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Another long one. Originally developed for detecting air

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Manager
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Another long one. Originally developed for detecting air [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2008, 09:47
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A
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D
E

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Question Stats:

100% (01:08) correct 0% (00:00) wrong based on 3 sessions

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Another long one.

Originally developed for detecting air pollutants, a technique called proton-induced x-ray emission, which can quickly analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it, is finding uses in medicine, archaeology, and criminology.

(A) Originally developed for detecting air pollutants, a technique called proton-induced x-ray emission, which can quickly analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it,
(B) Originally developed for detecting air pollutants, having the ability to analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it, a technique called proton induced x-ray emission
(C) A technique originally developed for detecting air pollutants, called proton-induced x-ray emission, which can quickly analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it,
(D) A technique originally developed for detecting air pollutants, called proton-induced x-ray emission, which has the ability to analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance quickly and without destroying it,
(E) A technique that was originally developed for detecting air pollutants and has the ability to analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance quickly and without destroying the substance, called proton-induced x-ray emission,

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Re: SC - A Technique [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2008, 08:32
Richardson wrote:
Another long one.

Originally developed for detecting air pollutants, a technique called proton-induced x-ray emission, which can quickly analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it, is finding uses in medicine, archaeology, and criminology.

(A) Originally developed for detecting air pollutants, a technique called proton-induced x-ray emission, which can quickly analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it,
(B) Originally developed for detecting air pollutants, having the ability to analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it, a technique called proton induced x-ray emission
(C) A technique originally developed for detecting air pollutants, called proton-induced x-ray emission, which can quickly analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it,
(D) A technique originally developed for detecting air pollutants, called proton-induced x-ray emission, which has the ability to analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance quickly and without destroying it,
(E) A technique that was originally developed for detecting air pollutants and has the ability to analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance quickly and without destroying the substance, called proton-induced x-ray emission,


I feel that this a very tough Q. It tests a concept of the modifier which, which is not common

The only difference is the placing of the noun technique in A & C. In A which can refer to not just the word emission but the whole :a technique called proton induced x-ray emission". In C, the word technique is moved out and which now refers to emission making the sentence meaningless

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Re: SC - A Technique [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2008, 22:03
icandy wrote:
Richardson wrote:
Another long one.

Originally developed for detecting air pollutants, a technique called proton-induced x-ray emission, which can quickly analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it, is finding uses in medicine, archaeology, and criminology.

(A) Originally developed for detecting air pollutants, a technique called proton-induced x-ray emission, which can quickly analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it,
(B) Originally developed for detecting air pollutants, having the ability to analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it, a technique called proton induced x-ray emission
(C) A technique originally developed for detecting air pollutants, called proton-induced x-ray emission, which can quickly analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it,
(D) A technique originally developed for detecting air pollutants, called proton-induced x-ray emission, which has the ability to analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance quickly and without destroying it,
(E) A technique that was originally developed for detecting air pollutants and has the ability to analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance quickly and without destroying the substance, called proton-induced x-ray emission,


I feel that this a very tough Q. It tests a concept of the modifier which, which is not common

The only difference is the placing of the noun technique in A & C. In A which can refer to not just the word emission but the whole :a technique called proton induced x-ray emission". In C, the word technique is moved out and which now refers to emission making the sentence meaningless



Agree with A.

All other options have modifier issues.

[Subject] is finding uses in medicine, archaeology, and criminology.

Subject is clearely "A technique" in option A..
In other options [subject] is not clear.
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Manager
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Re: SC - A Technique [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2008, 22:59
Lets break it down :

Originally developed for detecting air pollutants (participle modifying the subject)
a technique (subject)
called proton-induced x-ray emission, (Participle modifies the subject)

which can quickly analyze the chemical elements in almost any substance without destroying it, ( Adjective clause introduced by relative pronoun "which")

is finding (verb)
uses in medicine, archaeology, and criminology (object)

(A)
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Re: SC - A Technique   [#permalink] 26 Sep 2008, 22:59
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Another long one. Originally developed for detecting air

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