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From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating

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From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 02 Sep 2017, 11:43
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62% (01:58) correct 38% (01:46) wrong based on 151 sessions

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From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating per year at a group of five associated universities increased by 40 percent. During the same period, the number of students graduating from these universities with honors degrees grew by only 20 percent.

Which of the following statements about the period from 1950 to 1975 in these five universities is best supported by the statements above?

(A) The criteria for selecting honors students became more rigorous.
(B) The faculty-to-student ratio declined, allowing less time for advisors to encourage students to pursue honors degrees.
(C) The increase in enrollment resulted from lower admissions standards.
(D) Students at the end of the period were more career-oriented than those at the beginning.
(E) The number of students graduating without honors increased by more than 40 percent.

Can anyone give a thorough explanation on the correct answer? Thank you! :)

Originally posted by jcar7117 on 02 Sep 2017, 09:21.
Last edited by broall on 02 Sep 2017, 11:43, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2017, 09:22
Help with thorough explanation please:

An athlete, in order to excel in a sport, must have a natural ability for that sport or spend a great deal of time practicing. Thus if you are a college student and your first priority is getting good grades, you should not do a sport unless you have a natural ability for that sport.

The argument above assumes all of the following EXCEPT:

(A) College students should not do sports unless they want to excel in their sport.
(B) Time spent practicing a sport limits a college student’s ability to get good grades.
(C) A college student cannot succeed in sports and get good grades.
(D) Only college students who have a natural ability for a sport can get good grades and do well in their sport.
(E) College students who spend a lot of time practicing a sport will not get good grades.
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Re: From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2017, 11:46
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jcar7117 wrote:
From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating per year at a group of five associated universities increased by 40 percent. During the same period, the number of students graduating from these universities with honors degrees grew by only 20 percent.

Which of the following statements about the period from 1950 to 1975 in these five universities is best supported by the statements above?


There are 2 sets.

Set A includes students graduating from these universities
Set B includes students graduating from these universities with honors degrees

Since set B is a sub-set of set A, there is another set C that includes students graduating from these universities without honors degrees.

We have A = B + C.

A increased by 40%, but B increased by only 20%. Hence C must increase more than 40% to balance two sides. Answer E.
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Re: From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2017, 10:05
Premise 1: From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating per year at a group of five associated universities increased by 40 percent.

Premise 2: During the same period, the number of students graduating from these universities with honors degrees grew by only 20 percent.

Conclusion: None

Option A is the possible explanation for first premise, but it doesn't have to be true.; the criteria could have stayed the same (or become even less rigorous) while the students got worse.

Option B is again a possible explanation of the Premise 1, but it doesn't have to be true.

Option C is a possible explanation of the Premise 2, but it doesn't have to be true; the increase in enrolment (assuming enrolment - and not just the number of students graduating increased) could be due to the increase in the number of applications.

Option D is out of scope; we cannot establish a relation between honours degree (or no honours degree) with career orientation

So, we are left with E, E has to be it!

Pretty straightforward: Students graduating increased by 40%, but students graduating with honours increased by only 20%. Hence student without honours must increase more than 40% to balance two sides. Answer E.

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Re: From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2017, 10:42
E

Assume there are 100 students initially out of which 10 graduated with Honours.

No. of students increased by 40% i.e 40% of 100 = 140.
While No of students graduating with Honours increased by 20% i.e 20% of 10 = 12

Given the above two statements, No of students graduating without honours increased from 90 to 128 which is 42.2% (greater than 40)
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Re: From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2017, 11:00
What is the source of this question? I got answer E through POE but I don't understand why E is necessarily true.

Lets say Original number is 100 and increased by 40% gives us 140 students graduating.
x students graduate with honors and 20% increase is x times 1.2

here, x can be any number less than or equal to hundred. So why is it true that the number of students graduating without honors increased by more than 40 percent.

So confused :(
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Re: From 1950 to 1975, the average number of students graduating &nbs [#permalink] 05 Oct 2017, 11:00
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