GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 13 Dec 2019, 03:17

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Amerasia MBA Blog

  new topic post reply Update application status  
Author Message
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
References Upon Request  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Sep 2019, 07:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: References Upon Request
The only portion of your MBA application that is totally out of your control is the submission of recommendations.   There are a lot of moving parts in the MBA application process, which is actually one of the drivers of stress throughout application season. One area that can be particularly stressful is rounding up recommenders.
 Getting a handle on who will submit your recommendations early is critical. Time and time again, we have seen solid application packages tainted with a mad scramble for half-hearted recommendations at the buzzer.  The reason this is so harmful, is that the recommendations are actually pretty weighty with the adcoms.  Why?  It’s the only third-party objectivity they get when evaluating your profile.  Long before they decide to invite you in (or not) to an interview, they thoughtfully consider what your recos say about you.
 Providing thoughtful insight from recommenders takes time. You can’t ask someone at the last second to whip out a recommendation, no matter how well they know you.  Everyone is frightfully busy, so even your biggest fan will need some time to marinate in your story before filling out a recommendation.  Sure, they can rank you highly on the questions with a scale, but when asked to write out their comments in narrative form, they will find themselves either without the motivation or at least without the margin to go deep if time is tight. 
 Choose recommenders who are willing to spend a little time with you in advance.   Early in the process, you should target five or six people (or more!) whom you can take to lunch or get on a phone call to talk about your plans for b-school and your career vision.  Recommenders are also  good mentors or guides for you and can often provide insights into your performance and past that can inform how you approach the application itself.  Choose recommenders who know you well and have supervised you in the workplace.  Adcoms will discount any peer-related reviews or others who have interacted with you in ways that were not supervisory.  Can’t ask your boss for some reason?  Make sure you explain that to the committee in your application. 
Don’t be afraid to go back into your past for a good recommendation. Adcoms are not concerned much about having all your recommendations come from interactions in the past year or two.  It would be far better to get someone from five or ten years ago if they have deeper insights into who you are and can write anecdotally about your achievements and impact.  Don’t be timid about reminding your recommenders about what you felt you did well, but also don’t be surprised if they shed some new light on what you did well---people are often surprised at the insight they glean from discussing this whole process with a thoughtful recommender. 
 
For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Waiving Your Rights  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Sep 2019, 21:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Waiving Your Rights
Curiosity killed the cat, and it can kill your MBA aspirations too if you can’t resist the temptation to view your recommendations. Poor recommendations are the kiss of death for any MBA application, because schools know it’s the most objective information they will receive outside the personal interview. You can pump your own stock all day long, but if someone you trust and who knows you doesn’t sing your praises, it sends a very negative signal to the admissions committee that you may be more fluff than the right stuff. 
 You must go the extra mile with your recommenders to choose those who are truly in your corner and have a genuine interest in your success. Every MBA candidate endures the same gauntlet of applications before they claim a coveted seat in their target program.  On the way in, we all must gather recommendations from trusted supporters and former supervisors.  While it’s not always easy to choose good recommenders, it’s vital to a successful result.  To reduce the risk of a less than inspired or poorly written recommendation, it’s tempting to take a peek at them before you submit.
 Schools give you the option to read your applications: Don’t do it. The one thing that’s worse than submitting a bad recommendation, is to submit a recommendation that you have had the chance to review.  Remember that your recommender knows whether or not you have chosen to read the recommendation, and adcoms know what they say and how they rate you can be influenced by this decision.  Waiving your right to view the recommendation ensures the admissions committees that the writer had the freedom to be truly objective, without fear of backlash or losing face with you.  This means true objectivity remains intact.
 The best situation is having a supervisor who lavishes praises in your recommendation without your ever knowing the details. In order to achieve this, spend some thoughtful time choosing whom to invite into your MBA application process and then even more time casting your vision to them so they can do a deep dive into the details of why you are uniquely qualified to succeed as an MBA candidate.
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
The Roundup  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Sep 2019, 08:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: The Roundup
The application process for business school requires a little hunting and gathering, so don’t get caught having not done the legwork. Most of the stress around MBA application season comes from within your own mind as you are crafting your story in a compelling way and casting a solid vision which connects your achievements with your future plans.  Countless deleted drafts pile up in the waste bin while some applicants begin to question why they were even trying to leave a great job to go back to graduate school in the first place. 
 Gathering the necessary documentation required to submit a business school application can sneak up on you. One thing you can’t afford to forget is the often voluminous amount of support paperwork schools require before they will consider an application complete.  While the digital age has made things a little easier, how long ago it was that you were an undergrad student will affect how easy or difficult it is to pull records. 
 Many schools have everything you will need on their bursar’s website, so if your alma mater does:  be thankful. Applicants generally have a pretty easy time obtaining transcripts from a school where they spent four years and graduated.  Where it gets more complicated is digging up the transcript from that one course you took at the little community college while home for the summer.  It’s even more complicated still if that little community college no longer exists, or was absorbed into a larger regional or state school.  Graduate schools will need transcripts from every school you attended where the classes you took contributed to or were required by the degree you ultimately received. 
 Particularly public higher ed institutions have been fairly archaic over the years due to underfunding and other budgetary challenges.   If you attended a public university or a community college, particularly one whose status has changed over the years, you may want to get a jump on tracking down your records.  This way, you won’t be caught in a stressful, mad scramble later this fall when the deadline approaches.
  For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Full Disclosure  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Sep 2019, 14:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Full Disclosure
At some point, you must inform your employer about your intentions to go back to get your MBA. Full time business school is an all-in endeavor.  There will likely never be a time in your life when you are busier or more engaged.  While today is the age of side-hustles, there’s not a single top-tier business school that allows students to carry a job while in their program. 
 Working while going to full-time b-school is not only impossible, it’s not allowed. Matriculating at a top school typically requires you to attest that you are not otherwise employed.  It just doesn’t work.  Between classes, clubs, group work, company presentations and other activities, there’s simply not enough hours in the day to carry any kind of side work.  Needless to say, the decision to go back for your MBA will require you to notify your employer that you will be leaving your position.
 The tough question is:  when do I tell my boss I am resigning?  Often, MBA applicants are reluctant to tell their employers they will be leaving.  Why?  Mostly because they think will adversely affect their status at work if they aren’t accepted.  This presents a host of additional challenges.  For starters, waiting to tell them would generally prohibit you from using your boss as a recommender, which is risky.  Business schools value the recommendation of your current supervisor above any other because it’s the most current objective insight they can obtain in the selection process.  Still, depending on your relationship with your employer and the situation you are in at work, you may not want to notify them until you are already accepted.
 If you are in the category of full disclosure, be ready for some potential changes at work. No matter how good your standing is as an employee, once you announce your departure, you will slowly be treated differently.  Even in traditional b-school launch roles such as consulting or banking, the team will start looking to off-load their reliance on your contributions so they will be ready when you’re gone.  The best way to approach this is to do everything you can to support the transition.  Ask your boss and co-workers how you can help prepare for your departure.  Go out of your way to carry your weight in the final few months and take an active part in helping your replacement learn the responsibilities you will be leaving behind (if possible). 
 One more thing---think hard about reconsidering if you are one of those who is not disclosing to your boss until the last minute.  You might be surprised how supportive they will be and keeping it from them could potentially burn a bridge, which is not something you should do as you launch the next phase of your career.
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Merry-Go-Round  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Oct 2019, 20:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Merry-Go-Round
You should be intentional about your strategy regarding when to submit your MBA applications. While some b-schools utilize a rolling admissions process, most schools still stick with the traditional rounds structure.  If you are going round-and-round in your mind about when to submit, you really need to get organized and decide how to allocate your applications across the various rounds.
 Conventional wisdom dictates that the earlier you apply, the more likely you will be admitted.   This approach definitely pays off if you have a strong profile and take advantage of the early action rounds.  If you are new to the MBA application game, early action is a relatively new invention that schools came up with a few years ago to help combat melt and boost yield from their applicant pool.  In exchange for more favorable consideration, applicants agree to lock in with their chosen school if admitted.  Getting these commitments in early better helps schools manage their class size and ensures a core group of qualified students will be in place long before the mad scramble of the late rounds ever arrives.
 Still, some forget that the most competitive applications also come in during round one.   If you have some challenges in your application and you have missed or decided to skip on early action, you may consider also skipping round one, which often attracts the hard-charging, uber-organized type-A achievers to apply.  This early invitation to join the coveted ranks of accepted status can be tempting, since you generally find out before the holidays and can begin making plans, but don’t cave in to the alluring and reassuring comfort of certainty if you have concerns about the strength of your background or qualifications.
 Round two is usually a smaller pool, and often a bit less competitive than round one. Round two also obviously gives you more time to prepare your materials and write your essays.  You should always try to avoid feeling rushed in this important process of self-reflection and analysis, since doing so will only reflect poorly in your presentation.  Better to wait for a less crowded round and have put more thoughtful reflection into your story than to simply find out earlier. 
 Round three is generally considered the most difficult to navigate. Since most of the seats are filled by round three, it’s often more challenging to get a “yes” from the adcoms, who at that point are searching for specific types to fill holes or gaps in the student body makeup.  But instead of simply putting all  your applications in round two, a good strategy might be to allocate a few for each round, potentially saving some of your “safety” schools for the last round.  If you are lucky, you will have heard from one of your dream schools by then and can scrap the notion of having to do any third round applications at all.  Plus, you save a few bucks on application fees!
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Walking the tightrope  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Oct 2019, 20:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Walking the tightrope
 
Managing your time to achieve a winning MBA application while also achieving success in your full time job can be a real balancing act. Let’s face it:  once you have decided to return to b-school, you begin to lose a little interest in your job. 
 This is a reality we all face, yet one which warrants consideration.  While you may not care as much about how highly you achieve your goals at work anymore, you must remember that finishing well will make you not only feel better, but will also secure good recommendations when you may need them the most. 
 Leaving your employer well positioned for success will engender good, longstanding relationships which can come in handy when seeking references for internships in b-school.  Remember that you begin interviewing for internships very early into your first year, since schools try to line up their summer internship class even before the Christmas holidays in many cases.  Often the only references you can muster come from your last professional stop before starting your MBA program.
 Always leave a job better than you found it. This is an ethical approach to employment and will serve you well your whole career.  Want to really feel good about yourself?   Turn up the performance dial in your last few months.  Challenge yourself and set a high bar.  You are only going to thank yourself later when you see how hard you have to work post MBA.  The average work week for MBA holders is around 70 hours per week initially.  This is not for the feint of heart and while it may not be too far from what many applicants are already doing on the job before they start school, for others, it’s a whole new ball of wax. 
 Pushing yourself at work will give you the adrenaline and serotonin rush you will need to start business school with fervor and drive.  Trust me---you’ll need it. Still, you must carve out enough time to fashion a thorough and compelling application.  You can’t turn up the heat on yourself at work so high that you fail to put 100% effort into your applications too.  What seems to work well, however is this rush you get from achieving at work ends up coming across in your applications and especially in your interviews for b-school if you are lucky enough to get them.  Walking the tightrope between delivering a great application and delivering great results at work is not easy, but pays off in the end.
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Opportunity Cost  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Oct 2019, 13:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Opportunity Cost
Business school applications are down across the board thanks to the strong economy.  What is the real cost of stopping out to go back to business school?There’s lots of debate in the world today, but one thing that’s been difficult to argue is the thriving economy.  With expansion now in its 125th month, we’re continuing to enjoy what has literally been the longest running bull market in history.  While we’re statistically due for a correction, even another recession, the numbers are so good, that it would likely take a while to slow things down considerably. 
 When times are good, Newton’s first law takes over: objects in motion tend to stay in motion. The result?  MBA applicants have to decide whether or not it’s worth it to step off the economic train and forego two years of good income to hunker down in business school.  But opportunity cost isn’t just about foregone income.  With a historically low unemployment rate, workers are in short supply.  This means that promotions are ample.  Staying on the job often means access to higher level responsibilities and more rapid acceleration up the corporate ladder than you might experience in a slower economy.  Employers can’t afford to lose good employees and are willing to reward them to stay put.   
 In addition to Newton’s Law, there’s a more modern concept that also looms large: FOMO.   No matter how great an MBA can be for your career, voluntarily riding the sidelines while the rest of the world charges forward can be daunting.  Might you be better off to remain employed, get a promotion and a raise, then go back to business school later?  Before you decide to remain indefinitely gorging yourself at the good-times buffet, you need to remember one important thing:
 Right now, your odds of admissions success has never been better.   The better the economy, the easier it is to get into business school, plain and simple.  While you might be giving up a bonus, a promotion or a raise, the truth is, waiting to go back may be costing you far more than that.  Even if you can quantify exactly how much you are gaining by staying put, is it worth that same amount to not get into your dream school?  It’s nearly impossible to say whether or not you “would have gotten in” if you don’t try, so it may be a good idea to go ahead and at least put in some applications.  You can always try to defer an admission or even decline if you decide to keep on trucking.
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Digging Deep  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Oct 2019, 19:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Digging Deep
Toyota Motor Company invented a problem-solving approach called the Five Whys.  Read on to discover how can it help you with your MBA Essays… According to Wikipedia, Five whys is an iterative, interrogative technique used to explore the cause-and-effect relationships underlying a particular problem.  The technique was originally developed by Sakichi Toyoda and was used within the Toyota Motor Corporation during the evolution of its manufacturing process. The inventor of the Toyota Production System, Taiichi Ohno, described the five whys accordingly: By repeating why five times, the nature of the problem as well as its solution becomes clear. Sounds pretty simple, right?  But the tool has seen widespread use beyond Toyota, and is now used within Kaizen, lean manufacturing and Six Sigma.  You will surely learn about the five whys when you go to business school.
What do the five whys have to do with business school applications? It’s pretty straightforward, actually.  Business schools are looking to discover who you truly are, what makes you tick.  Often, an applicant will only begin to scratch the surface in this area by describing at a fairly superficial level their achievements and their desire to go to business school.  The five whys can help you peel back the layers to get to the root of your desires and thereby, allow you to demonstrate to business schools not only your true passions, but what drives them.
 Business schools often supply you with the first whys in the questions themselves: Why do you want to go to business school?  Why is now a good time to go back?  Why do you want to get your MBA here?  These questions, however simple they seem, will trick many applicants into diving right into their answer and subsequently miss the opportunity to go deeper.  The process is simple: answer the question in one sentence, then ask yourself “why” again.  Answer once again in one sentence, and then keep asking yourself why until you reach the 5th iteration.  Toyota claims that doing so will get to the root cause. 
 You will surprise yourself with how revealing the five whys can be. Let’s walk through an example:   Why do you want to go to business school?
             To make more money.Why do you want to make more money?
             Because I am not happy with the money I make now.Why aren’t you happy?          
             My job is not fulfilling.Why is your job not fulfilling?
             I don’t feel like I am reaching my full potential?Why aren’t you reaching your full potential?
             I am not able to apply my leadership strengths in the workplace. You can see how going deeper with the five whys can expose core drivers and reveal potential insights which can show the adcoms who you really are.  You don’t have to stop at number five either.  Keep going to unearth even more revolutionary truths you can package up in a narrative for the admissions committees. 
  For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
The Hail Mary  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Oct 2019, 19:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: The Hail Mary
Sometimes tossing out an application where you have very little chance of getting in can work in your favor. 
In football, the Hail Mary is a last resort, an all-or-nothing attempt to get a score.  The same approach in business school applications happens when you whip a low-probability attempt out to a school where you statistically expect to get rejected. 
 Why would you waste time applying to a school where you know you won’t get in? 
One reason is, you never know for sure until you try. No matter how unlikely it seems on the surface, until you actually apply, you can’t know.  For this reason alone, a Hail Mary can be a good way to put to bed any future questions that might arise in your mind.  It’s strangely comforting to settle something as life changing as where you go to grad school.  Getting in obviously settles the question much more dramatically, but not getting in also offers closure.  At the very least, that rejection permanently prevents you from wasting time wondering if you should have tried.
 
Another reason to throw up a Hail Mary MBA application: sometimes works out.  
Particularly during a roaring economy, your general odds of getting in anywhere is elevated, so what might be a low-chance application attempt in an average situation, could suddenly become possible. A growing economy sends far fewer people back to grad school than an average or poor economy, so particularly when things are going well, you might consider attempting several Hail Mary applications just in case one of your reach schools has some extra slots for someone with your profile.  Maybe they can’t fill it with someone similar to you but with a 750 GMAT score.  Or perhaps your slightly lower profile will slip through because others in your industry group are reluctant to leave their high-achieving careers.
 
Another advantage of the Hail Mary: You can sometimes affect your target schools’ decisions. 
Simply telling other schools that you are applying to a better school can psychologically affect the admissions decision in your favor.  B-schools are highly competitive for talent.  They need to fill all their seats and they get worried about not doing so.  Most schools will ask you where else you are applying and when you can answer with a school which seems threatening to them (and one you would likely choose over theirs), they often step up their game and get more serious about making you an offer. 
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
No "I" in Team  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Oct 2019, 16:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: No "I" in Team
Why is teamwork so important in business school? You have heard it your whole life: Teamwork makes the Dream work.  But teamwork takes on a whole new level of focus in business school applications.  Teamwork is so important, in fact, that if you don’t adequately convince the admissions committees that you excel in this area, you can forget a favorable decision on getting in.
Business school is extremely unique among graduate programs; for starters, you typically can’t roll straight in from undergrad. Business schools require several years of progressively responsible work experience for good reason.  Much of what you get out of school comes from what your classmates put in.  This obviously also means that what you contribute is of value to your classmates as well.  Top schools know that iron sharpens iron, so putting together a wide diversity of experienced professionals will enrich the experiential learning environment.
 Business school is often referred to as the Disneyland of graduate schools. Nobody fails out, there is no thesis required, and most importantly, you do almost everything in groups.  Working in groups is how the world works and is the primary reason why business schools are so successful at creating leaders who excel in the marketplace.  What business school lacks in individualized performance requirements, it makes up for in spades with intensity.  This is why b-schools won’t allow you to carry a job while you are in a full time MBA program.  Your full focus is required because your full attention is necessary to get everything done. 
 Cooperation in full time business school is like eating, breathing and sleeping. Admissions committees need to be convinced that you are not the kind of person who is just in it for themselves.  Sure, there are some big egos in business school and some high achieving, type-A personalities, but for the most part, applicants rarely slip through the admissions process who aren’t committed to working in teams to get things done.  Let’s be real, if you could get everything you needed done in the business world by yourself, you probably wouldn’t need business school at all, and would likely not ever have a very big business.  There’s only so much one person can achieve on their own. 
 What do admissions committees look for specifically when analyzing your profile for teamwork skills? For starters, they want to see on-the-job responsibilities that indicate your achievements were not obtained entirely on your own.  If your job duties find you predominantly in isolation (such as computer coding, or accountancy), you need to describe how others rely on what you do in order to hit the mark.  Speaking about common goals in the workplace and the part you play in achieving them can be an effective way to relate just how well you understand teamwork. 
 Asking your recommenders to comment anecdotally on how well you function in a team can also be a good way to show your target schools that you play well in the sandbox.  Third-party corroboration is very effective, and even though your recommenders are clearly biased and in your corner, their observations are the only part of the application that are not written by you directly.  So make sure you focus on demonstrating a strong teamwork ability in your applications.  You will probably get invited to interviews if you do.
  For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Personal Finance  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2019, 20:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Personal Finance
Getting your personal finances in order before you go to business school could be the single best move you can make besides getting accepted. Going back to business school is not an inexpensive endeavor.  Not only are you without any income for two years (after all, schools will not allow you to carry any kind of employment engagement as a full time MBA student), you are also paying through the nose for a top-notch business education.
 The typical MBA student is not very well-positioned for financial success.Most professionals in their early to mid-twenties are not all that worried about personal finance.  After spending four or six years as an undergrad eating Ramen noodles, they are now busy spending all that new, post-undergrad pay.  The temptation of a new car or nice apartment is difficult to pass up and thanks to creative financing, zero-percent interest and no-down-payment leasing options, everything from furniture to electronics become easy to obtain.
 The availability of easy credit is far and away the worst offender of personal finance woes. Credit card debt climbed steadily from the late 70’s all the way to the great recession in late 2008, but guess what?  It’s on the rise again, and has surpassed the total outstanding consumer debt level that we had achieved before the bubble burst.  If you know anything about the markets, this should be a huge cautionary sign.  After over 125 consecutive months of economic expansion (the largest in US history), it’s inevitable that some kind of correction is coming.
 The good news is, new MBA applicants have plenty of time to get their proverbial house in order. Start by paying off your credit card debt.  It’s likely you will take on debt in grad school, so bringing debt into the equation is just a bad idea.  Period.  Another thing you can do is to defer your current student loans.  Postponing payments on your existing loans can help you manage your finances better when your income shuts off.  Just remember that while student loan payments can be deferred, the interest still accrues.  When you graduate, however, you can possibly consolidate both student loans together for one easy payment.
 Saving money is old-fashioned.  And highly recommended. The best way to get your personal finances in order before business school is to simply save money.  Stop going to Starbucks and put the money in a jar.  Sell you car and buy a beater you can get around in for three years.  Move back in with your parents until you take off for grad school.  Do whatever you can to sock away cash.  You’ll need it.
The most important reason to get your finances in order?  The credit check. The first thing potential employers do in the hiring process is to do a credit check.  If you carry a poor financial situation into grad school, it’s only a flash before your next employer is inquiring into your balance sheet.  Not only are you interviewing within months of starting an MBA program for an internship, it’s often the same company who will be offering you a full time job, so there is very little time once you start school to make improvements.
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
First and Ten  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Oct 2019, 21:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: First and Ten
Going back to business school is a great chance to reset and start over. Business school is perhaps the most unique of all graduate school programs.  Not only can you apply and be accepted with virtually any background, you can pivot to a new career in almost any area that tickles your fancy post MBA. 
An MBA is not a magic wand, but a good MBA program can position yourself for success in almost any industry.Of course, employers will look to your pre-MBA experience just like your chosen business school program did to let you in, but the curriculum and academic rigor of a top MBA is essentially putting the stamp of approval on your skillset and leadership potential to come in and succeed from the very outset of your new career.
 There’s what you did before business school and what you do after. A clear delineation exists when you graduate from an MBA program.  Employers will forever more evaluate you not on what you did before b-school, but what you do after.  This means you must make wise choices after school as you move up (or on) in your career.  Every move must be intentional and build upon your former role if you want to make the most out of your MBA.  You also must be aggressive in your pursuits and work hard---companies will judge you by how quickly you move up the ladder after business school and if you stall out, you could hamper your advancement for the rest of your entire career. 
 Progressively responsible experience takes on a heightened importance after b-school. MBAs who do not move up and increase their responsibility and pay get left behind fairly quickly.  If you are not promoted within two to three years post MBA, you need to consider moving on to another company where your skills can be leveraged at a higher level.  Career progression is vital if you want to maximize the value of your degree.
 Changing careers is a commonly accepted practice after achieving your MBA. Don’t worry too much about doing a total reset on your career with business school.  Career switchers are one of the most common b-school graduates, so be prepared to simply explain how your past experience is transferable to your newly targeted role and how b-school has helped hone the natural leadership ability your target program identified within you when you applied in the first place.  You now have a new set of downs to work your way up the field.  Don’t squander it or you will have to punt!
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Unnecessary Roughness  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Nov 2019, 14:02
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Unnecessary Roughness
There’s no need to be competitive when you encounter fellow MBA applicants. Business school is by nature a place for competitors because business is competitive.  Great leaders usually have some sense of besting others whether it comes to quarterly earnings or annual sales.  Still, business school itself is a place to work together in perfect harmony---exchanging best practices while challenging each other to be your best. 
When you’re applying to b-school there’s a natural tendency to beat out your fellow applicants.With a limited number of seats and a large pool of b-school hopefuls, the application process can quickly feel like a game of musical chairs.  It’s all fun and games until the music stops and a mad scramble for a seat ensues.  After years of work to get to this point, you might be tempted to cast courtesy aside and do whatever it takes to get a bit of extra consideration in the selection process.
The most common places for the gloves to come off is during campus visits, class visits and interviews.  While the opportunity to make a good impression in person is extremely limited during the application process, you should avoid at all costs the urge to elbow out your fellow applicants while on campus.  School officials as well as students are always paying attention to their daily visitors and how you treat others is generally noted with great interest.  Of course being courteous to the staff and faculty is a given, but have you thought about how you are treating your fellow applicants?
Remember your fellow applicants are your potential classmates.  Just by being in the process together, you know you have something in common.  This is a good thing to keep in mind as you have opportunities to interact with your co-applicants.  Whether or not they will end up in the class with you, behaving as if you will be their cohort-mate will favorably impress everyone who is watching. 
So save your cut-throat competitive nature for the business world and be nice to your fellow applicants.  Schools will take notice and consider you mature, thoughtful and able to cooperate—all great qualities to demonstrate as you embark upon the b-school journey.
 
For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Presenting Yourself  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Nov 2019, 07:37
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Presenting Yourself
The MBA interview is your one and only chance to make a good impression.   Up until now, you have only presented yourself on paper to your target MBA programs, but now they are calling you in.  Whether for invitation-only interviews or scheduled interviews, it is unlikely you will find your way into a program without at least some kind of in-person consultation with the admissions crew.  You must be sure to make the best impression possible if you want to advance towards a decision in your favor.
 Showing up on campus means beginning with the basics: be on time, dress appropriately and be prepared. I am always shocked to hear about people showing up late to an MBA interview.  This is inexcusable and will definitely make a poor impression.  Being on time in business school is akin to being on time in business.  It’s expected.  If you’re not early, you’re late, so do whatever it takes to ensure you arrive on time.  If it means going a day early and doing a dry run, then so be it.  College campuses are notoriously difficult to navigate.  Buildings are not labeled well and parking is a nightmare by definition.  These are things even the average person knows, and being a candidate for their business school means you are above average.  Translation: you won’t make the kind of rookie mistake of being late. Period.
 Vestis Virum Facit--Clothes make the man (or the woman). What to wear is always up for debate, but the easy answer is, the school will tell you what to wear.  Always take schools at face value.  It’s not a trick to see if you will wear a suit if they say business casual.  If they don’t tell you, wear a suit.  If they say business casual, don’t wear a tie.  Looks like you’re trying too hard. But dressing well is always important, whether it be formal, casual or something in-between.  Make sure your clothes are pressed and clean of course, and try to wear something current, but not too fashionable.  You want to look nice without standing out, so don’t be garish our outlandish.  No cufflinks or tab collars.  Ladies should not wear fur or excessive jewelry.  Go easy on cologne or perfume.
 Like the Boy Scouts, Be Prepared. Preparing for the interview takes the most time---or at least it should.  Go over your application in detail to make sure you remember which version of your story you sent to the interviewing school.  Research the most common interview questions (we will be posting some of these to make it easy).  Don’t memorize answers, but have anecdotes and stories to illustrate key attributes (such as leadership, teamwork and when you’ve failed at something).  For some reason, business schools all want to hear you talk about failures.  Maybe it’s because failing is a sign of maturity and experience, both of which are valuable attributes for business school.  And make sure you come with a list of really good questions to ask them too.  Saying you “guess you’ve covered everything” when asked for questions will not make you look very thoughtful.  In the end, you will hopefully have presented yourself in person as well as you clearly must have on paper.  Otherwise, they wouldn’t be seeing you at all.
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Changing Your Mind  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Nov 2019, 07:37
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Changing Your Mind
The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry, but how will it affect your MBA journey? You worked hard to get the attention of your boss and the attention of a top MBA program.  Your story is compelling and your career vision inspiring. Now you’ve been accepted and have a year to prepare before you matriculate at your dream school. 
 What happens if you change your mind about what you want to do with your MBA degree? A year is a long time.  A lot can happen. While most people continue working, others use the time to do other things like travel, change jobs, or get a leg up in their chosen career transition.  No matter how you choose to use your year between acceptance and matriculation, however, you might be one who discovers that what you advertised to the admissions committee is no longer what you actually want to do. 
 The first thing you need to do is to relax.  While lots of folks will inquire about what you want to do with your MBA, nobody is going to ask you on your first day of business school what your career vision was in your application.  Secondly, you should also remember that plenty of your classmates will be in the same boat, so you won’t be the only one who ends up pursuing something different. 
 Ask yourself why? The real test of your inner sincerity is to get to the why.  If you begin to probe into why you are changing your mind, you will probably get closer to stabilization.  While business school is a great time to change careers, you must remember that b-school is not magic.  Employers will generally want to see some demonstrated success in your prior work history that dovetails well into your new field in addition to some solid academic performance in the MBA program before they will consider you for an internship.  Depending on the kind of work you are trying to do, you can’t expect to walk right into a new career just because you are getting your MBA ticket punched.
 The last thing to remember when changing your post MBA trajectory is that you may not stick to your new plan either. If you changed your mind once, you could indeed change it again.  After all, your b-school adventure is still quite a ways away.
 
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Bad News  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2019, 18:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Bad News
Notification Day is either extremely elating or devastatingly depressing. Here’s what you should do if the news is bad. It’s never easy to receive bad news, but when that bad news changes your whole outlook on life, it’s nothing to scoff at.  The first thing you should do if you receive the “thanks for applying” email instead of the “congratulations” email is to focus on the fact that your school choice is not going to change your life.  Getting an MBA is the headline and the specific school where you do it is just a detail.  There are dozens of schools where you can get exactly what you need to achieve your dreams, so never think fatalistically about getting in or not. 
 Plan B is more important than plan A. Why would having a backup plan be more important than your primary goal?  Because getting your primary goal doesn’t send you into a mental tailspin.  Failing to hit your plan A can cause severe problems for you if you are not prepared.  Having a thoughtful and achievable plan B is like having insurance on your future.  People who fail to craft an alternative to their primary objective risk getting distracted, getting depressed, or worst of all, giving up.  If you are truly MBA material, you won’t settle for failure.  You will rise up and move forward.
 Should you settle or should you try again? The big question when not getting accepted is whether you should move on to your backup schools or wait and reapply to your target school again.  Reapplying has it’s advantages, such as getting an extra measure of consideration the second time, getting an extra year of experience, and having some time to improve other core profile attributes.  Of course the bid disadvantage is that you have to wait another year.  Wrestling with this decision is one of the most important ones you will make and it ties directly into having a plan B in the first place.  This is not a decision you want to put off until you get rejected, but rather something you should think about up front.  Try to imagine what you will really feel like if you get a “no” from your dream school.  Knowing this in advance can help you make the right call.
 Get feedback from your target school. Not every school’s admissions committee will give you feedback on your application and why you were rejected, but it doesn’t hurt to try.  Going in person is one of the most effective ways to get a response, but if this is impractical for logistical reasons, try calling them.  Email is the default for most people, but is also the lease effective way to get any information. If you are lucky enough to get feedback, use it to tweak your subsequent applications so you can correct your course for round two or three.
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Timing the Market  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Nov 2019, 21:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Timing the Market
Timing as they say, is everything, but is this true for when you choose to submit your MBA applications? You’ll hear plenty of theories when you begin to research the MBA application process.  Some of the most debated topics encompass when you should submit your application.  Most commonly, applicants worry about which round they should submit their application, but a more subtle discussion surrounds when you should submit within each round. 
 Submitting your application early is considered by some to give you an advantage.  This can sometimes work in your favor, but only for schools who have a rolling admissions structure.  When schools consider applications on a rolling basis, they begin filling seats from the very first qualified applicant who gets everything turned in.  Does this mean you should rush through your application to take advantage of the rolling decision?  Absolutely not, because rushing though typically means you are also sacrificing quality.  You should only submit early if you and your consultant truly feel your application is ready.  Not one minute before.  Another myth:
 Submitting at the deadline hurts your odds of admission. No matter whether your target school has a rolling admissions deadline or a “regular round” submission process, submitting at the last minute will generally not hurt your odds.  A highly qualified applicant can get a seat in their target program no matter when you submit and unless your school has the rolling admissions process, they will usually consider all applications at once, after each round’s deadline passes.  In short, the admissions committee for a regular round school doesn’t even know when you submitted---it’s literally not a consideration for them at all. The final myth:
 Submitting in the middle of a round will get you lost in the shuffle. This is another mis-truth which was likely born from urban legend.  Submitting in the middle of the round has absolutely no impact on how they consider your qualifications.  So when should you submit?  There are two schools of thought.  One says you should submit whenever your application is ready.  The other says you should submit close to the deadline, to give you every chance to make improvements.  No matter which choice you make, however, you should only submit when you feel you have put your best foot forward.  It’s as simple as that.
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
Thanks And Giving  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Nov 2019, 10:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: Thanks And Giving
Today is the perfect day to think about what you’re thankful for.  It’s also a great time of year to think about thanks and giving when preparing  your MBA applications.It should go without saying, but it continues to surprise me each year how many applicants to b-school fail to properly thank people throughout the application process.  A thank you goes a long way and what’s more, it’s expected.  A simple thank you can be what separates someone from being admitted from someone being told no.
 Giving thanks to those you encounter in the application process starts early. From your very first encounter at school information sessions, to class visits (yes thank your student hosts as well as those who set up the visit for you), sending a thank you note or email should be sent promptly after your encounter.  Hand-written or electronic, a thank you of any variety will check the box and ensure you are courteous, professional and thoughtful.  These are qualities that all business leaders should demonstrate, so don’t make the mistake of missing your own opportunity to show them you are “MBA material.”
 It’s not just the people who work for your target school whom you need to thank. Remember that there is an army of people helping you get into business school, from your recommenders to your essay readers, to those with whom you conduct informational interviews.  Getting into the thank-you habit will help you establish a routine that will positively impact the rest of your career.  If you are not already on the thank-you train, now is the perfect time to practice.
 Giving is also a great habit to build. Most schools are going to ask you when you interview how you support your undergrad alma-mater.  It’s always great to say without hesitation that you give them money.  While not any more important than engaging with your time, giving money to your alma mater is a very practical way to demonstrate your generosity and support which incidentally, is also a standard trait of all business leaders.  Giving back is a requisite quality of any high-performing professional, so make sure you take this simple step to show that you know how to walk and talk like a true business leader.
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
The Holiday Crush  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2019, 23:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: The Holiday Crush
Don’t Let the Holidays crush your MBA dreams. Just about the time MBA application season gets into full swing, the holidays come barreling down the track like a runaway train.
 While it’s not apparent why schools would set their 2nd round deadlines just after the holiday season, it’s clear that whomever decided the schedule was clearly a masochist.  Turning in your applications during the first week or two of the new year pretty much mandates that you donate much of your holiday time to their preparation, not to mention the time of others who are helping you with the process such as recommenders and consultants.
 Finding time during the holidays to get things done is always challenging. Now you’re adding applying to b-school to the mix and suddenly the usual holiday crush becomes downright overwhelming.  One of the best things you can do to retain your sanity, is to compartmentalize your to-do list.  Start by planning specific chunks of time on your calendar to work on your applications as well as specific times to do your gift shopping and decorating, etc.  When you treat everything you must do as a scheduled event, you can manage your calendar and your time in a way that will help you get everything done.
 Touch base with your recommenders ahead of the holiday break. Communicating to your helpers in advance will ensure there are no surprises when the deadlines start creeping in.  This also goes for your consultant, who, like you, will also be trying to save time for personal holiday traditions.  Even if you are working with an hourly consultant, don’t assume they will drop everything to meet your deadline.  Recommenders can be even more unruly, since you can’t pull the “I’m paying you card” when time gets tight.  Since recommendations are the only part of the application process that is out of your control, it’s important that you communicate to your recommenders well in advance of the deadlines so you don’t end up with an incomplete application when the deadline arrives.
 Budget time for relaxing too. Don’t underestimate how stressful the holidays can be when you add an application deadline or two into the mix.  You must take time to care for your mental health.  Just like your to-do’s, you can also schedule time to rest and relax.  You’ll be glad you did.
For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton
MBA Admissions Consultant
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jan 2010
Posts: 1016
The Super Day  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Dec 2019, 21:01
FROM Amerasia MBA Blog: The Super Day
A Super Day at your target school is quite possibly the best chance you have for getting in.When you get invited to come to an all-day visit at your dream school, you should feel pretty good about yourself.  For schools with invitation-only interview days, your chances for getting in rise 50% when you asked to come in.  But before you get too cocky, there are a few things to think about.
The whole day is an interview. This is probably the best advice you can get for a Super Day visit.  From the moment you check in, to the tour, to the class visit, to the traditional, sit-down interview, literally every encounter you have while you are there is being evaluated.  Make sure you treat everyone like they are the Dean of Admissions.  This includes your fellow applicants.  Even the students will be asked to fill out an evaluation on their interaction with you, so at the risk of freaking you out, make sure you are intentional about all your interactions as you make your way around the busy schedule.
The class visit is not a chance for you to show off your knowledge and skillset. Many visitors make the blunder of over-sharing in the class visit.  Or sharing at all.  The class visit should be a case of “don’t speak unless spoken to.”  It’s your chance to observe, be respectful, and evaluate, not your chance to demonstrate how much you know about the subject matter.  Certainly if the professor invites you specifically to chime in, then by all means have something to say, but if a general question is asked to the class, don’t raise your hand or volunteer an answer.  They are not looking to see how you might participate as a student, they are merely looking for you to soak it in and observe.
 Lunch has ruined many a well-intended applicant. Usually, a Super Day will include lunch with some students or a professor, or both.  This is where you should put on your best table manners and remember one important thing: it’s not about food today.  Don’t linger over a menu, don’t load up your plate at the buffet.  Get something easy to eat fairly quickly with a fork---if you are not satisfied, know that you can grab a burger on the way back to the airport.  Don’t talk with your mouth full and don’t interrupt others. 
 Always ask for business cards.This should be a no-brainer, but many visitors don’t realize that the students have business cards too, not just the professors and staff.   When you exchange cards, try to jot a note or two on the back when you have a break to help you write personal thank you emails or notes later.  This is a great way to follow up with your Super Day hosts.
 For information on how we can guide your business school application process, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or go to http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact
Permalink
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Paul Lanzillotti | Founder| About | mba@amerasiaconsulting.com | 877.866.9251

Schedule a Consultation | Twitter | Blog

Download "How To Apply" Guides | INSEAD | Columbia | Harvard | Wharton

Go to page   Previous    1  ...  7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18    Next  [ 341 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Amerasia MBA Blog

  new topic post reply Update application status  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne