wharton's history with Global Modular Courses, as well as its plethora of international options.In the very least, you should know the following about Wharton: 
Now let's back this up and take it to a slightly higher level so that we understand the greater context in which GMC and Wharton's international emphasis lay. Familiar yourself with the 3 pillars (again.)The following is also key to understanding the direction that Wharton is moving in.  For example - This may allow you to pick something that is of recent interest (at Wharton) and tailor it based on your experiences, as well as other add-ons (i.e. getting alums and alumni clubs more involved).
  • http://global.wharton.upenn.edu/organization/global-initiatives-research-program/
  • Global Initiatives Research and Teaching Materials Program
    The Global Initiatives Research Program facilitates faculty research related to global, cross-border or regional issues, including the management of multinational firms, competing in international markets, the interdependence of financial markets, cross national studies of entrepreneurship, understanding differences in buyer behavior across cultures and countries, contrasting manufacturing practices across countries, and more.
The fourth thing you should know is that most interviewees will struggle with getting their pitches down to 1 min.Approach this by revisiting the structure of each Global Modular Course.  Pretty much all GMC's last for about 3 or 4 days and involve a cross-section of industry players – from governmental to social to business related parties.  Think about who you would meet with on day 1, and what you would discussed during that high-level meeting.  Consider with whom you would meet with on day 2, and again, what you could discuss in a day.  Repeat this thought process for day 3.  Would it make sense for you to meet with each vested industry player on each separate day?  Probably.  Start from there, and keep whittling down the scope until you can get your concise pitch down to 1 min.
That's all for today's post.  We hope this provides you a foundation for approaching your Wharton Team-based Discussion, as well as its Global Modular Course component. If you would like more in-depth advice on preparing for the Wharton TBD - and would like to engage our interview preparation services, please contact us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com.
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Out of Time? [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2018, 21:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Out of Time?
So your friends have all been accepted to business school, but you haven’t even applied yet.  Think you’re out of time? This time of year can be exhilarating or maddening depending on your position in the application process, but if you haven’t yet applied to your target MBA programs, fear not---round three deadlines in some cases are several months away.  There are some schools who will even consider applications on a rolling basis well into the summer. 
If you find yourself in the rather unenviable position of applying in round three this year, know that as round three typically goes, this year should be better than most. The roaring economy and low unemployment rate has kept the volume of applications low and there has simultaneously been a dramatic drop in international applications to US business schools.  Typically, round three is very difficult one in which to gain a positive admission decision, but these factors will work in your favor as you pull your applications together. 
Know that most seats at top schools are already filled and it’s likely that schools have extended more than enough offers to prior applicants to round out their incoming class for the fall.Having said that, you must also remember that schools hedge against applicants turning them down vs. saying yes (known in business school world as yield).   Schools want every seat filled and they will generally err on the side of offering too many admissions invitations than not enough.  Somehow schools find a way to squeeze in an extra student or two, and they can always offer deferred admission to folks (similar to an airline overbooking a plane).  Schools rely on their own history of yield to determine how many invitations they extend, but it’s not an exact science, so if you feel you have a strong profile, it’s advisable to go ahead and submit round three applications vs. waiting until the fall. 
By strong profile, we mean you have a competitive GMAT score and a good story to tell. Having attended a top 10 undergraduate college is a real plus.  If you lack in any or all of these areas, you might have an uphill climb in round three, but you never know---perhaps you have an interesting hook in your story that will resonate with the adcoms, or will fill a gap in their student profile.  Schools are always hungry for a diverse class and often, round three is used to seek out the unicorns, or at least the type of folks they somehow didn’t see enough of in the earlier rounds.
If you are wondering if you fall into the unicorn category, reach out to us.  We’d be more than happy to give you a profile evaluation and speak frankly about how we view your chances.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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Taking the Round 3 Plunge! [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2018, 20:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Taking the Round 3 Plunge!
Whether you are a procrastinator, or you were simply waiting until you were ready and the time was right, round three is quickly rolling by.  Do you have what it takes in the most competitive round?If you have decided you will take the plunge and apply to school in Round three, there are a few things you need to know.  First and foremost, you must realize the odds of admission go dramatically down in round three because of the relatively few number of slots that remain.  This is simple mathematics—the lower the seat count, the more competitive it is to get one of them—think of it as musical chairs with way more people than chairs.

Granted there are fewer applicants in round three vs. rounds two and one, but not nearly so few as to make the ratio of applicants to available seats compelling.  Additionally, you must pass the sniff test against those on the waitlist.  Granted, schools need all their seats filled, but they will choose the best candidates available, and whether they come from the waitlist or from the third round admit pool is irrelevant to them.

So how do you navigate these choppy waters? 
One thing you must do is to make a very compelling case for why now is the right time to apply to school.  Even more than those from the earlier rounds, if you can convince the adcom that the reason you need to start this fall is a strong one, it will help them select you over someone who may appear to have time to wait.  This reason is different for everyone, but your job is to make them believe you cannot wait until next year—they will lose you to a competing school, and b-schools hate to lose.  Don’t help them push you into round one by giving them a reason why you can wait.

Next, you must dig for the attributes in your profile which make you a standout against someone else in your peer group.  Ask yourself why you should be chosen vs. the next accountant (or engineer or salesman, etc.) because you are being compared by the admissions committee against others with a similar background.  Sure, this is something you should do no matter when you apply, but let’s say for arguments sake, your target school has decided to let one more accountant in for round three—your uniqueness becomes much more of a factor now vs. round one or two, when there were several slots for someone with an accounting background.

Finally, you should have your recommenders speak to why now is a good time for you to return to school.  Whether it’s because you have climbed as high as you can, or because your contributions have been maximized, it never hurts to have a third party make the case for why now.  In case you’re not paying attention, the why now question is super-critical in the third round.  Make sure you are building a strong case to convince them to squeeze you in.

No matter what the round, to find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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Non-traditional Interviewing [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2018, 21:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Non-traditional Interviewing
Hopefully by now you are getting calls from your target schools to interview, but perhaps you are unavailable to go in person.  Check out these rules for undertaking non-traditional interviews and get the offer.So what is a non-traditional interview anyway?  Basically, any interview that is not conducted by an admissions committee representative, or is conducted in some way other than on campus and in-person could be considered non-traditional.  Most commonly, it’s an interview conducted by an alum of your school in a mutually convenient location.  Increasingly, it’s a skype or phone interview with someone on the admissions committee.  Sometimes, it’s an interview with someone outside the adcom or alumni world, such as a staff or faculty member. 
No matter which version of the non-traditional interview you might be offered, know that it’s just as important as sitting down with the director of admissions, because it’s likely the only chance you will get to connect live with your school. Although not ideal, interviewing outside the norm can be effective in making an impression. 
The most important thing to do is to take the interview seriously.If you approach a non-traditional interview with the same preparation and respect you would if interviewing on campus, you will come with the right mindset and set yourself up for success. 
Once you have the right attitude about the interview, you must remember to also present yourself in the same way you would if you were invited to meet with adcom members at the school.  If you would have worn a suit to that interview, wear one to this interview.  Even if interviewing on Skype, it is important to dress the same as you would if interviewing in the traditional way.  Anything less could make a negative impression, and since the “clothes make the man,” (or woman), your physical appearance will go a long way in communicating you are ready for b-school.
Speaking of Skype, make sure you take precautions to ensure your presentation is as professional as possible. Try to do the Skype interview in a neutral, quiet and well-lighted location.  Never set up with a window in the background, because the contrast will destroy the look.  Obviously don’t have barking dogs or music in the background, etc., and set the computer or camera on a riser, so the camera is not looking up your nose.  If you can pull it off, setup where you can be standing.  Standing up will make you more energized and is an edge you can have over having to do a traditional, sit-down interview.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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Waitlist Hell [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2018, 12:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Waitlist Hell
If you are one of the unfortunate few who are stuck in waitlist hell, there is some information you may not know that could make the time until you find out their decision more tolerable.

One thing applicants often want to know is how many people are on the waitlist at their particular school. Unfortunately, this is a black box and schools do not generally disclose an exact number of people who are waitlisted. Candidates on the waitlist may be admitted at any time, which makes the wait particularly painful, since unlike regular round admissions where there is a decision date or notification date, the waitlist candidates struggle with every day or week potentially being the day or week the phone will ring with an admission offer or a release from the waitlist.

In addition to being stressful for the waitlisted candidate, this also makes the number on the list fluctuate and difficult to track even for the schools themselves. When the pressure is too great, or when other offers are made from competing schools (or plans change), candidates and sometimes choose to remove their name from the waitlist at any point in the process. Therefore, the actual number of candidates on the waitlist can literally vary from day to day.

Because Admissions Committees limit the number of applicants who are extended a place on the waitlist, you are in good company with a relatively small number of fellow applicants, so make sure you remain on the list if you are still interested.  Due to yield dynamics and the fact that students can change their mind when they receive offers from other schools at the last minute, candidates can sometimes be offered admission as late as the day before classes begin. Every year there is a last minute shuffle of the deck, as students jump ship for their dream school who comes calling at the 11th hour, which obviously opens up a slot wherever they had already accepted.  Sure, they lose deposit money, but the chance to go where they really want makes it worth it. 
Despite the name “waitlist,” there are several things you can do besides simply wait for your dream school to call. 
From a strategic standpoint, sitting in a state of limbo gives you the opportunity to improve your profile or status as a candidate, and such improvements can and should be communicated to the admissions committees.

The way you do this is straightforward and usually as simple as sending a short email with the update (e.g. you were promoted at work, received some kind of community award or position, or got an A in that accounting class you were taking at the local community college).  It is important to note that you should never revise your application with any information which could have been included in the original application (so don’t submit things that you “forgot” to include—this would be considered poor judgment), but rather only new information or changes in your profile which are potentially interesting or important to your candidacy.

Most schools will also accept new GMAT or GRE scores from an applicant who has elected to remain active on the waitlist. Of course deciding to retake the GMAT or GRE may or may not be the right thing for you, but certainly if you feel that you did not perform on the GMAT at your highest potential, it might make sense to retake the test and subsequently submit the higher score.

When deciding to retest or not, sometimes it helps to view your performance on the test in light of your target schools’ 80% range (instead of its average score).   For example, a top tier school may post a 720 average GMAT, but the 80% range is 650-750.  If your score was in the lower range of the 80th percentile, it could indeed help boost your chances, certainly vs. someone else on the waitlist who is not re-testing. If you elect to take the GMAT or GRE again, make sure you tell your target school’s admission office so they can be on the lookout for your new score.  Obviously when you take the test, you will need to request the score be officially submitted to your school. It typically takes one to three weeks for the score to be received once requested.

One thing many candidates want to know is whether or not the waitlist is ranked and if so what their number is.  In most cases, schools claim their waitlist is not ranked, but even if you do not update the committee on any changes in your profile or GMAT scores, it is important at the very least that you inform the committee of your intention to remain active on the waitlist, since only those applicants who have elected to remain active on the waitlist will be considered for admission.   Each school has a different process, so make sure you reach out and touch base with them individually.

Schools generally reassess the waitlist with each subsequent new round of applications, but after the third round, there is clearly a long period of time until August when orientation starts.  Don’t lose heart, and remember to remain in contact with the adcom (in a thoughtful way, for example one touchpoint per month to reiterate your interest).  Who knows?  Perhaps that call will come.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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