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Amerasia MBA Blog

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Achievement  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2018, 16:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Achievement
We’ve heard about achievement all our lives, from our parents, teachers and friends.  Just when you were feeling pretty good about yourself, it’s time to measure up once more as you prepare your MBA applications. Even before we started kindergarten, our parents were applauding our every achievement as a way to encourage good behavior.  Once school began, it became even more obvious—heck, even the aptitude test we all took as youngsters was called the CAT, or California Achievement Test.  Let’s face it, America is a pretty darned competitive place, and now the face-off includes applicants from all over the world who vie for a coveted seat in one of the top b-schools.  Business schools value achievements for the same reasons you, your parents and your teachers do---it demonstrates drive, initiative and ability, all of which are valuable assets in an MBA program. 
The main problem with achievements, however, is that everyone applying to b-school has buckets full of them. And boxes, and closets, and basements.  Yes, if you are applying to business school, through simple self-selection, you are likely also someone who has too many achievements, not someone who doesn’t have enough.  You will soon be faced with the tiny little word count boxes online where you must decide which of these achievements throughout your life are most important to you.  Those last two words are key:  to you. 
Don’t make the mistake of trying to decide which achievements will impress the admissions committees, or even what will make you look good for your chosen post MBA career. Think about what best reflects you as a person---find the stories in your achievements and unpack them in a way which reveals passion and defines what makes you tick.  In the end, this is what business schools are looking for.  Setting yourself apart means not listing the same old achievements that everyone else does.  Really challenge yourself to reflect on your past goals and dreams and dig up the moments that define you and put you on a visionary road to your future self. 
 
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

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Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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Getting Organized  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2018, 17:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Getting Organized
Failng to get organized as you begin your MBA application journey is tantamount to failing on purpose.  Here's a few tips on how you can ensure you take the preparation for MBA apps as seriously as you take business school itself.Business school will likely be the most expensive endeavor you ever take to better yourself.  Not only are you shelling out a ton of money to attend a top program, you are also giving up on two years of good income.  If you are wise, you will think through the process up front, lest you end up hacking your way through the next several months with no plan.
First and foremost, you must be intentional about crafting a written plan.Don't simply spend a few minutes thinking it through---actually put your plan down on paper.  Often, utilizing a matrix and a decision tree can help you map things out. The matrix can operate as your checklist and the decision tree can help you make moves based upon as-yet-undetermined outcomes.  If you can get a batting order in place for all the to-dos on your b-school appication list, you will essentially free your mind up to think about more important things, like how to position your story.
This is going to sound biased, but getting a consultant on board early in the process is extremely helpful. Most consultants offer at least some kind of flat-rate option, so engaging them early costs the same as engaging them at the last minute.  When you partner with a professional application consutlant early, they will walk you through exercises to get organized with your thoughts and your actual to-dos, both of which will ultmately work together to position you in the best possible light for the admissions committees.  
Some of the early to-dos on your list include rounding up the documentation that will be required from each school such as transcripts, a solid resume, proof of citizenship and residency.  For some, these endeavors can turn into quite a hassel, so setting a calendar-driven timetable helps you stay on track.
When it comes to organizing your thoughts, you generally would start with self-reflection.This  includes potentially writing out a personal statement (or at least a paragraph about why you are wanting to return to b-school).  Often, the personal statement becomes the foundational document from which many of your core essays flow.  Work with your consultant to draw out the unique qualities of your profile into a narrative which weaves your past experiences together and forms a solid foundation for your future vision.
Organizing your future vision is one of the most critical components of a winning business school application.  MBAs are driven, crisp, and focused.  The inability to encapsulate your future plan in easy to understand language that is solidly connected to your past achievements is one of the most often cited reasons for rejection by business schools.  SImply wanting a better job or a higher level credential will not be enough to win the hearts of the adcoms.
Maturity is evident in a well organized and thoughtful presentation of your background.Lacking maturity is also an easy way to be dismissed from the process.  How do you demonstrate maturity?  Well, presenting an organized and clearly articulated vision that is not only realistic, but also offers an alternative plan (in case your plan A does not materialize) will show an adcom that you have been around the block enough times to know your're not a Pollyannish dreamer who relies soley on drive and ambition to get what you want.
So you see, being organized not only helps you in the application process, but also in the selection process once your application is submitted.  Business schools value a mature and organized applicant.  There's no better time to become one than as you start the process.
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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Who Makes the Admissions Decision?  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2018, 16:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Who Makes the Admissions Decision?
Getting a yes from a top b-school is a mysterious process.  It helps to know a little bit about the folks behind the scenes who are actually making the decision.Most b-school applicants spend so much time preparing for and executing their applications that they never stop to think about the people who will be reading them.  Sometimes we forget that at the end of the day, it's real humans behind the webpage where you upload your content and it's real humans who are doing the analysis.  This often gets lost in a sea of GMAT scores and statistics, where we try to calculate our odds of admission based on historical data.
An admissions committee is typically made up of many people outside of the full time admissions staff.Particularly at top schools, your first line of defense is often a reader, or someone they pay on a seasonal basis to sift through hundreds of essays looking for the ones that will resonate with their school's culture.  In many cases, these readers do not have MBAs themselves, so using complicated business jargon is usually a bad idea when writing essays and resumes.  Application readers are smart, everyday folks who have day jobs elsewhere and are looking for good communicators with something to contribute to the class.   
If you don't grab the reader in the first three minutes, you've already lost the war.  Remember, these folks are pouring through hundreds of applications, many of which are HUM-dreads of applications!  Don't fail before you even get a chance to make it to the big table!  Classic mistakes are typos, over-selling, repeating what's on your resume in the essays and failing to expose yourself in a personal, compelling way.  Readers are trained to pick up on these things quickly, so be creative...but not too creative.  It's harder to go overboard like you could before the days of paper and pen applications, where I've heard tell of applicants who laced their packages with glitter or perfume.  In the digital era, it's still possible to make critical mistakes, however, so you must be careful to walk the line between pumping your stock and popping the balloon.  
Once you pass the readers, you are usually placed in a pile for staff consideration.An admissions committee is typically comprised of the full time admissions staff as well as key students who have been invited to participate.  Students have the boots-on-the-ground perspective of what a good classmate looks like on paper, so fluffing up your experience rarely passes the sniff test of a current MBA candidate.  
If you make it past the table discussion, you are typically entered into the pile for interviews.  This is exactly where you want to be, that is, in a position to argue your case in person.  But it all starts with the adcom.  
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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Joined: 25 Jan 2010
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Changes in Platitudes  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2018, 16:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Changes in Platitudes
Standing out in the application process at business schools requires a conveyance of your unique position in the universe, so using commonplace phrases or truisms are a waste of precious word count. A platitude by definition is a remark or statement that has been used too often to be interesting or thoughtful.  Most times, a platitude has some sort of moral message, and you’d be shocked how many we find in MBA application essays.  Even though they are not technically platitudes, using colloquial phrases or glib sayings are just as bad. Before you pat yourself on the back for finishing your essay drafts, make sure you screen them for the kind of banality that will get an eye-roll from the admissions committees.  Hint:  the worst offender?  “Thinking outside the box.”
You can scour the internet and find list after list of troublesome clichés, you know, the ones that really don’t mean something personal to you, but are over used to the point of queasiness.  There’s also a line you can cross in MBA essays that make it too casual and not appropriate for a formal essay.  In an effort to appear “real” or honest, applicants can sometimes fail by going colloquial-loco.  Here is a list I recently came across to help guide you towards the path of originality and away from trite, unoriginal doom.
 There’s no “I” in Team
Good things come to those who wait
It was meant to be
The definition of insanity is doing the same thing and expecting different results
Such is life
Everything happens for a reason
People are our most important assetIt is what it is
What the mind can conceive, it can achieve
Winners never quit
What doesn’t kill me will only make me stronger
Teamwork makes the Dream work“C’est la vie”
Hard work always pays off
Great minds think alike
Money can’t buy happinessLive each moment like it’s your last
If at first you don’t succeed, try try again
Reinvent the wheel
It’s not rocket science
It’s all good
What goes up, comes down
What goes around comes aroundDon’t assume – it makes an ASS out of U and ME
Don’t be sad because it’s over, be glad that it happened
What’s done is done
Waste not want not
Go with the flowRome wasn’t built in a day
Work smarter, not harder
We’re all in this together
Time heals all wounds
We’ll all be laughing about this soon
It’s doesn’t matter if you win or lose, only that you tryTomorrow is another day
It could be worse
If life gives you lemons, make lemonade
The best things in life are free
It wasn’t meant to be
Better to have loved and lost…than to never have loved at all
Better late than never
At any rate…With all due respect…
Laugh and the world laughs with you
People mostly regret the things they didn’t do
You can’t judge a book by it’s cover
Work hard, play hardOnly the good die young
All’s fair in love and war
The more things change, the more they stay the same
It’s the darkest just before dawn
Perception is reality
You can be anything that you want to be
Patience is a virtue
The customer is always rightIf you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen
Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm
Be careful what you wish for
With great power comes great responsibility
If you avoid these and similar phrases ( I think you get the idea), your writing will feel fresh and original.  Now get out there, think outside the box, and write some damn good essays.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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Putting all your eggs in one basket  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2018, 19:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Putting all your eggs in one basket
Risk and reward are directly related.  While you would rarely ever risk it all on one opportunity, when it comes to applying to business school, great reward can sometimes be found by betting on one single school.The phenomenon of the early admit application was first invented by schools who had trouble attracting enough applicants.  In an effort to woo MBA candidates away from more competitive schools, lower-ranked schools promised easier admissions hurdles if one committed up front to attend.  This backfired in many cases, with many admitted applicants simply walking away from their offers when they obtained slots at more attractive schools.  The increased application numbers, however, got the attention of several schools in the top tier.
Before long, schools like Cornell, Columbia, Duke, Darden and others began experimenting with an early action round…But this time, they learned from the mistakes of the market.  Top schools started adding various caveats to their EA rounds, such as requiring students to withdraw applications from other schools if accepted.  They also required hefty cash deposits to be made, the combination of which helped reassure schools the seats they offered would indeed be locked in. In exchange for committing up front to one school, the early action b-schools offered preferential consideration and even in some cases, rather generous accommodation for what would be perceived as shortcomings in the regular rounds. 
The early action option is not a panacea.If you have a crappy GMAT score, bad grades, and unimpressive work experience, no amount of accommodation or bar-lowering will likely get you into a top school, but if you are lacking in one single area and feel your profile is rather impressive in other areas, then it could possibly pay off to put all your proverbial eggs in one basket.  But how do you decide?
Firstly, you must ask yourself how happy you would truly be if you “had” to go to your EA school. Next, ask yourself if you would still feel happy there knowing you also gained admission into your other schools.  If the answer is yes, then you are a good candidate for EA rounds.  If you waffled on your answer, you may want to reconsider.  At the end of the day, you will get what you need in your graduate education experience at any accredited b-school.  You should be analyzing the subtleties of what you desire from your school and make sure that beyond the core education, your chosen school is providing you what you seek.  If that school has an early action round, well...lucky you!
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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Applicant Strategy  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2018, 13:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Applicant Strategy
Now that applications have been released, it's time to get serious about your approach.  The moves you make now could impact not only your admissions decisions, but also your workload over the next few months.Hopefully you have already been working to prepare for application season.  You’ve had all summer to gather documentation, visit with former bosses and put some thoughtful cogitation into your story and how it will fit within various MBA programs.  School selection is one of the most important pieces of the puzzle; arguably the most important piece!  Even though choosing your target schools is critical,  you must also ruminate on the batting order of your application process.
Knowing not just where, but when you will apply can either streamline or radically disrupt your application approach.Firstly, there’s deadlines to consider.  Since there’s no standardization, of course every school has a different process and different timelines.  If you are targeting an early action program, you will clearly need to prioritize that school in your list.  This also means adjusting potential school visits and budgeting time for interviews down the road (hopefully).  Even schools who have regular first round deadlines, you have to come up with a plan of attack if you want to save headaches and stress when d-day (deadline day) comes.  Obviously, you can just arrange your workload to finish earlier deadline schools first, but this may be oversimplifying things.
Since it’s recommended that you let finished applications marinate before you submit them, you should come up with a plan to finish all of your applications early, giving you some margin on the backend to make adjustments.
One way you might consider approaching the order of operation is to “practice” on  your safety schools’ applications first.Often, MBA applicants use their second or third choice schools to flesh out their story and work the kinks out of the narrative, so to speak.  This approach pays off in several ways. Firstly, the pressure is off to get everything right up front.  If you were working on your top choice first, you would likely end up taking too much time to write essays and organize your thoughts, since you “have to get this one right.”  Utilizing a more casual approach on a couple of schools that you would happily drop if your real target offered you a seat will get you putting pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard), which is often a big hurdle.  Sounds simple, but writer’s block sets in early and often when you’re trying to sum up your life story and passion in just a few words.
Once you have a few core essays written for your alt-schools, you will likely begin to see holes and areas for improvement. Seeing how something looks on paper is a very effective way to ignite the creative juices to make it even better.  Of course, fleshing things out with a consultant or guide is a great way to hone your story in a way that makes it even more impressive or compelling.
Utilizing the process of shelving applications, or putting them aside without submitting them and working on the next school, allows for the story to marinate.  Working on schools one at a time helps you focus and stay true to each school's culture.  When doing this,  I have never seen a case where a client did not want to go back and make tweaks after working on subsequent packages.  Just like a painting or a film, the fine details and editing tweaks are often what make the difference between a masterpiece and a flop.  In any case, make sure you plan out the next several months on paper.  Get your deadlines locked in on your calendar and schedule time with yourself (actual appointments!) to sit down and work on specific tasks.  You’ll be glad you did so in the end.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact

Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

MBA Admissions Consultant
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Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1117
Time to Shine  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2018, 20:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Time to Shine
For decades, women and under-represented minorities were rarely found taking part in MBA programs.  Once the world figured out the value of a diverse marketplace and boardroom, however, the tables began to turn.  There is now no better time to apply if you fall in one of these categories.There was a time when a typical MBA classroom was 90% male and 85% Caucasian.  Today, it’s not uncommon for schools to enroll 40% or more of women and up to 30% or more of under-represented minorities. With a goal to get to 50% female, however, the competition amongst top schools vying for female candidates is fierce.  The result of this intensive recruiting has been a much more dynamic and insightful classroom and subsequently, a better business world.
The story is much the same for racially diverse candidates.African American applicants are in demand most of all because there are simply fewer applicants than there are seats for them at top schools--it’s classic supply and demand, which creates a near fervor, particularly over those applicants with an impressive profile.  For this reason, some of the best time and money you will spend as a diversity candidate will be on your GMAT prep.  If you are a URM applicant with a seven handle on your GMAT and good work experience, for example, you can pretty much write your own ticket.  Even if your GMAT score is lacking, the perspective you bring to the table in terms of diversity is so valuable to b-schools, that they will often accommodate here and there for profile shortcomings. 
Schools want their classrooms to be filled with voices from every walk of life, so the fewer voices like yours that are represented, the more unique your profile offering can be. Does this mean that unqualified applicants can get into b-school?—not at all.  A school may overlook a few points on the GMAT, but they still want to see a good score, or at least good grades in quant courses in college, which also demonstrates aptitude.  Work history is also critical for all applicants, whether you offer a diverse perspective or not, so no amount of cultural insight will make up for solid leadership and work experience.
In short, applying to business school requires the same rigorous list of accomplishments and skill that it always has, but if you also offer (in addition to that) a unique perspective which often comes naturally from being a woman or an under-represented minority, then you will have not only a shot at a better school, you will also have a shot at meaningful financial support in the way of scholarships and fellowships.  All I can say is, it’s about damn time.  Now get out there and take the advantage that has for too long been withheld.
To find out more about your options and how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or contact us via http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________


Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

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