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Re: Educator: Despite claims that books offer a better reading experience [#permalink]

Official Explanation


Premise #1 – Study’s findings: people can recall facts better when learning off an e-reader

Conclusion: E-readers are better for deep understanding.

Assumption: That recalling facts equates to a deep understanding. This matches best with (B).

(A) compares leisure reading to the reading done in the study. “Deeper understanding of material” does not match up with leisure reading.

(B) The answer.

(C) weakens the premise not the conclusion.

(D) is the view of those who disagree with the conclusion. Their reasoning, however, does not relate to the findings of the study.

(E) does not relate to the question of how well one understands material and the reading medium one uses.
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Re: Educator: Despite claims that books offer a better reading experience [#permalink]
mikemcgarry wrote:
Harley1980 wrote:
Educator: Despite claims that books offer a better reading experience than electronic readers, a recent study found 90% of subjects demonstrated an increased ability to recall facts when that material was presented on an electronic reader rather than on the printed page. Therefore, if the reader hopes to have a deeper understanding of the material he or she is reading, that person should study using an electronic reader.

Which of the following calls into question the conclusion of the educator?

A) The ability to recall information while taking part in a study is similar to the ability to recall information when one reads for leisure.
B) Reading comprehension depends on how well one is able to connect facts not on how well one is able to recall facts in isolation.
C) Electronic readers may be filled with hyperlinks, which can be highly distracting.
D) Those who claim that reading on actual paper improves retention rate cite the importance of where on the page text is located.
E) Amongst adults, electronic readers are quickly displacing books as the preferred medium for reading.

Dear Harley1980,
I'm happy to respond. :-) This is another one that my friend Chris Lele wrote.

Think about this. The big evidence the "educator" cites is: folks who read on the electronic reader have "an increased ability to recall facts." Then, the big conclusion is that reading on the electronic reader will result in "deeper understanding." Whoa! Are "recall of facts" and "deeper understanding" the same thing?

A very effective way to weaken an argument is to torpedo the argument's assumption. This argument was conflating "recall of facts" with "deeper understanding," and choice (B) absolutely obliterates that facile equation---and in doing so, calls the coherence of the argument into question. This is the most effective weakener.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


KarishmaB, I am finding real difficult to not select C as the Answer.
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Re: Educator: Despite claims that books offer a better reading experience [#permalink]
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samagra21 wrote:
mikemcgarry wrote:
Harley1980 wrote:
Educator: Despite claims that books offer a better reading experience than electronic readers, a recent study found 90% of subjects demonstrated an increased ability to recall facts when that material was presented on an electronic reader rather than on the printed page. Therefore, if the reader hopes to have a deeper understanding of the material he or she is reading, that person should study using an electronic reader.

Which of the following calls into question the conclusion of the educator?

A) The ability to recall information while taking part in a study is similar to the ability to recall information when one reads for leisure.
B) Reading comprehension depends on how well one is able to connect facts not on how well one is able to recall facts in isolation.
C) Electronic readers may be filled with hyperlinks, which can be highly distracting.
D) Those who claim that reading on actual paper improves retention rate cite the importance of where on the page text is located.
E) Amongst adults, electronic readers are quickly displacing books as the preferred medium for reading.

Dear Harley1980,
I'm happy to respond. :-) This is another one that my friend Chris Lele wrote.

Think about this. The big evidence the "educator" cites is: folks who read on the electronic reader have "an increased ability to recall facts." Then, the big conclusion is that reading on the electronic reader will result in "deeper understanding." Whoa! Are "recall of facts" and "deeper understanding" the same thing?

A very effective way to weaken an argument is to torpedo the argument's assumption. This argument was conflating "recall of facts" with "deeper understanding," and choice (B) absolutely obliterates that facile equation---and in doing so, calls the coherence of the argument into question. This is the most effective weakener.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


KarishmaB, I am finding real difficult to not select C as the Answer.



Option (C) is out of scope.

Conclusion: Therefore, if the reader hopes to have a deeper understanding of the material he or she is reading, that person should study using an electronic reader.

The point is - when one reads a book vs when one reads digitally, does reading digitally lead to deeper understanding?

C) Electronic readers may be filled with hyperlinks, which can be highly distracting.
It is certainly a con of reading digitally but its not what we are discussing. One could get distracted now and then but still understand the material better while reading digitally. The point is - does one understand better?

Think in another way - If the argument is "whether digital media leads to better retention," saying that "digital media wastes too much time" doesn't help. I am not interested in the other advantages or disadvantages of either media.

B) Reading comprehension depends on how well one is able to connect facts not on how well one is able to recall facts in isolation.
Tells us that the conclusion is unjustified because we have been told that digital media leads to better retention of facts. It doesn't imply deeper understanding. Then how can we conclude about deeper understanding?
This makes sense. It attacks our conclusion.

Answer (B)
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Re: Educator: Despite claims that books offer a better reading experience [#permalink]
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