Summer is Coming! Join the Game of Timers Competition to Win Epic Prizes. Registration is Open. Game starts Mon July 1st.

It is currently 19 Jul 2019, 03:23

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Intern
Intern
User avatar
S
Joined: 22 May 2014
Posts: 26
Location: India
GMAT 1: 560 Q46 V29
GPA: 3.64
Reviews Badge
Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 28 Mar 2019, 07:19
2
8
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 176 sessions

58% (03:16) correct 42% (03:38) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 204 sessions

41% (01:03) correct 59% (01:29) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 189 sessions

52% (00:47) correct 48% (00:59) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 4
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 185 sessions

69% (01:22) correct 31% (01:43) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 181 sessions

43% (01:31) correct 57% (01:40) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 6
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 169 sessions

44% (01:19) correct 56% (01:28) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

New Project RC Butler 2019 - Practice 2 RC Passages Everyday
Passage # 112, Date : 28-MAR-2019
This post is a part of New Project RC Butler 2019. Click here for Details


Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent who lived in the English colonies of North America during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were better off than either the contemporary women in England or the colonists’ own nineteenth-century daughters and granddaughters. The “golden age” theory originated in the 1920s with the work of Elizabeth Dexter, who argued that there were relatively few women among the colonists, and that all hands—male and female—were needed to sustain the growing settlements. Rigid sex-role distinctions could not exist under such circumstances; female colonists could accordingly engage in whatever occupations they wished, encountering few legal or social constraints if they sought employment outside the home. The surplus of male colonists also gave women crucial bargaining power in the marriage market since women’s contributions were vital to the survival of colonial households.

Dexter’s portrait of female colonists living under conditions of rough equality with their male counterparts was eventually incorporated into studies of nineteenth-century middle-class women. The contrast between the self-sufficient colonial woman and the oppressed nineteenth-century woman, confined to her home by stultifying ideologies of domesticity and by the fact that industrialization eliminated employment opportunities for middle-class women, gained an extraordinarily tenacious hold on historians. Even scholars who have questioned the “golden age” view of colonial women’s status have continued to accept the paradigm of a nineteenth-century decline from a more desirable past. For example, Joan Hoff-Wilson asserted that there was no “golden age” and yet emphasized that the nineteenth century brought “increased loss of function and authentic status for” middle-class women.

Recent publications about colonial women have exposed the concept of a decline in status as simplistic and unsophisticated, a theory that based its assessment of colonial women’s status solely on one factor (their economic function in society) and assumed all too readily that a relatively simple social system automatically brought higher standing to colonial women. The new scholarship presents a far more complicated picture, one in which definitions of gender roles, the colonial economy, demographic patterns, religion, the law, and household organization all contributed to defining the circumstances of colonial women’s lives. Indeed, the primary concern of modern scholarship is not to generalize about women’s status but to identify the specific changes and continuities in women’s lives during the colonial period. For example, whereas earlier historians suggested that there was little change for colonial women before 1800, the new scholarship suggests that a three-part chronological division more accurately reflects colonial women’s experiences. First was the initial period of English colonization (from the 1620s to about 1660); then a period during which patterns of family and community were challenged and reshaped (roughly from 1660 to 1750); and finally the era of revolution (approximately 1750 to 1815), which brought other changes to women’s lives.

1. Which one of the following best expresses the main idea of the passage?

(A) An earlier theory about the status of middle-class women in the nineteenth century has been supported by recent scholarship.
(B) Recent studies of middle-class nineteenth-century women have altered an earlier theory about the status of colonial women.
(C) Recent scholarship has exposed an earlier theory about the status of colonial women as too narrowly based and oversimplified.
(D) An earlier theory about colonial women has greatly influenced recent studies on middle-class women in the nineteenth century.
(E) An earlier study of middle-class women was based on insufficient research on the status of women in the nineteenth century.


2. The author discusses Hoff-Wilson (Highlighted) primarily in order to

(A) describe how Dexter’s theory was refuted by historians of nineteenth-century North America
(B) describe how the theory of middle-class women’s nineteenth-century decline in status was developed
(C) describe an important influence on recent scholarship about the colonial period
(D) demonstrate the persistent influence of the “golden age” theory
(E) provide an example of current research one the colonial period


3. It can be inferred from the passage that the author would be most likely to describe the views of the scholars (Highlighted) as

(A) unassailable
(B) innovative
(C) paradoxical
(D) overly sophisticated
(E) without merit


4. It can be inferred from the passage that in proposing the “three-part chronological division” (Highlighted), scholars recognized which one of the following?

(A) The circumstances of colonial women’s lives were defined by a broad variety of social and economic factors.
(B) Women’s lives in the English colonies of North America were similar to women’s lives in seventeenth-and eighteenth-century England.
(C) Colonial women’s status was adversely affected when patterns of family and community were established in the late seventeenth century.
(D) Colonial women’s status should be assessed primarily on the basis of their economic function in society.
(E) Colonial women’s status was low when the colonies were settled but changed significantly during the era of revolution.


5. According to the author, the publications about colonial women mentioned in the third paragraph had which one of the following effects?

(A) They undermined Dexter’s argument on the status of women colonists during the colonial period.
(B) They revealed the tenacity of the “golden age” theory in American history.
(C) They provided support for historians, such as Hoff-Wilson. Who study the nineteenth century.
(D) They established that women’s status did not change significantly from the colonial period to the nineteenth century.
(E) They provided support for earlier theories about women colonists in the English colonies of North America.


6. Practitioners of the new scholarship discussed in the last paragraph would be most likely to agree with which one of the following statements about Dexter’s argument?

(A) It makes the assumption that women’s status is determined primarily by their political power in society.
(B) It makes the assumption that a less complex social system necessarily confers higher status on women.
(C) It is based on inadequate research on women’s economic role in the colonies.
(D) It places too much emphasis on the way definitions of gender roles affected women colonists in the colonial period.
(E) It accurately describes the way women’s status declined in the nineteenth century.



  • Source: LSAT Official PrepTest 16 (September 1995)
  • Difficulty Level: 700

Originally posted by sarasjain20 on 07 Jun 2018, 00:05.
Last edited by SajjadAhmad on 28 Mar 2019, 07:19, edited 2 times in total.
Updated
MBA Section Director
User avatar
V
Affiliations: GMATClub
Joined: 22 May 2017
Posts: 2558
GPA: 4
WE: Engineering (Computer Software)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2018, 21:12

+1 kudos to the posts containing answer explanations of all questions


_________________
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 24 Jun 2012
Posts: 378
Location: Pakistan
Concentration: Strategy, International Business
GPA: 3.76
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Sep 2018, 23:12
workout nice passage, i guess its difficulty level should be 650
10 mins and all correct
_________________
Push yourself again and again. Don't give an inch until the final buzzer sounds. -Larry Bird
Success isn't something that just happens - success is learned, success is practiced and then it is shared. -Sparky Anderson
-S
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: ----__----___-----____-----
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 3062
Location: Pakistan
GPA: 3.39
Re: Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Mar 2019, 07:10
1
Bumping up for Discussion
_________________
New Project RC Butler 2019 - Practice 2 RC Passages Everyday
Final days of the GMAT Exam? => All GMAT Flashcards.
This Post Helps = Press +1 Kudos
Best of Luck on the GMAT!!
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2018
Posts: 2
Re: Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Mar 2019, 05:01
How is it 6. B? Can someone explain?

Posted from my mobile device
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: ----__----___-----____-----
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 3062
Location: Pakistan
GPA: 3.39
Re: Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Mar 2019, 10:54
Hello srial

Explanation


6. Practitioners of the new scholarship discussed in the last paragraph would be most likely to agree with which one of the following statements about Dexter’s argument?

Explanation

This choice echoes the criticism leveled against Dexter’s “golden age” theory (Highlighted).

(A) and (D) The scholars mentioned in para 3 argue that Dexter’s thinking concentrates on economic factors to the exclusion of all others.
(C) If anything, these scholars suggest that Dexter goes overboard in her economic analysis.
(E) Au contraire. These scholars “exposed the concept of a decline in status [in the 19th century] as simplistic and unsophisticated” (1st line in the 3rd para).

• Note how this question, like most of the others in this set, requires you to be clear about the fundamental contrast in the passage between traditional and new scholarship on colonial women. On test day, be sure not to get so bogged down in details that you overlook the essential purpose and structure of the text.

Answer: B


Hope it helps

srial wrote:
How is it 6. B? Can someone explain?

Posted from my mobile device

_________________
New Project RC Butler 2019 - Practice 2 RC Passages Everyday
Final days of the GMAT Exam? => All GMAT Flashcards.
This Post Helps = Press +1 Kudos
Best of Luck on the GMAT!!
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 22 May 2018
Posts: 52
Re: Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Apr 2019, 11:15
1
Quote:
6. Practitioners of the new scholarship discussed in the last paragraph would be most likely to agree with which one of the following statements about Dexter’s argument?


New scholarship argument is that decline in colonial women's status is due to gender roles, the colonial economy, demographic patterns, religion, the law, and household organization whereas Dexter's argument is that decline in status is solely due to one factor (their economic function in society). So both of them are agreeing to the point that there is decline in women's status.
I don't understand how we can infer that Dexter and Practitioners agreed upon the fact that less complex social system necessarily confers higher status on women.

Can anyone please shed some light?
_________________
Kudos if you liked my post. Please help me reach next level.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 17 Sep 2018
Posts: 40
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Apr 2019, 04:48
Note: I got question 3 wrong - and even though I have myself to blame - wondering if it should more accurately refer to the particular part of the passage? Just a pedantic comment.

If you enjoy reading any type of history this is an okay passage. If not, it can be challenging. Generally, women's issues appear to come up regularly on the GMAT and you might as well get used to dealing with them (the passages, not the issues; though feminist causes are great). I did sketch out a few notes for each para., which looked like this (and that were changed slightly as I continued reading the passage):

1. Women = men (colonial era) -> why
2. Golden Age -> 19th theory + other academics
3. GA -> simplistic -> why (+recent analysis)

I did not want to do the above "sketching" but it is an important habit in my opinion as it makes you focus on the passage and its content.

I will explain Question 3 (that I got wrong) and Question 6 (which people are concerned with).

Question 3: I picked E ("without merit"). The author criticizes the "Golden Age" scholars but probably with more depth and sophistication then simply labeling their arguments "without merit". "Paradoxical" would be a great way to describe the GA theorists because on the one hand such theorists label this era as "Golden Age", yet on the other it appears to contradict what the type of theories the authors sets out later on (I know this is not the biggest in-depth analysis, but I hope it helps someone). Vocabulary is important here and it is helpful if you have come across or used any of the words in the answer choices.

Question 6: This is challenging and narrowed it down to B and D. I think D is wrong as gender roles are not actually discussed - they are mentioned but not scrutinised. B is the more obvious one: Dexter's argument is criticized in that it is too "simplistic". Most recent academics have shown that social systems in the colonial era were actually more complex and changing - and that may have had an impact on the role of women.
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: ----__----___-----____-----
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 3062
Location: Pakistan
GPA: 3.39
Re: Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Apr 2019, 12:58
1
1
Hello varshithr

medic19

I hope it will help

Explanation


Topic and Scope: Women in colonial America; specifically, whether 17th- and 18th century colonial women were better off than their English counterparts and their 19th century offspring.

Purpose and Main Idea: The author’s purpose is to counter the traditional view of the status of 17th- and 18th-century colonial women; specifically, she suggests that the view of the 17th- and 18th-centuries as a “golden age” for colonial women is untenable.

Paragraph Structure:

Para 1 outlines the traditional view of women in 17th- and 18th-century colonial America, arguing that their supposedly favored position resulted from their small numbers, which opened up employment and family opportunities that their English contemporaries and their 19th-century offspring just didn’t have.

Para 2 continues the discussion of the traditional view, saying that it has been incorporated into many studies of 19th-century American women, thereby perpetuating and extending the notion that 17th- and 18th-century colonial American women lived in a “golden age.”

In Para 3, the author notes (with approval) that recent studies of colonial women have called into question the view that the status of women declined in the 19th-century. She argues that the picture is actually more complicated than the traditional view would have it.

The Big Picture:

• Although you might have predicted what the author was up to before reaching the passage’s last Para, her purpose and main idea aren’t made explicit until then. The moral here: A passage that begins with a lot of detail, a passage like this one, isn’t a great place to begin work on the RC section on test day. It’s best to start off with passages where you can grab onto authorial purpose by the end of the first 1/3.


1. Which one of the following best expresses the main idea of the passage?

Difficulty Level: 650

Explanation

This choice nicely captures the sentiment expressed in lines 32-38

(A) The earlier “golden age” theory in question isn’t about the status of 19th-century women, but rather about the status of 17th- and 18th-century women. And recent scholarship certainly hasn’t supported it.

(B) According to Para 2, studies of 19th-century middle-class women have simply incorporated the earlier “golden age” theory; they haven’t altered it.

(D) mistakenly blows up a detail in para 2 into the author’s main idea.

(E) Again, the author concentrates on the status of 17th- and 18th-century women. Discussion of scholarship on 19th-century women is largely confined to Para 2.

• When answering a global question, keep in mind that the correct answer must be broad enough to encompass the content of the entire passage, not just one part of it.

Answer: C


2. The author discusses Hoff-Wilson (Highlighted) primarily in order to

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

After describing the large impact of the “golden age” theory on scholarship about 19th century women at the beginning of Para 2, the author goes on to note that even academics like Joan Hoff-Wilson who dispute the notion of a golden age still accept the theory’s basic premise (that women in the 19th century were worse off than their 17th- and 18th-century predecessors).

(A) The author never claims that Dexter’s “golden age” theory was refuted by historians of 19th-century America. If anything, they’ve incorporated Dexter’s ideas into their work. Rather, scholars who concentrate on colonial women (i.e., 17th- and 18th-century women) are the ones who have overturned Dexter’s theory.

(B) falls outside the scope of the text, which doesn’t really trace the historical development of theories about 19th-century women.

(C) Recent scholarship on colonial women contradicts Hoff-Wilson’s work; thus, how could it be an important influence on that scholarship?

(E) Hoff-Wilson’s work is cited in the context of scholarship about 19th-century women, not colonial women.

• When a question asks you to figure out why the author included a detail—why he or she cited a fact, an opinion, a study, whatever—the context in which that detail appears is all-important. Read the lines around the detail in question to get a sense of its purpose in the text

Answer: D


3. It can be inferred from the passage that the author would be most likely to describe the views of the scholars (Highlighted) as

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

According to the author, the scholars mentioned in lines dispute the notion of a “golden age” for colonial women, yet they assert that colonial women were better off than their 19th-century counterparts. This view’s apparent internal contradiction might well lead the author to describe it as “paradoxical.”

(A) and (B) Since the author is critical of this view, she’d be unlikely to label it as “unassailable(A) or “innovative(B).

(D) In para 3, the author labels this view as “unsophisticated.” She wouldn’t reverse her opinion now.

(E) “Without merit” is too strongly negative. She never suggests that this view is entirely inaccurate, just that it seems to contain an internal contradiction. This choice is too extreme and can be eliminated.

• Again, in questions that ask you to assess the author’s attitude toward something in the passage, be cautious about endorsing extreme-sounding choices.

Answer: C


4. It can be inferred from the passage that in proposing the “three-part chronological division” (Highlighted), scholars recognized which one of the following?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

The same scholars who have recognized that colonial women’s lives “were defined by a broad variety of social and economic factors” have proposed the “three-part chronological division” in order to explore the changing impact of those factors over time.

(B) distorts a detail from the wrong part of the passage, Para 1. The scholars who have proposed this chronological division aren’t the ones who have compared colonial American women to their English contemporaries.

(C) Lines indicate that those scholars who’ve proposed the chronological division aren’t overly concerned with generalizations about the status of colonial women.

(D) Au contraire. The scholars who advocate the chronological division are the same ones who argue that colonial women’s lives were influenced by a broad array of factors.

(E) Again, these scholars aren’t very concerned with generalizations about women’s status.

• Note that choices (C) and (E) are wrong for the same reason. Many LSAT questions will contain two or more choices that are wrong for more or less the same exact reason.

Answer: A


5. According to the author, the publications about colonial women mentioned in the third paragraph had which one of the following effects?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

Lines reveal that the “golden age” theory, which rests on Dexter’s work, has been “undermined” by recent scholarship on colonial women.

(B) It’s the studies of 19th-century women, not the scholarship brought up in Para 3, that demonstrates the staying power of the “golden age” theory in American history.

(C) and (E) Au contraire. This scholarship contradicts the basic premise in historical works like Hoff-Wilson’s, which themselves are indebted to earlier theories.

(D) True, these studies deny that women’s status declined over the centuries; but this doesn’t mean that they claim there was no change whatsoever in that status.

• This question, like a number of others in this set, plays on information near the end of the passage. On test day, don’t let your concentration trail off as you near the end of a passage—if you do, you might lose out on scoring some valuable points.

Answer: A


6. Practitioners of the new scholarship discussed in the last paragraph would be most likely to agree with which one of the following statements about Dexter’s argument?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

This choice echoes the criticism leveled against Dexter’s “golden age” theory (Highlighted).

(A) and (D) The scholars mentioned in para 3 argue that Dexter’s thinking concentrates on economic factors to the exclusion of all others.
(C) If anything, these scholars suggest that Dexter goes overboard in her economic analysis.
(E) Au contraire. These scholars “exposed the concept of a decline in status [in the 19th century] as simplistic and unsophisticated” (1st line in the 3rd para).

• Note how this question, like most of the others in this set, requires you to be clear about the fundamental contrast in the passage between traditional and new scholarship on colonial women. On test day, be sure not to get so bogged down in details that you overlook the essential purpose and structure of the text.

Answer: B

_________________
New Project RC Butler 2019 - Practice 2 RC Passages Everyday
Final days of the GMAT Exam? => All GMAT Flashcards.
This Post Helps = Press +1 Kudos
Best of Luck on the GMAT!!
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 25 Jun 2018
Posts: 3
Re: Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Jun 2019, 05:08
Can someone please explain how is the view of historians(highlighted) is paradoxical? Is this question referring to the view of only Joan-Hoff Wilson?
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent   [#permalink] 05 Jun 2019, 05:08
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Historians have long accepted the notion that women of English descent

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne