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Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chip

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Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chip  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2019, 12:06
Quote:
(A) Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chipped onto their faces, have been found all over North America, they are named for the New Mexico site where they were first discovered in 1932.

LoneSurvivor wrote:
I have a quick question experts how can They in option A unambiguously refers to " Clovis Points " instead of "Sspear Ppoints"

LoneSurvivor , you may have missed daagh 's answer to this question earlier in the thread. You can find his answer HERE..

If you did see the post but would like an additional approach, we can look to (1) the content of the "they" clause, and (2) the logic of the sentence. No matter how this issue is approached, we can always substitute the noun for the pronoun; if "spear heads" makes no sense when substituted into the "they" clause, then "spear heads" cannot be the antecedent.

• "they are named" - the antecedent must have, be, or refer to a proper name
-- they unambiguously refers to Clovis points because they have a special (and counterintuitive) name. The antecedent for they is "named." The only noun with a proper name is Clovis points.

In English, only proper nouns are capitalized.
-- Clovis points is a name. (In English, names in biology frequently have only the first word capitalized.)
-- spear points is not a name.
(I removed your initial caps from "Spear Points.")

The pronoun they refers to something that is named, and that something can only be Clovis points because spear points is not a name.

• Sentence meaning and logic make Clovis points the only logical antecedent
Alternatively, the meaning and logic of the sentence make "Clovis points" the only logical antecedent. From the appositive we know that Clovis points are a specific kind of spear point.

The sentence explains why things found all over a whole continent are specifically called "Clovis points." The clause "they are named . . ." describes why "Clovis" is the name (they were first discovered in Clovis, New Mexico)—not why generic spear heads are called spear heads.

• substitute both antecedents for they: only Clovis points makes sense
When in doubt, replace the pronoun with the noun.

Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chipped onto their faces, have been found all over North America, Clovis points are named for the New Mexico site where they were first discovered in 1932. :)

Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chipped onto their faces, have been found all over North America, spear points are named for the New Mexico site where they were first discovered in 1932. :x
-- That sentence makes no sense.

Hope that analysis helps.
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Re: Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chip  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2019, 14:28
LoneSurvivor wrote:
I have a quick question experts how can They in option A unambiguously refers to " Clovis Points " instead of "Spear Points"


Hello LoneSurvivor!

Thank you for your question! I know that pronouns and antecedents can be tricky, especially in long-winded sentences such as this one! Let's take a look at option A and answer your question:

(A) Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chipped onto their faces, have been found all over North America, they are named for the New Mexico site where they were first discovered in 1932.

The reason we can confidently say the pronoun "they" refers to Clovis points and not spear points is because the phrase with spear points is a MODIFIER. Pronouns don't typically refer back to modifiers - they refer back to subjects. If we take out the modifier, we're left with this:

(A) Even though Clovis points have been found all over North America, they are named for the New Mexico site where they were first discovered in 1932.

Whenever you're checking for pronoun-antecedent agreement, a good way to check that they're clear and correct is to get rid of all the extra "junk" in a sentence that is merely there to add more information (and to confuse GMAT students)! This "junk" can be things like modifiers, prepositional phrases, interjections, etc.

I hope this helps!
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Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chip  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2019, 11:33
Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chipped onto their faces, have been found all over North America, they are named for the New Mexico site where they were first discovered in 1932.


(A) Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chipped onto their faces, have been found all over North America, they are named for the New Mexico site where they were first discovered in 1932.

(B) Although named for the New Mexico site where first discovered in 1932, Clovis points are spear points of longitudinal grooves chipped onto their faces and have been found all over North America.

(C) Named for the New Mexico site where they have been first discovered in 1932, Clovis points, spear points of longitudinal grooves chipped onto the faces, have been found all over North America.

(D) Spear points with longitudinal grooves that are chipped onto the faces, Clovis points, even though named for the New Mexico site where first discovered in 1932, but were found all over North America.

(E) While Clovis points are spear points whose faces have longitudinal grooves chipped into them, they have been found all over North America, and named for the New Mexico site where they have been first discovered in 1932.

Dear experts
egmat AjiteshArun generis

Can we eliminate choice B on the basis of no subject - verb for 1st IC?

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Re: Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chip  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2019, 12:25
sonusaini1 wrote:
Dear experts
egmat AjiteshArun generis

Can we eliminate choice B on the basis of no subject - verb for 1st IC?

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Hi sonusaini1,

This is option B:
Although named for the New Mexico site where first discovered in 1932, Clovis points are spear points of longitudinal grooves chipped onto their faces and have been found all over North America.

Here we have a dependent clause joined to an independent clause using although. This is a pattern that you'll see very often: although (DC), IC. When the although is at the starting of the sentence, we can "understand away" the subject and verb in some cases in the dependent clause.

Although he was unfit, he played the match.
Although he was unfit, he played the match.
Although unfit, he played the match.

We can't do this if the subject is something else entirely:
Although unfit, the match was played by him. ← This is not correct, as it implies that the match was unfit.

What you pointed out works for another dependent clause (the one introduced by where):
... the New Mexico site where first discovered in 1932...

Here we need both the subject and verb.
... the New Mexico site where they were first discovered in 1932...
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Re: Even though Clovis points, spear points with longitudinal grooves chip   [#permalink] 19 May 2019, 12:25

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