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Amerasia MBA Blog

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Getting Organized  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2018, 16:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Getting Organized
Failng to get organized as you begin your MBA application journey is tantamount to failing on purpose.  Here's a few tips on how you can ensure you take the preparation for MBA apps as seriously as you take business school itself.Business school will likely be the most expensive endeavor you ever take to better yourself.  Not only are you shelling out a ton of money to attend a top program, you are also giving up on two years of good income.  If you are wise, you will think through the process up front, lest you end up hacking your way through the next several months with no plan.
First and foremost, you must be intentional about crafting a written plan.Don't simply spend a few minutes thinking it through---actually put your plan down on paper.  Often, utilizing a matrix and a decision tree can help you map things out. The matrix can operate as your checklist and the decision tree can help you make moves based upon as-yet-undetermined outcomes.  If you can get a batting order in place for all the to-dos on your b-school appication list, you will essentially free your mind up to think about more important things, like how to position your story.
This is going to sound biased, but getting a consultant on board early in the process is extremely helpful. Most consultants offer at least some kind of flat-rate option, so engaging them early costs the same as engaging them at the last minute.  When you partner with a professional application consutlant early, they will walk you through exercises to get organized with your thoughts and your actual to-dos, both of which will ultmately work together to position you in the best possible light for the admissions committees.  
Some of the early to-dos on your list include rounding up the documentation that will be required from each school such as transcripts, a solid resume, proof of citizenship and residency.  For some, these endeavors can turn into quite a hassel, so setting a calendar-driven timetable helps you stay on track.
When it comes to organizing your thoughts, you generally would start with self-reflection.This  includes potentially writing out a personal statement (or at least a paragraph about why you are wanting to return to b-school).  Often, the personal statement becomes the foundational document from which many of your core essays flow.  Work with your consultant to draw out the unique qualities of your profile into a narrative which weaves your past experiences together and forms a solid foundation for your future vision.
Organizing your future vision is one of the most critical components of a winning business school application.  MBAs are driven, crisp, and focused.  The inability to encapsulate your future plan in easy to understand language that is solidly connected to your past achievements is one of the most often cited reasons for rejection by business schools.  SImply wanting a better job or a higher level credential will not be enough to win the hearts of the adcoms.
Maturity is evident in a well organized and thoughtful presentation of your background.Lacking maturity is also an easy way to be dismissed from the process.  How do you demonstrate maturity?  Well, presenting an organized and clearly articulated vision that is not only realistic, but also offers an alternative plan (in case your plan A does not materialize) will show an adcom that you have been around the block enough times to know your're not a Pollyannish dreamer who relies soley on drive and ambition to get what you want.
So you see, being organized not only helps you in the application process, but also in the selection process once your application is submitted.  Business schools value a mature and organized applicant.  There's no better time to become one than as you start the process.
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Who Makes the Admissions Decision?  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2018, 15:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Who Makes the Admissions Decision?
Getting a yes from a top b-school is a mysterious process.  It helps to know a little bit about the folks behind the scenes who are actually making the decision.Most b-school applicants spend so much time preparing for and executing their applications that they never stop to think about the people who will be reading them.  Sometimes we forget that at the end of the day, it's real humans behind the webpage where you upload your content and it's real humans who are doing the analysis.  This often gets lost in a sea of GMAT scores and statistics, where we try to calculate our odds of admission based on historical data.
An admissions committee is typically made up of many people outside of the full time admissions staff.Particularly at top schools, your first line of defense is often a reader, or someone they pay on a seasonal basis to sift through hundreds of essays looking for the ones that will resonate with their school's culture.  In many cases, these readers do not have MBAs themselves, so using complicated business jargon is usually a bad idea when writing essays and resumes.  Application readers are smart, everyday folks who have day jobs elsewhere and are looking for good communicators with something to contribute to the class.   
If you don't grab the reader in the first three minutes, you've already lost the war.  Remember, these folks are pouring through hundreds of applications, many of which are HUM-dreads of applications!  Don't fail before you even get a chance to make it to the big table!  Classic mistakes are typos, over-selling, repeating what's on your resume in the essays and failing to expose yourself in a personal, compelling way.  Readers are trained to pick up on these things quickly, so be creative...but not too creative.  It's harder to go overboard like you could before the days of paper and pen applications, where I've heard tell of applicants who laced their packages with glitter or perfume.  In the digital era, it's still possible to make critical mistakes, however, so you must be careful to walk the line between pumping your stock and popping the balloon.  
Once you pass the readers, you are usually placed in a pile for staff consideration.An admissions committee is typically comprised of the full time admissions staff as well as key students who have been invited to participate.  Students have the boots-on-the-ground perspective of what a good classmate looks like on paper, so fluffing up your experience rarely passes the sniff test of a current MBA candidate.  
If you make it past the table discussion, you are typically entered into the pile for interviews.  This is exactly where you want to be, that is, in a position to argue your case in person.  But it all starts with the adcom.  
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Changes in Platitudes  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2018, 15:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Changes in Platitudes
Standing out in the application process at business schools requires a conveyance of your unique position in the universe, so using commonplace phrases or truisms are a waste of precious word count. A platitude by definition is a remark or statement that has been used too often to be interesting or thoughtful.  Most times, a platitude has some sort of moral message, and you’d be shocked how many we find in MBA application essays.  Even though they are not technically platitudes, using colloquial phrases or glib sayings are just as bad. Before you pat yourself on the back for finishing your essay drafts, make sure you screen them for the kind of banality that will get an eye-roll from the admissions committees.  Hint:  the worst offender?  “Thinking outside the box.”
You can scour the internet and find list after list of troublesome clichés, you know, the ones that really don’t mean something personal to you, but are over used to the point of queasiness.  There’s also a line you can cross in MBA essays that make it too casual and not appropriate for a formal essay.  In an effort to appear “real” or honest, applicants can sometimes fail by going colloquial-loco.  Here is a list I recently came across to help guide you towards the path of originality and away from trite, unoriginal doom.
 There’s no “I” in Team
Good things come to those who wait
It was meant to be
The definition of insanity is doing the same thing and expecting different results
Such is life
Everything happens for a reason
People are our most important assetIt is what it is
What the mind can conceive, it can achieve
Winners never quit
What doesn’t kill me will only make me stronger
Teamwork makes the Dream work“C’est la vie”
Hard work always pays off
Great minds think alike
Money can’t buy happinessLive each moment like it’s your last
If at first you don’t succeed, try try again
Reinvent the wheel
It’s not rocket science
It’s all good
What goes up, comes down
What goes around comes aroundDon’t assume – it makes an ASS out of U and ME
Don’t be sad because it’s over, be glad that it happened
What’s done is done
Waste not want not
Go with the flowRome wasn’t built in a day
Work smarter, not harder
We’re all in this together
Time heals all wounds
We’ll all be laughing about this soon
It’s doesn’t matter if you win or lose, only that you tryTomorrow is another day
It could be worse
If life gives you lemons, make lemonade
The best things in life are free
It wasn’t meant to be
Better to have loved and lost…than to never have loved at all
Better late than never
At any rate…With all due respect…
Laugh and the world laughs with you
People mostly regret the things they didn’t do
You can’t judge a book by it’s cover
Work hard, play hardOnly the good die young
All’s fair in love and war
The more things change, the more they stay the same
It’s the darkest just before dawn
Perception is reality
You can be anything that you want to be
Patience is a virtue
The customer is always rightIf you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen
Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm
Be careful what you wish for
With great power comes great responsibility
If you avoid these and similar phrases ( I think you get the idea), your writing will feel fresh and original.  Now get out there, think outside the box, and write some damn good essays.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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Putting all your eggs in one basket  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2018, 18:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Putting all your eggs in one basket
Risk and reward are directly related.  While you would rarely ever risk it all on one opportunity, when it comes to applying to business school, great reward can sometimes be found by betting on one single school.The phenomenon of the early admit application was first invented by schools who had trouble attracting enough applicants.  In an effort to woo MBA candidates away from more competitive schools, lower-ranked schools promised easier admissions hurdles if one committed up front to attend.  This backfired in many cases, with many admitted applicants simply walking away from their offers when they obtained slots at more attractive schools.  The increased application numbers, however, got the attention of several schools in the top tier.
Before long, schools like Cornell, Columbia, Duke, Darden and others began experimenting with an early action round…But this time, they learned from the mistakes of the market.  Top schools started adding various caveats to their EA rounds, such as requiring students to withdraw applications from other schools if accepted.  They also required hefty cash deposits to be made, the combination of which helped reassure schools the seats they offered would indeed be locked in. In exchange for committing up front to one school, the early action b-schools offered preferential consideration and even in some cases, rather generous accommodation for what would be perceived as shortcomings in the regular rounds. 
The early action option is not a panacea.If you have a crappy GMAT score, bad grades, and unimpressive work experience, no amount of accommodation or bar-lowering will likely get you into a top school, but if you are lacking in one single area and feel your profile is rather impressive in other areas, then it could possibly pay off to put all your proverbial eggs in one basket.  But how do you decide?
Firstly, you must ask yourself how happy you would truly be if you “had” to go to your EA school. Next, ask yourself if you would still feel happy there knowing you also gained admission into your other schools.  If the answer is yes, then you are a good candidate for EA rounds.  If you waffled on your answer, you may want to reconsider.  At the end of the day, you will get what you need in your graduate education experience at any accredited b-school.  You should be analyzing the subtleties of what you desire from your school and make sure that beyond the core education, your chosen school is providing you what you seek.  If that school has an early action round, well...lucky you!
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Applicant Strategy  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2018, 12:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Applicant Strategy
Now that applications have been released, it's time to get serious about your approach.  The moves you make now could impact not only your admissions decisions, but also your workload over the next few months.Hopefully you have already been working to prepare for application season.  You’ve had all summer to gather documentation, visit with former bosses and put some thoughtful cogitation into your story and how it will fit within various MBA programs.  School selection is one of the most important pieces of the puzzle; arguably the most important piece!  Even though choosing your target schools is critical,  you must also ruminate on the batting order of your application process.
Knowing not just where, but when you will apply can either streamline or radically disrupt your application approach.Firstly, there’s deadlines to consider.  Since there’s no standardization, of course every school has a different process and different timelines.  If you are targeting an early action program, you will clearly need to prioritize that school in your list.  This also means adjusting potential school visits and budgeting time for interviews down the road (hopefully).  Even schools who have regular first round deadlines, you have to come up with a plan of attack if you want to save headaches and stress when d-day (deadline day) comes.  Obviously, you can just arrange your workload to finish earlier deadline schools first, but this may be oversimplifying things.
Since it’s recommended that you let finished applications marinate before you submit them, you should come up with a plan to finish all of your applications early, giving you some margin on the backend to make adjustments.
One way you might consider approaching the order of operation is to “practice” on  your safety schools’ applications first.Often, MBA applicants use their second or third choice schools to flesh out their story and work the kinks out of the narrative, so to speak.  This approach pays off in several ways. Firstly, the pressure is off to get everything right up front.  If you were working on your top choice first, you would likely end up taking too much time to write essays and organize your thoughts, since you “have to get this one right.”  Utilizing a more casual approach on a couple of schools that you would happily drop if your real target offered you a seat will get you putting pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard), which is often a big hurdle.  Sounds simple, but writer’s block sets in early and often when you’re trying to sum up your life story and passion in just a few words.
Once you have a few core essays written for your alt-schools, you will likely begin to see holes and areas for improvement. Seeing how something looks on paper is a very effective way to ignite the creative juices to make it even better.  Of course, fleshing things out with a consultant or guide is a great way to hone your story in a way that makes it even more impressive or compelling.
Utilizing the process of shelving applications, or putting them aside without submitting them and working on the next school, allows for the story to marinate.  Working on schools one at a time helps you focus and stay true to each school's culture.  When doing this,  I have never seen a case where a client did not want to go back and make tweaks after working on subsequent packages.  Just like a painting or a film, the fine details and editing tweaks are often what make the difference between a masterpiece and a flop.  In any case, make sure you plan out the next several months on paper.  Get your deadlines locked in on your calendar and schedule time with yourself (actual appointments!) to sit down and work on specific tasks.  You’ll be glad you did so in the end.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact

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Time to Shine  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2018, 19:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Time to Shine
For decades, women and under-represented minorities were rarely found taking part in MBA programs.  Once the world figured out the value of a diverse marketplace and boardroom, however, the tables began to turn.  There is now no better time to apply if you fall in one of these categories.There was a time when a typical MBA classroom was 90% male and 85% Caucasian.  Today, it’s not uncommon for schools to enroll 40% or more of women and up to 30% or more of under-represented minorities. With a goal to get to 50% female, however, the competition amongst top schools vying for female candidates is fierce.  The result of this intensive recruiting has been a much more dynamic and insightful classroom and subsequently, a better business world.
The story is much the same for racially diverse candidates.African American applicants are in demand most of all because there are simply fewer applicants than there are seats for them at top schools--it’s classic supply and demand, which creates a near fervor, particularly over those applicants with an impressive profile.  For this reason, some of the best time and money you will spend as a diversity candidate will be on your GMAT prep.  If you are a URM applicant with a seven handle on your GMAT and good work experience, for example, you can pretty much write your own ticket.  Even if your GMAT score is lacking, the perspective you bring to the table in terms of diversity is so valuable to b-schools, that they will often accommodate here and there for profile shortcomings. 
Schools want their classrooms to be filled with voices from every walk of life, so the fewer voices like yours that are represented, the more unique your profile offering can be. Does this mean that unqualified applicants can get into b-school?—not at all.  A school may overlook a few points on the GMAT, but they still want to see a good score, or at least good grades in quant courses in college, which also demonstrates aptitude.  Work history is also critical for all applicants, whether you offer a diverse perspective or not, so no amount of cultural insight will make up for solid leadership and work experience.
In short, applying to business school requires the same rigorous list of accomplishments and skill that it always has, but if you also offer (in addition to that) a unique perspective which often comes naturally from being a woman or an under-represented minority, then you will have not only a shot at a better school, you will also have a shot at meaningful financial support in the way of scholarships and fellowships.  All I can say is, it’s about damn time.  Now get out there and take the advantage that has for too long been withheld.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

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Hanging By a Thread  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2018, 19:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Hanging By a Thread
When telling your story to the MBA admissions committees, it’s always best to weave everything together into a cohesive narrative which contains a compelling thread running throughout.  You might say your admission is hanging by it.No matter how checkered your background or how random your professional journey might be, it’s important to find the thread which ties it all together.  This can be troublesome for applicants, especially if your career moves have not been exactly progressive or related, so you may need to spend some extra time on the loom, so to speak.
Remember that the admissions committee is looking for passion and commitment, but that doesn’t mean you must have remained true to a single calling. If you are someone who has changed jobs or industries, then look for the common interest that drew you to each job and see if you can form that into an impetus or motivator for your future vision.  As critical as it is to have impressive work experience when applying to business school, it’s even more vital to know what you want to do with the MBA when you’re done.
In other words, it’s really how you tie your thread into your future vision which makes it all work. Business schools certainly care about your experience, and do want to see purpose and ambition in your professional track, but what’s even more valuable in an MBA application is casting a vision which leverages the passion and common theme of your prior career into what will hopefully become a meteoric post-MBA plan.  When you have a thread, and can tie one end to your early career and one end to your future plans, you will be creating a solid piece of cloth that the adcoms can neatly fold and consider thoughtfully, without shifting puzzle pieces around to make things fit. 
The more securely you can establish a thread which runs throughout your application, the less you will have to rely on the admissions committee to draw conclusions on their own and potentially misread your intended path or intentions. A solid thread communicates confidence and maturity, two very powerful and persuasive characteristics of MBA candidates.  And transforming yourself from an MBA applicant to an MBA candidate is the goal.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

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Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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More to Know  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2018, 10:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: More to Know
For anyone who has tracked Harvard Business School’s application over the years, it has been obvious the information they seek from applicants has diminished.  Now down to one question only, the HBS application makes it tougher than ever to get noticed.There was a time, about a decade ago in fact, that the Harvard Business School application looked a lot like other applications to top schools, with several essay questions designed to allow applicants to unpack their story and share impressive achievements.  As the years went by and the number of applications to HBS soared, however, it became clear to the admissions committee there that it was simply not sustainable to read 40,000 individual essays (three or four per applicant). 
Harvard initially addressed the problem by cutting down dramatically on their word count and for many years, Harvard was the stingiest of all top schools in allowing applicants to run away with the pen on their applications.  Applicants who violated the word count were often rejected outright, with the justification that their bypassing the rules demonstrated poor judgement, poor communication skills, or poor attention to detail, all of which were bad business traits for a group whom they generally expected to take over the world after graduation.
Finally Harvard took the laziest route of all:  eliminate the essay altogether.  They told applicants that they did not require any essays, but if there were anything you wanted to tell them, you could do so at your own discretion.  No word limits, no guidelines.  This sort of backfired on HBS as well, and they found themselves swimming again in an avalanche of amateur novellas. 
More recently, HBS has compromised, and has settled on one required essay:As we review your application, what more would you like us to know as we consider your candidacy for the Harvard Business School MBA program?
Again, there is no word limit for the HBS essay, but the key words in the question are, “more to know.”  These words are deceivingly simple, because when you look at the whole of the HBS application, you will quickly see the only thing outside this one essay that HBS is going to know about you will come from your resume and your recommenders.
For Harvard, the important thing to ask yourself is, “what are they looking for?”The answer to this question is largely revealed by HBS themselves; in short, they seek analytical leaders who are engaged in their work and community.  Resumes are good at listing what you do, but not why.  They show achievements, but not how they were achieved.  Certainly the how can often be addressed by recommenders, who hopefully will comment anecdotally on your approach to the job and how you get on with others. 
If it were me,  I’d address the why with my essay. Resumes and recommenders don’t often reveal the why behind the what, so it’s really only you who can unpack this important question.  Incidentally, it’s really in the why that who you are as a person is mostly revealed.  HBS and other top schools are trying to understand who you are.  If you approach their essay with this in mind, you will be ahead of the pack.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

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Find an Old Bear  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2018, 19:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Find an Old Bear
There’s an old story about a young bear who wants to venture out into the woods, but unlike his friends, he seeks counsel from an old bear first.  Have you applied this lesson to your MBA journey and your career?It often doesn’t make sense to young people to listen to old people.  Especially in today’s technology-driven society, older people are becoming increasingly irrelevant, according to the millennial generation.  What’s missing from this approach, however is the fact that foundational lessons in life have actually changed very little, and finding someone who has traveled through the woods before can be extremely insightful when it pertains to these core guidelines.
Another deterrent in seeking wise counsel is the time an energy it takes. Again, millennials have the cards stacked against them, since the entire world has been forcing on them bite-sized messaging and immediate gratification since jump street.  It’s really not their fault, and the frenetic digital pace of social media and easy access to information is a legitimate distraction. The good news is, if you take the time to find someone older than you, they are usually highly interested in helping---even if they may not be as savvy with electronic communication.  It's also far more insightful.
The truth is, there’s no substitute for mentoring from someone who actually knows you. You can’t get real counsel from a YouTube video or self-help book, but finding the right person to provide you insight and guidance that will really make an impact on your life choices takes some effort.  As you begin your MBA journey, you should think about bringing someone into your circle who has trodden the path already, someone who knows you personally and who cares about your success.  I have found that friends of your parents can be a treasure trove of mentorships.  People in your parents’ networks are usually just far enough ahead of you to know how the world works and are generally vested in your family’s best interests.  Take the time to meet with them in person and be prepared to open up and be honest about not only your dreams, but also your concerns.
While it’s always a good approach to seek professional advice on your actual application, an Old Bear can be a good person to listen to your story and career plans and give you an idea of how it might sound to the people who will ultimately consider you for employment after your MBA. Perhaps the most valuable contribution an Old Bear can make to your journey is to introduce you to other Old Bears.  The best part about networking with experienced people is that they know a lot of people.  Expanding your network through older professionals is a great way to build out a truly diverse group of supporters who provide the added bonus of maturity and perspective that otherwise is difficult to find when all your Linked-In contacts are at roughly the same career level as you are.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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One More Time  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Aug 2018, 18:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: One More Time
If you’re finding yourself frustrated right now because you are worried about MBA application deadlines, yet you still don’t have the GMAT score you want, know that there’s always the option to take that blasted test one more time.The GMAT is usually the bane of nearly every b-school applicant’s existence.  Unless you fall into the enviable category of standardized test guru, you probably have considerable anxiety with taking the test, much less the score you are able to achieve. 
The last thing you want to hear is that you should take the GMAT again.The dirty truth is, however, that it really does matter what score you get, and even a marginal improvement in your score can go along way with the adcoms.  Not only will an increased score help your target school’s average (if you are ultimately admitted), but an increased score will also communicate to the adcoms that you have the capability to work hard and achieve progressive results.
The really interesting thing is, even if you don’t improve your score at all, simply retaking the test will communicate to the adcoms that you don’t give up and that you are serious about trying to improve.  Particularly if you only took the test once, and didn’t get a good score, the adcoms might at best make judgments about your level of effort and in the worst case, question your true interest in going back to school at all.
So there’s a bit of political messaging that goes along with the practical side of test taking.  Kind of kills two birds with one stone, and in the end, there’s nothing to lose.  Schools only consider your highest score, so getting a lower score on a subsequent testing does not hurt you.  If you’re having trouble making the decision to retest, psych yourself up with these encouraging thoughts and then try to do something different this time around. Approaching the test in a new way can trick your mind into breaking through to a higher score.  Whether it’s prepping for the test in a new way, changing tutors, or simulating the testing environment at home before you take the real thing, you might surprise yourself with the results.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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Enhancing Your MBA  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2018, 21:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Enhancing Your MBA
Gone are the days of the standard MBA, because the 21st Century MBA is all about specialization.  How will you enhance your MBA to meet your career needs?Other than the JD/MBA, your father’s MBA was pretty boilerplate.  In fact, the MBA of the 20th century, while serving leaders well, rarely offered concentrations or specializations beyond the standard general management designation.  On the one hand, this was brilliant, since schools could claim that every graduate of their program is ready to handle essentially any business situation.  MBA graduates eventually became bosses, and bosses needed to be generalists by nature.  As long as they knew a little something about everything and mixed in a heaping helping of leadership skills, MBAs were off to the races up the proverbial corporate ladder.
The new economy has brought with it new demands for business leaders.No longer is it good enough to have a general understanding of business.  The intersection of business and technology demands graduates of top business schools to be tech saavy and entrepreneurially- minded. Schools have responded with a variety of innovative curricular changes including mini-mesters, allowing students to take more classes, additional coursework offerings in leadership and technology management.  Additionally, MBA programs all over the world now allow and even require students to choose a concentration or major area of study.  Beyond the standard areas of finance, marketing and operations, schools now offer students the ability to focus in cutting-edge areas such as IT management, supply chain, and data analytics.
Most importantly, MBA programs have opened up the ability for students to register for classes in other areas of the university. Supplementing a regular MBA curriculum with classes from the Law School, School of Public Policy, or college of engineering has allowed MBA candidates to custom-design their education and graduate with a very unique and customizable set of skills.  This allows MBA candidates to tailor their post MBA vision around a specific industry or area which can often position them in a very unique way for recruiters. 
Even HBS, the last bastion of the general management MBA curriculum, offers and even encourages cross-registration in other colleges and schools at Harvard.Breaking the one-size-fits-all MBA approach, while beneficial in many ways, can also create confusion amongst students and also with hiring companies.  There has never been a more important time to thoughtfully consider the design of your MBA coursework and to consult with someone who can help guide your thought process.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact

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THe Best MBA Program  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2018, 13:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: THe Best MBA Program
Choosing the best MBA program is different than choosing the best MBA program for you.  Let the rankings battle over the “best.”  Your only concern is finding the best fit for yourself.MBA applicants are obsessed with the rankings.  Year after year, we hear client after client worrying about getting into a “top ten” school, or fretting over settling for a “second tier” institution.  While landing a slot in a top program is certainly a great thing to pull off, you’d be making a mistake in attending a well-ranked school for which you are a bad fit.
What exactly does it mean to say a school is a good fit for you and vice versa?Put succinctly, fit is how well each school in your target list synchronizes with your individual traits and plans.  Fit, however, is much more complicated than that and entails several areas.  Firstly, your fit within a program needs to line up academically.  A simple example is, if you can’t score well on the quant section of the GMAT, you won’t be happy with Wharton or Chicago (or several other quant-heavy schools for that matter).  It’s unlikely these schools will think you are a good fit either and for good reason; if you would struggle to keep up in class, not only will you be miserable, you will also make your classmates miserable. And that’s a bad combo.  There are other programs who hold your hand a little more as you get back up to speed with the quantitative analysis.  Make sure you are looking at academic fit when you build your list of target schools.
Another key element of fit is professional.  Does the school you are targeting have expertise in preparing students specifically for the area or industry you seek after business school? Sure, all accredited MBA programs provide core education in the elemental disciplines, such as finance, accounting, marketing and operations theory, but you need to look deeper into the curriculum to ascertain professional fit.  A good habit is to talk with each school’s career center where you can discover how well that school connects with recruiters in your chosen post MBA career area.  Not seeing any of your target employers on the list?  This might be an indicator that the school is a poor professional fit for you.
The last key area is the most ethereal: cultural fit.  Just like every undergraduate program has a unique feel and personality, the same goes for business schools. 
While this may sound a bit touchy-feely, you’d be surprised how important it is to align with a school’s core mission and approach to MBA education.  Are the students more independent or team-oriented?  Are the professors amicable and approachable, or distant and unavailable?  In addition to the feel of the classroom, it’s always best to visit a school during session and inquire about what goes on with students after class.  Do they scatter to the four winds or do they stick together for activities, both social and academic in nature?  Once you get a feel for a school’s culture and philosophy, you can ask yourself how well you align with it.  In the end, you’ll be linked to your MBA program for the rest of your life, so make sure you can see yourself still wearing the sweatshirt when you’re old and gray!  That’ ultimately the best MBA program of all---the one that makes you the most satisfied in the long term.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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The Best MBA Program  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2018, 14:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: The Best MBA Program
Choosing the best MBA program is different than choosing the best MBA program for you.  Let the rankings battle over the “best.”  Your only concern is finding the best fit for yourself.MBA applicants are obsessed with the rankings.  Year after year, we hear client after client worrying about getting into a “top ten” school, or fretting over settling for a “second tier” institution.  While landing a slot in a top program is certainly a great thing to pull off, you’d be making a mistake in attending a well-ranked school for which you are a bad fit.
What exactly does it mean to say a school is a good fit for you and vice versa?Put succinctly, fit is how well each school in your target list synchronizes with your individual traits and plans.  Fit, however, is much more complicated than that and entails several areas.  Firstly, your fit within a program needs to line up academically.  A simple example is, if you can’t score well on the quant section of the GMAT, you won’t be happy with Wharton or Chicago (or several other quant-heavy schools for that matter).  It’s unlikely these schools will think you are a good fit either and for good reason; if you would struggle to keep up in class, not only will you be miserable, you will also make your classmates miserable. And that’s a bad combo.  There are other programs who hold your hand a little more as you get back up to speed with the quantitative analysis.  Make sure you are looking at academic fit when you build your list of target schools.
Another key element of fit is professional.  Does the school you are targeting have expertise in preparing students specifically for the area or industry you seek after business school? Sure, all accredited MBA programs provide core education in the elemental disciplines, such as finance, accounting, marketing and operations theory, but you need to look deeper into the curriculum to ascertain professional fit.  A good habit is to talk with each school’s career center where you can discover how well that school connects with recruiters in your chosen post MBA career area.  Not seeing any of your target employers on the list?  This might be an indicator that the school is a poor professional fit for you.
The last key area is the most ethereal: cultural fit.  Just like every undergraduate program has a unique feel and personality, the same goes for business schools. While this may sound a bit touchy-feely, you’d be surprised how important it is to align with a school’s core mission and approach to MBA education.  Are the students more independent or team-oriented?  Are the professors amicable and approachable, or distant and unavailable?  In addition to the feel of the classroom, it’s always best to visit a school during session and inquire about what goes on with students after class.  Do they scatter to the four winds or do they stick together for activities, both social and academic in nature?  Once you get a feel for a school’s culture and philosophy, you can ask yourself how well you align with it.  In the end, you’ll be linked to your MBA program for the rest of your life, so make sure you can see yourself still wearing the sweatshirt when you’re old and gray!  That’ ultimately the best MBA program of all---the one that makes you the most satisfied in the long term.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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Facilities Showdown  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Sep 2018, 20:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Facilities Showdown
Tepper has just announced the completion of a $200 Million center for entrepreneurship at the center of campus.  Will there ever be an end to the great MBA facilities showdown?The past decade has seen an incredible surge in bigger, better MBA facilities across the nation and the world.  Once this kind of arms race begins, it’s hard to stop, because students quickly get spoiled and applicants quickly come to expect cutting edge offerings----a real “nothing but the best will do” approach to school selection.
While at the undergraduate level, there are several bastion institutions holding tight to wooden desk and chalkboard traditions, it’s been more difficult to do this at the graduate level.  One reason is, the perception of antiquated buildings and finishes don’t equate to the fast-paced nature of the “speed of business.”  This perception can negatively influence prospective students’ opinions of an MBA program to the point that they might even rule out a particular school purely based on the physical environment where they will spend their two years.  Additionally, MBA applicants are usually five or more years into their post-undergrad careers and have become accustomed to class-A office workspace.  This acclimation can make it very difficult for them to choose a school whose classroom spaces aren’t up to date.
It seems very superficial for applicants to make decisions based on aesthetics, but the data backs up the premise.  Just this past season, for example, University of Texas saw a surge in matriculation after the completion of a brand new, state-of-the-art facility.  Note this was not a surge in applications, but actually an increase in students choosing to attend McCombs, which implies that applicants made their decisions after visiting campus and seeing the building.  This kind of measurable impact influences other schools to do whatever is necessary to raise funds to compete.  New facilities can even put schools on the map who were less known.  Rumor has it that Scheller College of Business at Georgia Tech has plans to build an 18-story MBA tower in the heart of Midtown Atlanta, which should really put them on the map given their already enviable location nearby dozens of Fortune 500, 100 and 50 companies.
Despite the allurement of super-sexy skyscrapers, however, MBA applicants should guard themselves against sacrificing fit for facility.  While great facilities are nice, it would be far better to go to a school with tired spaces, yet one that aligns perfectly with your profile and career vision, vs. one with a brand new building, which is unable to get you what you want either academically or professionally.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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Following Up  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2018, 17:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Following Up
Applying for MBA programs means lots of contact with others.  Students, Alumni, Faculty and Admissions representatives will all float in and out of your schedule during the peak months.  Don’t forget to follow up with them if you want to make the best impression.We were all trained to be polite, so you’d think that following up with a simple thank you would be second nature, but in the hustle-bustle of the digital age, it’s all too common for such niceties to slip through the cracks.  Believe it or not, schools take notice when you follow up with them, for mainly one reason:  it’s what you’d be expected to do as a professional in the post MBA world.
Business schools love it when you demonstrate the skills of a leader up front.   Sure, MBA programs are great places to hone your leadership skills, but having some good raw material on the front end is what separates the good applicants from the bad---and you definitely don’t want to end up in the latter pile.  In addition to the stuff on your resume and the engagement with your community, schools like to see the kind of skills becoming a c-level executive.  This means being polite, courteous, thoughtful and thankful.  And make sure you ask for business cards so you can leave any meeting with the person’s contact information.
What is the most appropriate way to follow up?If you’re dealing with official school representatives, whether it be admissions committee members, school staff, or even alumni interviewers, at the very least, you should be emailing a note of thanks after any encounter.  An even better touch is if you can get something hand-written to them in the mail.  A good rule of thumb is to invest in some nice (but not flashy) personalized stationery and keep it by your desk along with a quality pen.  Don’t use the pen for any other purpose, so it’s always there on the ready.  This will encourage a habit-forming process of reaching out to those helpful folks you encounter in your application process.
Timing is of the essence, but don’t think that means you must reply immediately.I personally feel especially with electronic notes, that waiting a couple of days is best.  When you send a quick “thanks” from your phone in your Uber away from the school visit or office meeting, it feels rushed and perfunctory.  When you wait a couple of days, it not only communicates that you are thinking about them well after your encounter, but it also forces them to think about you as well.  Business school reps encounter thousands of prospective students each season, so reinforcing your encounter later in the week will keep you in their thoughts longer than someone who bolts-on a thank you to the actual encounter itself (by sending it immediately).  If you are the kind of person who like to go ahead and get such tasks done as soon as possible, then simply delay delivery on your email system for a couple of days out.
Written cards are another story altogether, so when writing someone, don’t delay.  Because snail mail can take several days and then on-campus mail delivery another few days after that (recall from your undergraduate days that each school has its own post office on campus which handles all incoming mail), you should write, stamp and send your written correspondence as soon as possible after your meeting.  This should result in your message arriving within a week of the encounter, which is a good rule of thumb for sending thanks of any kind.   
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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Interview Prep  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2018, 15:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Interview Prep
When the fall season creeps in, MBA hopefuls everywhere pray for the elusive interview invitation.  But you don’t have to wait for the invite to start getting ready.  Here’s how.MBA interviews are not job interviews.  This one truism will serve you better than a bevy of advice from MBA veterans.  The key difference between an MBA interview and a job interview is that business schools are not trying to figure out what you can do or what skills you have (they will help you improve both), rather they are trying to figure out who you are.  Most jobs don’t really care much about who you are. Sure, they might ask you what you do for fun, but it’s mostly a courtesy question.
Who Are You?The best thing to do when waiting for the invitation to interview is to put some thoughtful analysis into this question: who are you?  I always find a helpful exercise to this end is to write a personal statement.  Perhaps you already did this as an exercise when creating your application, but if not, it can’t hurt to walk through your story on paper.  Remember to focus on why you have done the things you have done, not just what you have done.  The interviewer can get all the what that they need from your resume.
Another helpful exercise when preparing for interviews is to work on your brevity.  One of the biggest faux pas in the interview process is rambling.  Particularly when “walking through your resume” or “telling someone about yourself,” the tendency of human nature (particularly when nervous), is to go on too long.  I find a helpful tool to prevent this is to simply touch on a few highlights and then ask the interviewer the following question: “Is that what you were looking for?  Where would you like me to dive in deeper?”  Asking the interviewer questions will make the time with them more like a conversation.
You might want to practice some questions you can lob out during the interview. Don’t just wait until the end when you will inevitably be prompted for questions “that you might have for us?”  Leverage the interrogatory approach to get your interviewer into a dialogue, which will help you remain lodged in their brain a bit longer perhaps than another of their dozen interviews that week.
One key thing to do when preparing for your interview is not to over-prepare.  Bringing in rehearsed, or canned answers will definitely have poor results.  While it would be risky to be entirely off the cuff, you must learn to find the sweet spot between pulling stuff out of thin air and reading a pre-meditated response from a notebook.  A good practice is to run through some typical interview questions casually, either on your own, or with someone else, speaking from the heart, and not taking notes.  If you can find someone to chat with about your MBA hopes and dreams, vs. conducting an actual mock interview, you might find the approach helpful when you sit down for real.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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How to Bomb an MBA Interview  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2018, 18:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: How to Bomb an MBA Interview
There’s lots of opinions on how to ace the MBA interview, but here’s ten things to avoid if you really don’t want to blow it.Interviewing for a seat in a top MBA program can be nerve wracking.  Especially if the school where you’re interviewing is your top choice, it’s hard to imagine a more intimidating situation.  I mean, your whole future is riding on it, right?  Not exactly, but that’s how it can feel.
There are several subtle ways you can end up blowing an MBA interview without even realizing it. Most of these will seem fairly obvious, but you’d be surprised how many happen anyway.  Try to avoid doing the following:
1)      Being late.  Schools will take notice if you’re not on time.  Punctuality is next to godliness, so if the interview is in a town where you’re unfamiliar with the territory or parking situation, build in extra time to get there without stressing yourself out.  You’ll thank yourself.
2)      Dressing inappropriately.  Clearly you don’t want to be underdressed, but this can also work in the other direction---that is, being overdressed.  If the school says to come business casual, don’t wear a suit-and-tie lest you be perceived as either trying too hard or unable to follow directions, both of which are detrimental to your admission chances.
3)      Not answering the question.  Yes you want to make sure you get your message across to the interviewer, but don’t take so much liberty with your answers that you end up missing the original questions altogether.
4)      Forgetting to brush your teeth.  Bad breath is gross and nervousness can cause bad breath.  Bring some mints or gum to chew before you go in.
5)      Passively answering questions.  B-schools expect to see businesslike behavior and leadership qualities, so think of yourself as playing an equal role in guiding your interview process.  If the questions they ask are not allowing you to put your best story forward, make your answers more brief and then add on information you feel is more germane to your case for admission.
6)      Asking poor questions.  Everyone gets a chance in an interview to ask questions at the end to your interviewer.  Come prepared with thoughtful questions that you can’t have found the answer to from the school’s website.  Think in advance of several questions—more than you feel you will have time to ask.  You might surprise yourself.
7)      Forgetting a paper and pen.  Always come to an interview with a notepad and pen.  This is business meeting 101.  A good leader always has a way to take notes, and you want to be perceived as a good leader of course.
8)      Failing to be nice to your fellow applicants.  Business schools are all about teamwork, so if you’re aloof or rude to any fellow applicants you encounter during your visit, it will be a sure way to blow your chances.
9)      Forgetting to ask for a business card.  Following up on the interview is important, but you can’t do that without contact information.  Business cards are great because they also have the person’s preferred name (spelled correctly) and their address for handwritten notes.  Sometimes this information is hard to find on the website.
10)  Not being yourself.  This is the number one unforgivable sin.  If you try to game the interview and tell them what you think they want to hear instead of genuinely being yourself, you’re taking a big risk.  Schools use the interview to get to know you, but if you’re hiding behind canned answers or false pretenses, this critical step in the process never happens.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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Inside Man  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Sep 2018, 11:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Inside Man
They say it’s not what you know, but who you know that makes the difference.  This also can be the case with MBA applications.  Are you leveraging people on the inside to increase your odds of admission?When applying to top business schools, it’s often the case that applicants don’t know anyone at the school.  This shouldn’t necessarily stop someone from finding an “inside man” to be your advocate, particularly if you believe in the six degrees of separation theory.
If you’re headed for MBA world, you no doubt have a Linked-in profile with over 500 contacts, right?  Linked-in is a great place to start when trying to discover contacts inside a particular school.  Do a search for your target school in your contact base and see who may be among the alumni ranks.  Setting up a casual, informational interview is usually all it takes to get the floodgates cracked open.  That one person in your circle who went to Wharton is going to know several more, and eventually, you will find a way to connect with current faculty and students.  It’s not generally customary to try and elbow your way into an insider who is actually on the admissions committee, so only reach out to such folks if you truly know them already.  Schools frown on applicants gaining an unfair advantage, but they respect anyone obtaining a fair one.
You can also reach out to the schools directly.  Requesting time with a faculty member or a current student to give you some perspective is often something that will be accommodated by the admissions office.  Taking initiative to get to know your target school makes a good impression and demonstrates genuine interest.  Always act with humility and appreciation if given the opportunity to meet with anyone connected with your target school.  If it feels appropriate, you can even ask them to advocate for your admission in whatever way they think makes sense.
Schools will generally ask you during an interview what steps you have taken to get to know the school.One of the best ways to demonstrate such effort is to have spoken with students, faculty, staff and alumni contacts.  Schools assume you are doing your homework and putting in some effort up front to educate yourself on how well you would fit within a program.  Simply reading the website and going on the tour will not really impress anyone.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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Don't Overwhelm the Adcoms  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2018, 13:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Don't Overwhelm the Adcoms
It’s great to be creative when applying to business school, but don’t go overboard or you might turn off the adcom altogether.Let’s face it:  it’s getting difficult to get attention these days from business schools.  Especially since the major league adcoms have been shrinking their staff ranks from budget cutbacks, they are processing more applications with fewer people behind the scenes. 
Eventually applications start looking the same.In the old days, before digital submission requirements, you could send in your application in a larger envelope, or printed on linen paper, for example, to impress the reader.  This eventually got out of hand, with perfumed paper or glitter coming out of a package from an over-zealous applicant who was well-meaning, but off-base ultimately in their approach. 
Nowadays, it’s more common for applicants to attempt to contact the admissions director or someone on the admissions team to hound them about their status.  While it’s a great idea to connect with the admissions office (and everyone should be scheduling an on-campus visit to include a stop-by at the admissions office), being belligerent about it can really backfire hard.  Never assume a level of familiarity with anyone on the admissions staff beyond that which is offered by them.  Should you send a thank you note?  Yes!  Should you try to friend them on facebook?  No. 
A good dose of common sense applies here.While it may seem like a fine line to walk, just make sure to think things through before you overwhelm the adcom with information about yourself.  In the end, schools frown on any attempt to gain an unfair advantage, but welcome earnest efforts to connect like everyone else. 
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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The MBA Trust Fall  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2018, 12:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: The MBA Trust Fall
Ever been to summer camp and done a trust fall?  It’s where you cross your arms, surrounded by friends, stiffen your body, close your eyes and fall backwards from a table or chair, trusting your mates will catch you.  Relying on your MBA recommenders is much the same.One of the scariest parts of your MBA application is your reliance on your recommenders.  Largely because it’s best to waive your right to read your recommendations (schools will put more stock in them if you do this and will be more suspicious of your application in general if you don’t), you must trust that your recommender truly has your best interests at heart. 
Choosing your recommenders wisely is one of the best things you can do in the MBA application process.This gets a bit tricky, since there are many people in your life who are shameless promoters of your every achievement (think favorite uncle, mom, dad or work mate), but these folks make horrible recommenders, because there is a clear and present bias in anything they might offer up about you.  This is difficult particularly for people who work for a family business, since business schools want to hear from your direct supervisors.  If your direct supervisor is a family relative, then it’s a true catch 22.  If you are someone in this situation, look to trusted vendors or clients of your family business and make sure you communicate the circumstances in your application (often in the optional essay). 
Most applicants to MBA programs are in a regular job, with a boss or supervisor in the more traditional sense.  But do you trust your boss?  Perhaps your boss loves you as a subordinate and therefore doesn’t want you see you leave for two years to get your MBA.  Or perhaps your boss never got her MBA and feels intimidated or threatened by your audacity to break out and better yourself.  The real rub is, there’s often no way to ascertain the answers to these questions.  Think about it—how well do you really know your boss? 
The best case is of course, that you have a boss you not only trust, but who also truly wants you to succeed and pursue your MBA plans.  If this is the case, you should still consult directly with your boss or supervisor about what those specific plans are and why you think you are now equipped to pursue them.  Remind your boss of situations at work where you have excelled and demonstrated teamwork, leadership and thoughtful analytical skills.  You are trusting someone too much if you simply ask them to recommend you and then forward the link to the questions. 
Outside of your immediate supervisor, you still must find more recommenders in most cases.Unless you are fresh out of school, using favorite professors is usually not a good idea, so where do you turn?  Past supervisors or bosses are often a good idea, especially if you left your last job on a good note with impressive achievements to pursue a higher level opportunity, for example.  Don’t worry about going deep into your past.  If you have a trusted former boss, no matter how long ago it was, it’s better than using a former colleague or friend.  We can discuss with you in more detail how to best line up your recommenders, so give us a shout.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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