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Historian: Radio drama requires its listeners to think about what they

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Historian: Radio drama requires its listeners to think about what they  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2018, 23:17
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Difficulty:

  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

48% (01:19) correct 52% (01:23) wrong based on 281 sessions

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Historian: Radio drama requires its listeners to think about what they hear, picturing for themselves such dramatic elements as characters’ physical appearances and spatial relationships. Hence, while earlier generations, for whom radio drama was the dominant form of popular entertainment, regularly exercised their imaginations, today’s generation of television viewers do so less frequently.

Which one of the following is an assumption required by the historian’s argument?

(A) People spend as much time watching television today as people spent listening to radio in radio’s heyday.

(B) The more familiar a form of popular entertainment becomes, the less likely its consumers are to exercise their imaginations.

(C) Because it inhibits the development of creativity, television is a particularly undesirable form of popular entertainment.

(D) For today’s generation of television viewers, nothing fills the gap left by radio as a medium for exercising the imagination.

(E) Television drama does not require its viewers to think about what they see.

Source: LSAT 60
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Re: Historian: Radio drama requires its listeners to think about what they  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Mar 2018, 21:06
I would go with option D as it clearly states the assumption as to why the author thinks that today's generation use less of their imagination.



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New post 10 Mar 2018, 08:00
Is E wrong because of the 'drama' bit after Television? In the argument we are concerned with tv viewers, but the AC narrows it to TV drama viewers?
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Historian: Radio drama requires its listeners to think about what they  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 10 Mar 2018, 12:47
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stickman wrote:
Is E wrong because of the 'drama' bit after Television? In the argument we are concerned with tv viewers, but the AC narrows it to TV drama viewers?


I was also stuck between D and E, and then realized that probably the key here is 'imagination' and not just mere 'thinking'. Because D plugs in the gap about the lack of imagination, whereas E is just making a generalised statement, requiring us to make the additional assumption that 'thinking' about something must be a part of 'imagination', I went for D.

Originally posted by carolinexi on 10 Mar 2018, 12:34.
Last edited by carolinexi on 10 Mar 2018, 12:47, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Historian: Radio drama requires its listeners to think about what they  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2018, 12:39
carolinexi wrote:
stickman wrote:
Is E wrong because of the 'drama' bit after Television? In the argument we are concerned with tv viewers, but the AC narrows it to TV drama viewers?


I was also stuck between D and E, and then realized that probably the key here is 'imagination' and not just mere 'thinking'. Because D plugs in the gap about the lack of imagination, whereas D is just making a generalised statement, requiring us to make the additional assumption that 'thinking' about something must be a part of 'imagination', I went for D.


Ah yes - okay that is a much stronger case for why E is wrong than what I had thought.
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Re: Historian: Radio drama requires its listeners to think about what they  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2018, 09:27
Between E and D: E contradicts the information in the para. The para says "today’s generation of television viewers exercise their imagination less frequently". Nowhere it says that the tv viewers don't exercise the imagination at all. Also, the language of E makes a bit of broader stretch from "using imagination" wording to "not think about what they see". All from above makes E incorrect.
Re: Historian: Radio drama requires its listeners to think about what they &nbs [#permalink] 21 Mar 2018, 09:27
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