GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Dec 2018, 11:18

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • 10 Keys to nail DS and CR questions

     December 17, 2018

     December 17, 2018

     06:00 PM PST

     07:00 PM PST

    Join our live webinar and learn how to approach Data Sufficiency and Critical Reasoning problems, how to identify the best way to solve each question and what most people do wrong.
  • R1 Admission Decisions: Estimated Decision Timelines and Chat Links for Major BSchools

     December 17, 2018

     December 17, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    From Dec 5th onward, American programs will start releasing R1 decisions. Chat Rooms: We have also assigned chat rooms for every school so that applicants can stay in touch and exchange information/update during decision period.

In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 05 Jan 2017
Posts: 21
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 690 Q50 V32
GPA: 3.3
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 May 2017, 14:02
mikemcgarry wrote:
windofchange wrote:
OA is (B) :(
I picked A because of the similar reasoning as Mike's. I have no clue why the correct answer is B

Dear windofchange,
Apparently, the GMAT tolerates more variation in this idiomatic structure than they did previously. Since this is the case, choice (B) is the best answer, as skyhawk eloquently explained. Let me know if you have any further questions.
Mike :-)


Dear mikemcgarry,

I was really confused with this question. The correct choice B looks very weird for me. Since I could find some fatal mistakes in all of the other four choices, I have to accept B. But I still have some concerns with B.

As in A, C,D, the correlation is described as " the closer one came to town (event A), the more the city air became acidic (event B)". Does this structure hint any logical direction between the event A and B? Does choice B, the city air became increasingly acidic (event B) the closer one came to town (event A), convey a different logical meaning?

Thx for your time in advance,
Victoria
Director
Director
avatar
S
Joined: 08 Jun 2010
Posts: 861
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 May 2017, 23:48
1
guerrero25 wrote:
In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistry of rain in a large area around the city of Manchester, England, noting that the closer one came to town, the more the city air would become increasingly acidic.

A)that the closer one came to town, the more the city air would become increasingly acidic
B)that the city air became increasingly acidic the closer one came to town
C)that coming closer to town, the city air became increasingly acidic
D)that the more the city air became increasingly acidic, the closer one was to town
E)the city air becoming increasingly acidic as one would come closer to town

OA to follow


we all are farmiliar with the idiom in which two adjectives of comparision appear at the begining of the clauses
the better, the more
the better..., the faster...

by offering OA as choice B, gmat want to declare that, we do not need the two adjective are at the beginning and the clause showing first action can appear after the clause showing the result action.

that is what I think. we have to learn a new pattern of sentence
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4489
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 May 2017, 10:21
1
bubblehead0922 wrote:
Dear mikemcgarry,

I was really confused with this question. The correct choice B looks very weird for me. Since I could find some fatal mistakes in all of the other four choices, I have to accept B. But I still have some concerns with B.

As in A, C,D, the correlation is described as " the closer one came to town (event A), the more the city air became acidic (event B)". Does this structure hint any logical direction between the event A and B? Does choice B, the city air became increasingly acidic (event B) the closer one came to town (event A), convey a different logical meaning?

Thx for your time in advance,
Victoria

bubblehead0922
Dear Victoria

I'm happy to respond. :-)

The order in which we state things doesn't matter. It is true that, in the sequence of time, cause precedes effect, but that does not impose a grammatical requirement that cause be stated before effect. It is still obvious what is cause and what is effect.
In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistry of rain in a large area around the city of Manchester, England, noting that the city air became increasingly acidic the closer one came to town.
This is a somewhat sophisticated version that departs from the most simplistic and obvious wording. One of the distinguishing marks of sophisticated writing is to say the ordinary in way that is a shade different from the ordinary way of saying it. There's a good deal of sophisticated writing in the text of official SC questions.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Current Student
avatar
P
Joined: 17 Jun 2016
Posts: 507
Location: India
GMAT 1: 720 Q49 V39
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V37
GPA: 3.65
WE: Engineering (Energy and Utilities)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Jun 2017, 03:39
mikemcgarry wrote:
anujkhatiwada wrote:
Mike doesn't choice B have the "the..the" idiom where i changed the font color, or am i misinterpreting your explanation?

Dear anujkhatiwada,
The way the idiom is constructed, in each branch, the comparative word must immediately follow the word "the" ---- "the closer", "the more", etc. The word "city" is not a comparative word.

The more I think about this, the more I think this is not a question up to GMAT standards. Above I chose (A), but now I think that "more ... increasingly acidic" is redundant, and thus, no answer choice correctly phrases this. I think the correct phrasing would be
that the closer one came to town, the more acidic the city air became
Notice the two comparative structures that immediately follow the word "the" in each branch. That's the ideal, and no choice really comes acceptably close to that.

Mike :-)



Hi mikemcgarry,

I rejected option B because I thought that a comma is must (as you also used a comma in your explanation)...
Can such structures be rendered correct without the use of comma ...

For e.g. :
the more I practice SC, the better I feel about it...

If you see, we by default use a comma all such structures ....

Can please throw some light on this ...
_________________

Compilation of Blogs by Mike Mcgarry - Magoosh

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 28 Dec 2011
Posts: 4489
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jun 2017, 13:46
mihir0710 wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry[/url],

I rejected option B because I thought that a comma is must (as you also used a comma in your explanation)...
Can such structures be rendered correct without the use of comma ...

For e.g. :
the more I practice SC, the better I feel about it...

If you see, we by default use a comma all such structures ....

Can please throw some light on this ...

Dear mihir0710,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

If I may give you feedback on what you have written:
" . . . I thought that a comma is must . . . "
That''s very awkward and hard for a native speaker to understand. By contrast, consider this:
" . . . I thought that a comma is a must . . . "
That sounds natural and makes perfect sense. That one indefinite article makes all the difference.

In this structure, there is some natural variation. The most rigid form of the idiom is
the [comparative][clause #1], the [comparative][clause #2]
That strict version indeed requires a comma.

The OA in this question employed a looser form of the idiom
. . . the city air became increasingly acidic the closer one came to town . . .
Here, the comparative in the first close is not isolated at the beginning; instead, it is integrated into the clause. This variant does not require a comma, and in fact, a comma would be awkward and wrong.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4569
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jun 2017, 05:30
1
Top Contributor
1
The point to note is that 'more and increasingly acidic' are redundant. Hence, remove A and D. Remove C for saying that the city air came closer to town. Drop E for missing the connector 'that' in a reported speech. B remains.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 26 Mar 2017
Posts: 122
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 Jun 2017, 02:35
1
In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistry of rain in a large area around the city of Manchester, England, noting that the closer one came to town, the more the city air would become increasingly acidic.

A) that the closer one came to town, the more the city air would become increasingly acidic
B) that the city air became increasingly acidic the closer one came to town
C) that coming closer to town, the city air became increasingly acidic
D) that the more the city air became increasingly acidic, the closer one was to town
E) the city air becoming increasingly acidic as one would come closer to town


straight B
_________________

I hate long and complicated explanations!

Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 27 Dec 2016
Posts: 237
Concentration: Marketing, Social Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.65
WE: Marketing (Education)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Nov 2017, 03:24
guerrero25 wrote:
In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistry of rain in a large area around the city of Manchester, England, noting that the closer one came to town, the more the city air would become increasingly acidic.

A) that the closer one came to town, the more the city air would become increasingly acidic
B) that the city air became increasingly acidic the closer one came to town
C) that coming closer to town, the city air became increasingly acidic
D) that the more the city air became increasingly acidic, the closer one was to town
E) the city air becoming increasingly acidic as one would come closer to town

OA to follow


Dear all, I have a different reason why we must eliminate [A] in the first place.
The meaning in [A] is illogical : how can the quality of city air is affected by the distance of someone?

That's why I chose between B and D here.
Now, choice B seems bad because the construction would be much better if we put a comma before "the closer one".
I chose D, while I admit that "more" and "increasingly" are redundant.

Dear GMATNinja, sayantanc2k, any idea about construction in B?

Thanks!
_________________

There's an app for that - Steve Jobs.

GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2151
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Nov 2017, 16:14
2
septwibowo wrote:

Dear all, I have a different reason why we must eliminate [A] in the first place.
The meaning in [A] is illogical : how can the quality of city air is affected by the distance of someone?

That's why I chose between B and D here.
Now, choice B seems bad because the construction would be much better if we put a comma before "the closer one".
I chose D, while I admit that "more" and "increasingly" are redundant.

Dear GMATNinja, sayantanc2k, any idea about construction in B?

Thanks!

Check out @mikemcgarry's excellent post above for an explanation of the idiom used in this question: https://gmatclub.com/forum/in-1852-robe ... l#p1868477. If that doesn't do the trick, feel free to follow up, and I'll try take a shot at it.

The bigger picture, though, is that the GMAT really doesn't test the nuances of comma usage, but it does test redundancy. In general, if you think than an answer choice is wrong solely because of a comma... well, it probably isn't wrong JUST because of that comma. Redundancy is a much more severe crime, especially when it's as blatant as in (D).
_________________

GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 04 Jun 2018
Posts: 87
CAT Tests
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Oct 2018, 02:45
guerrero25 wrote:
In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistry of rain in a large area around the city of Manchester, England, noting that the closer one came to town, the more the city air would become increasingly acidic.

(A) that the closer one came to town, the more the city air would become increasingly acidic

(B) that the city air became increasingly acidic the closer one came to town

(C) that coming closer to town, the city air became increasingly acidic

(D) that the more the city air became increasingly acidic, the closer one was to town

(E) the city air becoming increasingly acidic as one would come closer to town

Environment 94/95 - Page 152

https://books.google.com.my/books?isbn=1561342742
John L. Allen - 1994 - ‎Snippet view

In the mid 1800s, many features of acid rain were discovered and detailed by Robert Angus Smith, who was a chemist and Britain’s first Alkali Inspector, or public official who monitored pollution. In 1852, Smith published a detailed report of the chemistry of rain in the city of Manchester and noted that the city air became increasingly acidic the closer one came to town. He also noted that sulfuric acid in the air caused textiles to fade and metals to corrode.









Can some expert throw some light on the usage of would in the option.
According to me, would is used either to show some uncertainity ot some action from the past to the present.
In this case since this is a record which was valid in the past, I feel the usage of would is incorrect.
Am I correct in my reasoning?

VeritasKarishma
chetan2u
GMATNinja
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor
User avatar
P
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 8683
Location: Pune, India
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Oct 2018, 05:21
nitesh50 wrote:
guerrero25 wrote:
In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistry of rain in a large area around the city of Manchester, England, noting that the closer one came to town, the more the city air would become increasingly acidic.

(A) that the closer one came to town, the more the city air would become increasingly acidic

(B) that the city air became increasingly acidic the closer one came to town

(C) that coming closer to town, the city air became increasingly acidic

(D) that the more the city air became increasingly acidic, the closer one was to town

(E) the city air becoming increasingly acidic as one would come closer to town

Environment 94/95 - Page 152

https://books.google.com.my/books?isbn=1561342742
John L. Allen - 1994 - ‎Snippet view

In the mid 1800s, many features of acid rain were discovered and detailed by Robert Angus Smith, who was a chemist and Britain’s first Alkali Inspector, or public official who monitored pollution. In 1852, Smith published a detailed report of the chemistry of rain in the city of Manchester and noted that the city air became increasingly acidic the closer one came to town. He also noted that sulfuric acid in the air caused textiles to fade and metals to corrode.









Can some expert throw some light on the usage of would in the option.
According to me, would is used either to show some uncertainity ot some action from the past to the present.
In this case since this is a record which was valid in the past, I feel the usage of would is incorrect.
Am I correct in my reasoning?

VeritasKarishma
chetan2u
GMATNinja


Yes, I don't like the use of "would" here. "would" is used to preserve the future aspect in the past.
The way the sentence is structured, it is all in the past.
... published... noting that the closer one came to town, the more acidic the city air became...
We don't need the future aspect here.
_________________

Karishma
Veritas Prep GMAT Instructor

Learn more about how Veritas Prep can help you achieve a great GMAT score by checking out their GMAT Prep Options >

GMAT Club Bot
Re: In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr &nbs [#permalink] 26 Oct 2018, 05:21

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 31 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

In 1852 Robert Angus Smith published a detailed report of the chemistr

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.