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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
holy creep, this sucked almost 10 minutes , !@#$ . anyway managed to nail this down , except q 1 , which i got wrong after giving almost 3 min to that one single question, finished reading the passage in 3:16 min, and then q 1 sucked almost 3 min. i should have got q1 right in less than 1 min

seems Parkinson's law is at play here .
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
The passage quotes:
"Many families retain ties in Latin America and move back and forth between their present and former communities. "

Hence the answer choice B for question 1 seems to be incorrect.
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
deepakpatter wrote:
rohitmanglik wrote:
Wow!!! got all of them wrong :/

Explanation please

1. It can be inferred from the passage that one of the characteristics of immigrant groups to the United States has traditionally been that, after immigration, relatively few members of the group
(A) became politically active in their new communities
(B) moved back and forth repeatedly between the United States and their former communities Directly infer able from the text
(C) used their native languages in their new communities. This is not a characteristic
(D) suffered discrimination in their new communities at the hands of the cultural majority. NOPE
(E) sought assimilation into the dominant culture of the new communities they were entering


2. The passage suggests that one of the effects of the debate over bilingual education is that it has
(A) given the Hispanic community a new-found pride in its culture. totally out..!
(B) hampered the education of Spanish-speaking students. not infer able
(C) demonstrated the negative impact on imposing English as the official United States language. No demonstration of this is there
(D) provided a common banner under which the Spanish-speaking communities could rally. Read the last lines of the paragraph
(E) polarized the opinions of local Spanish-speaking community leaders


3. In lines 38-39, the phrase “different political agendas” refers specifically to conflicting opinions regarding the
(A) means of legislating the assimilation of minorities into United States society
(B) methods of inducing Hispanics to adopt English as their primary language. no methods suggested
(C) means of achieving nondiscriminatory education for Hispanics. same as B
(D) official given responsibility for decisions regarding bilingual education. nope..!!
(E) extent to which Hispanics should blend into the larger United States society. this gives the clear picture.


4. In lines 64-65 the author says that “It would be unwise to require the universal use of English.” One reason for this, according to the author, is that
(A) [color=#00ff00]it is not clear yet whether requiring the universal use of English would promote or hinder the education of children whose English is limited[/color]
(B) the nation’s Hispanic leaders have shown that bilingual education is most effective when it includes the maintenance of the Spanish language in the schools. SHOWN (X)
(C) requiring the universal use of English would reduce the cohesion of the nation’s Hispanic communities and leadership
(D) the question of language in the schools should be answered by those who evaluate bilingual education, not by people with specific political agendas. Rubbish
(E) it has been shown that bilingual education is necessary to avoid disadvantaging in their general learning children whose English is limited. Shown means proven, which is not


5. In the last paragraph, the author of the passage is primarily concerned with discussing
(A) reasons against enacting a measure that would mandate the forced inclusion of immigrant groups within the dominant United culture
(B) the virtues and limitations of declaring English the official language of the United States
(C) the history of attitudes within the Hispanic community toward bilingual education in the United States. History (X)
(D) the importance for immigrant groups of maintaining large segments of their culture to pass on to their children. No importance discussed
(E) the difference in cultures between Hispanics and other immigrant groups in the United States. No differences suggested


Quite enough of detailing
Well that is something I needed
Thnx 4 the post
I am planning to give gmat in April
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measure of assimilation into the larger United States society. Generally languages define social groups and provide justification for social structures. Hence, a distinctive language sets a cultural group off from the dominant language group. Throughout United States history this pattern has resulted in one consistent, unhappy consequence, discrimination against members of the cultural minority. Language differences provide both a way to rationalize subordination and a ready means for achieving it.
Traditionally, English has replaced the native language of immigrant groups by the second or third generation. Some characteristics of today’s Spanish-speaking population, however, suggest the possibility of a departure from this historical pattern. Many families retain ties in Latin America and move back and forth between their present and former communities. This “revolving door” phenomenon, along with the high probability of additional immigrants from the south, means that large Spanish-speaking communities are likely to exist in the United States for the indefinite future.
This expectation underlies the call for national support for bilingual education in Spanish-speaking communities’ public schools. Bilingual education can serve different purposes, however. In the 1960s, such programs were established to facilitate the learning of English so as to avoid disadvantaging children in their other subjects because of their limited English. More recently, many advocates have viewed bilingual education as a means to maintain children’s native languages and cultures. The issue is important for people with different political agendas, from absorption at one pole to separatism at the other.
To date, the evaluations of bilingual education’s impact on learning have been inconclusive. The issue of bilingual education has, nevertheless, served to unite the leadership of the nation’s Hispanic communities. Grounded in concerns about status that are directly traceable to the United States history of discrimination against Hispanics, the demand for maintenance of the Spanish language in the schools is an assertion of the worth of a people and their culture. If the United States is truly a multicultural nation—that is, if it is one culture reflecting the contributions of many—this demand should be seen as a demand not for separation but for inclusion.
More direct efforts to force inclusion can be misguided. For example, movements to declare English the official language do not truly advance the cohesion of a multicultural nation. They alienate the twenty million people who do not speak English as their mother tongue. They are unnecessary since the public’s business is already conducted largely in English. Further, given the present state of understanding about the effects of bilingual education on learning, it would be unwise to require the universal use of English. Finally, it is for parents and local communities to choose the path they will follow, including how much of their culture they want to maintain for their children.

1. It can be inferred from the passage that one of the characteristics of immigrant groups to the United States has traditionally been that, after immigration, relatively few members of the group
(A) became politically active in their new communities
(B) moved back and forth repeatedly between the United States and their former communities
(C) used their native languages in their new communities
(D) suffered discrimination in their new communities at the hands of the cultural majority
(E) sought assimilation into the dominant culture of the new communities they were entering


2.The passage suggests that one of the effects of the debate over bilingual education is that it has
(A) given the Hispanic community a new-found pride in its culture
(B) hampered the education of Spanish-speaking students
(C) demonstrated the negative impact on imposing English as the official United States language
(D) provided a common banner under which the Spanish-speaking communities could rally
(E) polarized the opinions of local Spanish-speaking community leaders

3.In lines 38-39, the phrase “different political agendas” refers specifically to conflicting opinions regarding the
(A) means of legislating the assimilation of minorities into United States society
(B) methods of inducing Hispanics to adopt English as their primary language
(C) means of achieving nondiscriminatory education for Hispanics
(D) official given responsibility for decisions regarding bilingual education
(E) extent to which Hispanics should blend into the larger United States society

4.In lines 64-65 the author says that “It would be unwise to require the universal use of English.” One reason for this, according to the author, is that
(A) it is not clear yet whether requiring the universal use of English would promote or hinder the education of children whose English is limited
(B) the nation’s Hispanic leaders have shown that bilingual education is most effective when it includes the maintenance of the Spanish language in the schools
(C) requiring the universal use of English would reduce the cohesion of the nation’s Hispanic communities and leadership
(D) the question of language in the schools should be answered by those who evaluate bilingual education, not by people with specific political agendas
(E) it has been shown that bilingual education is necessary to avoid disadvantaging in their general learning children whose English is limited

5.In the last paragraph, the author of the passage is primarily concerned with discussing
(A) reasons against enacting a measure that would mandate the forced inclusion of immigrant groups within the dominant United culture
(B) the virtues and limitations of declaring English the official language of the United States
(C) the history of attitudes within the Hispanic community toward bilingual education in the United States
(D) the importance for immigrant groups of maintaining large segments of their culture to pass on to their children
(E) the difference in cultures between Hispanics and other immigrant groups in the United States

Originally posted by mayurg on 06 Sep 2017, 08:47.
Last edited by broall on 06 Sep 2017, 18:09, edited 1 time in total.
Merged post. Please search before posting
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measure of assimilation into the larger United States society. Generally languages define social groups and provide justification for social structures. Hence, a distinctive language sets a cultural group off from the dominant language group. Throughout United States history this pattern has resulted in one consistent, unhappy consequence, discrimination against members of the cultural minority. Language differences provide both a way to rationalize subordination and a ready means for achieving it.
Traditionally, English has replaced the native language of immigrant groups by the second or third generation. Some characteristics of today’s Spanish-speaking population, however, suggest the possibility of a departure from this historical pattern. Many families retain ties in Latin America and move back and forth between their present and former communities. This “revolving door” phenomenon, along with the high probability of additional immigrants from the south, means that large Spanish-speaking communities are likely to exist in the United States for the indefinite future.
This expectation underlies the call for national support for bilingual education in Spanish-speaking communities’ public schools. Bilingual education can serve different purposes, however. In the 1960s, such programs were established to facilitate the learning of English so as to avoid disadvantaging children in their other subjects because of their limited English. More recently, many advocates have viewed bilingual education as a means to maintain children’s native languages and cultures. The issue is important for people with different political agendas, from absorption at one pole to separatism at the other.
To date, the evaluations of bilingual education’s impact on learning have been inconclusive. The issue of bilingual education has, nevertheless, served to unite the leadership of the nation’s Hispanic communities. Grounded in concerns about status that are directly traceable to the United States history of discrimination against Hispanics, the demand for maintenance of the Spanish language in the schools is an assertion of the worth of a people and their culture. If the United States is truly a multicultural nation—that is, if it is one culture reflecting the contributions of many—this demand should be seen as a demand not for separation but for inclusion.
More direct efforts to force inclusion can be misguided. For example, movements to declare English the official language do not truly advance the cohesion of a multicultural nation. They alienate the twenty million people who do not speak English as their mother tongue. They are unnecessary since the public’s business is already conducted largely in English. Further, given the present state of understanding about the effects of bilingual education on learning, it would be unwise to require the universal use of English. Finally, it is for parents and local communities to choose the path they will follow, including how much of their culture they want to maintain for their children.
1. It can be inferred from the passage that one of the characteristics of immigrant groups to the United States has traditionally been that, after immigration, relatively few members of the group
(A) became politically active in their new communities
(B) moved back and forth repeatedly between the United States and their former communities
(C) used their native languages in their new communities
(D) suffered discrimination in their new communities at the hands of the cultural majority
(E) sought assimilation into the dominant culture of the new communities they were entering
2. The passage suggests that one of the effects of the debate over bilingual education is that it has
(A) given the Hispanic community a new-found pride in its culture
(B) hampered the education of Spanish-speaking students
(C) demonstrated the negative impact on imposing English as the official United States language
(D) provided a common banner under which the Spanish-speaking communities could rally
(E) polarized the opinions of local Spanish-speaking community leaders
3. In lines 38-39, the phrase “different political agendas” refers specifically to conflicting opinions regarding the
(A) means of legislating the assimilation of minorities into United States society
(B) methods of inducing Hispanics to adopt English as their primary language
(C) means of achieving nondiscriminatory education for Hispanics
(D) official given responsibility for decisions regarding bilingual education
(E) extent to which Hispanics should blend into the larger United States society
4. In lines 64-65 the author says that “It would be unwise to require the universal use of English.” One reason for this, according to the author, is that
(A) it is not clear yet whether requiring the universal use of English would promote or hinder the education of children whose English is limited
(B) the nation’s Hispanic leaders have shown that bilingual education is most effective when it includes the maintenance of the Spanish language in the schools
(C) requiring the universal use of English would reduce the cohesion of the nation’s Hispanic communities and leadership
(D) the question of language in the schools should be answered by those who evaluate bilingual education, not by people with specific political agendas
(E) it has been shown that bilingual education is necessary to avoid disadvantaging in their general learning children whose English is limited
5. In the last paragraph, the author of the passage is primarily concerned with discussing
(A) reasons against enacting a measure that would mandate the forced inclusion of immigrant groups within the dominant United culture
(B) the virtues and limitations of declaring English the official language of the United States
(C) the history of attitudes within the Hispanic community toward bilingual education in the United States
(D) the importance for immigrant groups of maintaining large segments of their culture to pass on to their children
(E) the difference in cultures between Hispanics and other immigrant groups in the United States
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
3
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vksunder wrote:
Quote:
Part of New RC Series- Please check this link for more questions


Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measure of assimilation into the larger United States society. Generally languages define social groups and provide justification for social structures. Hence, a distinctive language sets a cultural group off from the dominant language group. Throughout United States history this pattern has resulted in one consistent, unhappy consequence, discrimination against members of the cultural minority. Language differences provide both a way to rationalize subordination and a ready means for achieving it.

Traditionally, English has replaced the native language of immigrant groups by the second or third generation. Some characteristics of today’s Spanish-speaking population, however, suggest the possibility of a departure from this historical pattern. Many families retain ties in Latin America and move back and forth between their present and former communities. This “revolving door” phenomenon, along with the high probability of additional immigrants from the south, means that large Spanish-speaking communities are likely to exist in the United States for the indefinite future.

This expectation underlies the call for national support for bilingual education in Spanish-speaking communities’ public schools. Bilingual education can serve different purposes, however. In the 1960s, such programs were established to facilitate the learning of English so as to avoid disadvantaging children in their other subjects because of their limited English. More recently, many advocates have viewed bilingual education as a means to maintain children’s native languages and cultures. The issue is important for people with different political agendas, from absorption at one pole to separatism at the other.

To date, the evaluations of bilingual education’s impact on learning have been inconclusive. The issue of bilingual education has, nevertheless, served to unite the leadership of the nation’s Hispanic communities. Grounded in concerns about status that are directly traceable to the United States history of discrimination against Hispanics, the demand for maintenance of the Spanish language in the schools is an assertion of the worth of a people and their culture. If the United States is truly a multicultural nation—that is, if it is one culture reflecting the contributions of many—this demand should be seen as a demand not for separation but for inclusion.

More direct efforts to force inclusion can be misguided. For example, movements to declare English the official language do not truly advance the cohesion of a multicultural nation. They alienate the twenty million people who do not speak English as their mother tongue. They are unnecessary since the public’s business is already conducted largely in English. Further, given the present state of understanding about the effects of bilingual education on learning, it would be unwise to require the universal use of English. Finally, it is for parents and local communities to choose the path they will follow, including how much of their culture they want to maintain for their children.
1. It can be inferred from the passage that one of the characteristics of immigrant groups to the United States has traditionally been that, after immigration, relatively few members of the group
(A) became politically active in their new communities
(B) moved back and forth repeatedly between the United States and their former communities

"Traditionally, English has replaced the native language of immigrant groups by the second or third generation. Some characteristics of today’s Spanish-speaking population, however, suggest the possibility of a departure from this historical pattern. Many families retain ties in Latin America and move back and forth between their present and former communities. "

(C) used their native languages in their new communities
(D) suffered discrimination in their new communities at the hands of the cultural majority
(E) sought assimilation into the dominant culture of the new communities they were entering



2. The passage suggests that one of the effects of the debate over bilingual education is that it has
(A) given the Hispanic community a new-found pride in its culture
(B) hampered the education of Spanish-speaking students
(C) demonstrated the negative impact on imposing English as the official United States language
(D) provided a common banner under which the Spanish-speaking communities could rally

"The issue of bilingual education has, nevertheless, served to unite the leadership of the nation’s Hispanic communities"

(E) polarized the opinions of local Spanish-speaking community leaders



3. In lines 38-39, the phrase “different political agendas” refers specifically to conflicting opinions regarding the
(A) means of legislating the assimilation of minorities into United States society
(B) methods of inducing Hispanics to adopt English as their primary language
(C) means of achieving nondiscriminatory education for Hispanics
(D) official given responsibility for decisions regarding bilingual education
(E) extent to which Hispanics should blend into the larger United States society

"The issue is important for people with different political agendas, from absorption at one pole to separatism at the other."



4. In lines 64-65 the author says that “It would be unwise to require the universal use of English.” One reason for this, according to the author, is that
(A) it is not clear yet whether requiring the universal use of English would promote or hinder the education of children whose English is limited

"To date, the evaluations of bilingual education’s impact on learning have been inconclusive."
"Further, given the present state of understanding about the effects of bilingual education on learning, it would be unwise to require the universal use of English."


(B) the nation’s Hispanic leaders have shown that bilingual education is most effective when it includes the maintenance of the Spanish language in the schools
(C) requiring the universal use of English would reduce the cohesion of the nation’s Hispanic communities and leadership
(D) the question of language in the schools should be answered by those who evaluate bilingual education, not by people with specific political agendas
(E) it has been shown that bilingual education is necessary to avoid disadvantaging in their general learning children whose English is limited



5. In the last paragraph, the author of the passage is primarily concerned with discussing
(A) reasons against enacting a measure that would mandate the forced inclusion of immigrant groups within the dominant United culture

Whole of last Para is giving reasons: "More direct efforts to force inclusion can be misguided...They alienate the twenty million people who do not speak English as their mother tongue. They are unnecessary since the public’s business is already conducted largely in English. Further, given the present state of understanding about the effects of bilingual education on learning, it would be unwise to require the universal use of English. Finally, it is for parents and local communities to choose the path they will follow, including how much of their culture they want to maintain for their children."

(B) the virtues and limitations of declaring English the official language of the United States
(C) the history of attitudes within the Hispanic community toward bilingual education in the United States
(D) the importance for immigrant groups of maintaining large segments of their culture to pass on to their children
(E) the difference in cultures between Hispanics and other immigrant groups in the United States


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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
3. In lines 38-39, the phrase “different political agendas” refers specifically to conflicting opinions regarding the
(A) means of legislating the assimilation of minorities into United States society
(B) methods of inducing Hispanics to adopt English as their primary language
(C) means of achieving nondiscriminatory education for Hispanics
(D) official given responsibility for decisions regarding bilingual education
(E) extent to which Hispanics should blend into the larger United States society

dabaobao VeritasKarishma workout abhimahna

Could you please help me with question#3.

I am not able to relate this at all.
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
Hi SajjadAhmad

This is a good passage, however the formatting and presentation is not good.

a. Questions are not in Bold
b. Respective portions in the passage is not highlighted

Could you make the changes, thanks
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
Expert Reply
hero_with_1000_faces wrote:
Hi SajjadAhmad

This is a good passage, however the formatting and presentation is not good.

a. Questions are not in Bold
b. Respective portions in the passage is not highlighted

Could you make the changes, thanks


  • Bolded the question statements
  • Positioned the timer before the question
  • Highlighted the related text.
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Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
1
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Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measure of assimilation into the larger United States society. Generally languages define social groups and provide justification for social structures. Hence, a distinctive language sets a cultural group off from the dominant language group. Throughout United States history this pattern has resulted in one consistent, unhappy consequence, discrimination against members of the cultural minority. Language differences provide both a way to rationalize subordination and a ready means for achieving it.

Traditionally, English has replaced the native language of immigrant groups by the second or third generation. Some characteristics of today’s Spanish-speaking population, however, suggest the possibility of a departure from this historical pattern. Many families retain ties in Latin America and move back and forth between their present and former communities. This “revolving door” phenomenon, along with the high probability of additional immigrants from the south, means that large Spanish-speaking communities are likely to exist in the United States for the indefinite future.

This expectation underlies the call for national support for bilingual education in Spanish-speaking communities’ public schools. Bilingual education can serve different purposes, however. In the 1960s, such programs were established to facilitate the learning of English so as to avoid disadvantaging children in their other subjects because of their limited English. More recently, many advocates have viewed bilingual education as a means to maintain children’s native languages and cultures. The issue is important for people with different political agendas, from absorption at one pole to separatism at the other.

To date, the evaluations of bilingual education’s impact on learning have been inconclusive. The issue of bilingual education has, nevertheless, served to unite the leadership of the nation’s Hispanic communities. Grounded in concerns about status that are directly traceable to the United States history of discrimination against Hispanics, the demand for maintenance of the Spanish language in the schools is an assertion of the worth of a people and their culture. If the United States is truly a multicultural nation—that is, if it is one culture reflecting the contributions of many—this demand should be seen as a demand not for separation but for inclusion.

More direct efforts to force inclusion can be misguided. For example, movements to declare English the official language do not truly advance the cohesion of a multicultural nation. They alienate the twenty million people who do not speak English as their mother tongue. They are unnecessary since the public’s business is already conducted largely in English. Further, given the present state of understanding about the effects of bilingual education on learning, it would be unwise to require the universal use of English. Finally, it is for parents and local communities to choose the path they will follow, including how much of their culture they want to maintain for their children.


1. It can be inferred from the passage that one of the characteristics of immigrant groups to the United States has traditionally been that, after immigration, relatively few members of the group

(A) became politically active in their new communities
(B) moved back and forth repeatedly between the United States and their former communities
(C) used their native languages in their new communities
(D) suffered discrimination in their new communities at the hands of the cultural majority
(E) sought assimilation into the dominant culture of the new communities they were entering


2. The passage suggests that one of the effects of the debate over bilingual education is that it has

(A) given the Hispanic community a new-found pride in its culture
(B) hampered the education of Spanish-speaking students
(C) demonstrated the negative impact on imposing English as the official United States language
(D) provided a common banner under which the Spanish-speaking communities could rally
(E) polarized the opinions of local Spanish-speaking community leaders


3. In lines 38-39, the phrase “different political agendas” refers specifically to conflicting opinions regarding the

(A) means of legislating the assimilation of minorities into United States society
(B) methods of inducing Hispanics to adopt English as their primary language
(C) means of achieving nondiscriminatory education for Hispanics
(D) official given responsibility for decisions regarding bilingual education
(E) extent to which Hispanics should blend into the larger United States society


4. In lines 64-65 the author says that “It would be unwise to require the universal use of English.” One reason for this, according to the author, is that

(A) it is not clear yet whether requiring the universal use of English would promote or hinder the education of children whose English is limited
(B) the nation’s Hispanic leaders have shown that bilingual education is most effective when it includes the maintenance of the Spanish language in the schools
(C) requiring the universal use of English would reduce the cohesion of the nation’s Hispanic communities and leadership
(D) the question of language in the schools should be answered by those who evaluate bilingual education, not by people with specific political agendas
(E) it has been shown that bilingual education is necessary to avoid disadvantaging in their general learning children whose English is limited


5. In the last paragraph, the author of the passage is primarily concerned with discussing

(A) reasons against enacting a measure that would mandate the forced inclusion of immigrant groups within the dominant United culture
(B) the virtues and limitations of declaring English the official language of the United States
(C) the history of attitudes within the Hispanic community toward bilingual education in the United States
(D) the importance for immigrant groups of maintaining large segments of their culture to pass on to their children
(E) the difference in cultures between Hispanics and other immigrant groups in the United States


Originally posted by Arpitupadhyay on 05 Jan 2021, 10:25.
Last edited by Sajjad1994 on 19 Jan 2021, 05:32, edited 7 times in total.
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
Hi Arpitupadhyay,


Kindly edit the passage as per the following forum posting Rules

https://gmatclub.com/forum/rc-forum-rules-must-read-155874.html


Thanks.
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
Expert Reply
Welcome to GMAT Club!


Arpitupadhyay this was your first post so i have formatted the question for you, you can click on the edit button to check the codes working behind the format and follow those for any of your upcoming question. I have added the OAs copying from a third party website so i am not confident whether the answers are correct so if you or anybody finds any discrepancy in the OAs, please let me know. Alternatively you can tell me the LSAT Prep test number I can confirm the OAs then.

Thank you
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
Sajjad1994 wrote:
Welcome to GMAT Club!


Arpitupadhyay this was your first post so i have formatted the question for you, you can click on the edit button to check the codes working behind the format and follow those for any of your upcoming question. I have added the OAs copying from a third party website so i am not confident whether the answers are correct so if you or anybody finds any discrepancy in the OAs, please let me know. Alternatively you can tell me the LSAT Prep test number I can confirm the OAs then.

Thank you


Sajjad1994 Do we have the OE/OA for this one?
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
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CEdward wrote:

Sajjad1994 Do we have the OE/OA for this one?


The above passage was duplicate and i have merge the topic with the existing topic, all OAs are updated and you can now find a plenty of discussion also. Let me know if you need any thing else.

Thank you
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Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
HeySajjad1994
Can you please explain Q1 why option C is wrong and Q4 option A&C
Thanks ......

Originally posted by shuklaji on 17 Mar 2021, 05:04.
Last edited by shuklaji on 17 Mar 2021, 06:12, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
auradediligodo wrote:
Hi everyone,

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


P1

In paragraph one we are given the main topic of the passage: Language as a means of assimilation into the culture of US. The author then proceeds by saying that language affects also social structures and that this led to episodes of discriminations.

Purpose: The purpose of this paragraph is to highlight the role of language as a means of assimilation into a culture and claiming that in the US this phenomenon led to episodes of discrimination



P2

Here the author claims that usually after the second/third generation, immigrants replace the language of their ancestors with english as their primary language. Then we are given that this is not true for the Spanish communities in the US because the members of such communities go back and forth to their native lands and so they keep in touch with their traditions....

Purpose: The purpose of this paragraph is to claim that unlike other immigrants, the spanish immigrants in the US are likely to keep their identities/language/traditions



P3

Here the author analyses the purposes of bilingual schools. We are given that in the past such schools served the purpose of helping children to succeed also in english subjects while in the present they serve the purpose of preserving the traditions of such children. The the author claims that bilingual schools have an important role also in the political sphere as they can help either to integrate or to do the opposite.

Purpose: The purpose of this paragraph is to analyze the role of bilingual schools



P4

The author here claims that the studies above mentioned are inconclusive but that the considerations around bilingual schools served to unite spanish communities. As a matter of fact Spanish communities see bilingual schools as something that strengthens their culture and they feel valued by their presence. Lastly the author thinks that the latter view serves the purpose of uniting.

Purpose: The purpose here is to evaluate the impact of bilingual schools on the spanish communities



P5

In the last paragraph the author claims that forcing english as the official language in the US might be counterproductive a it would alienate those who do not speak it.

Purpose: The purpose here is to claim that declaring english as the official language would alienate and not unite people


Main point

The main point of this passage is to evaluate the impact of English as the primary language in the US, using the Spanish communities/bilingual schools to make a few considerations.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


1. It can be inferred from the passage that one of the characteristics of immigrant groups to the United States has traditionally been that, after immigration, relatively few members of the group

Pre-thinking

Inference question

Let's keep in mind P2 because in this paragraph we'll find all the information required


(A) became politically active in their new communities
Out of scope. Immigrants working in the political sphere are not even discussed throughout the passage

(B) moved back and forth repeatedly between the United States and their former communities
Yes. The reason why we can infer this is that the paragraph opens up with a claim:
Traditionally, English has replaced the native language of immigrant groups by the second or third generation. And then proceeds to explain the reasons why such statement does not apply to the Spanish communities. Such reason is that they went back and forth to their home countries.

So the author's logic is as follow: [b]The revolving phenomenon causes the retain of the Spanish language for Spanish immigrants.


We are asked to make an inference about the people who did not retain their language.

Hence we can infer that such people did not go back and forth to their original country because if so the would retain their original language.
[/b]

(C) used their native languages in their new communities
This option seems to be tempting. The reason why this option is wrong is that the entity discussed in the question stem is the immigrants in general and not immigrants after 2/3 generations.

(D) suffered discrimination in their new communities at the hands of the cultural majority
Cannot be inferred

(E) sought assimilation into the dominant culture of the new communities they were entering
cannot be inferred


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



2. The passage suggests that one of the effects of the debate over bilingual education is that it has

Pre-thinking

Inference question

The effects of bilingual education are discussed in P3 and P4


(A) given the Hispanic community a new-found pride in its culture
Inconsistent. The passage tells us that for the Spanish communities having their bilingual school was a way to feel valued but we cannot infer that it is a NEW feeling.

(B) hampered the education of Spanish-speaking students
The results of the studies about bilingual schools are inconclusive. Hence cannot be inferred

(C) demonstrated the negative impact on imposing English as the official United States language
Nothing is demonstrated per the passage

(D) provided a common banner under which the Spanish-speaking communities could rally
From P4: "The issue of bilingual education has, nevertheless, served to unite the leadership of the nation’s Hispanic communities. "

(E) polarized the opinions of local Spanish-speaking community leaders
cannot be inferred


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




3. In lines 38-39, the phrase “different political agendas” refers specifically to conflicting opinions regarding the

Pre-thinking

Detail question

From P3: "The issue is important for people with different political agendas, from absorption at one pole to separatism at the other."


(A) means of legislating the assimilation of minorities into United States society
Means of legislating are not discussed

(B) methods of inducing Hispanics to adopt English as their primary language
not in line with pre-thinking

(C) means of achieving nondiscriminatory education for Hispanics
not in line with pre-thinking

(D) official given responsibility for decisions regarding bilingual education
not in line with pre-thinking

(E) 2extent to which Hispanics should blend into the larger United States society
in line with pre-thinking


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



4. In lines 64-65 the author says that “It would be unwise to require the universal use of English.” One reason for this, according to the author, is that

Pre-thinking

Detail question

From the last paragraph one of the reason is: "given the present state of understanding about the effects of bilingual education on learning"


(A) it is not clear yet whether requiring the universal use of English would promote or hinder the education of children whose English is limited
in line with pre-thinking

(B) the nation’s Hispanic leaders have shown that bilingual education is most effective when it includes the maintenance of the Spanish language in the schools
Nothing of the sort has been showed

(C) requiring the universal use of English would reduce the cohesion of the nation’s Hispanic communities and leadership
not the reason

(D) the question of language in the schools should be answered by those who evaluate bilingual education, not by people with specific political agendas
out of scope

(E) it has been shown that bilingual education is necessary to avoid disadvantaging in their general learning children whose English is limited
not mentioned


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



5. In the last paragraph, the author of the passage is primarily concerned with discussing

Pre-thinking

Function question

The author wants to highlight why the introduction of english as the official language would be counterproductive for cohesion purposes


(A) reasons against enacting a measure that would mandate the forced inclusion of immigrant groups within the dominant United culture
In line with pre-thinking

(B) the virtues and limitations of declaring English the official language of the United States
The virtues are not discussed

(C) the history of attitudes within the Hispanic community toward bilingual education in the United States
Out of scope

(D) the importance for immigrant groups of maintaining large segments of their culture to pass on to their children
out of scope

(E) the difference in cultures between Hispanics and other immigrant groups in the United States
out of scope


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



It is a good day to be alive!


how much time did it take to create summary of each paragraph, how did you create the summary ? is there some trick coz I am usually unable to or it takes me too much time
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Immigrants’ adoption of English as their primary language is one measu [#permalink]
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etandon wrote:
The passage quotes:
"Many families retain ties in Latin America and move back and forth between their present and former communities. "

Hence the answer choice B for question 1 seems to be incorrect.



Even I had the same issue. The question talks about "Traditionally" what the immigrants did just after moving to the united states but the "correct" answer is the situation taking place in the current scenario. It clearly states in the passage that its a move away from historical patterns, the revolving phenomenon that is.

If somebody can elaborate. kindly...

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