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In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y,

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In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y,  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2015, 03:08
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In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y, the dividend is z, and remainder is r. Is x > y?

(1) z = 151

(2) r = 11



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In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y,  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2015, 03:30
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Bunuel wrote:
In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y, the dividend is z, and remainder is r. Is x > y?

(1) z = 151

(2) r = 11



Kudos for a correct solution.


We can write this task in such way:
\(z = x*y + r\)

1) we know only \(z\) and this is insufficient.
2) we know only \(r\) and this is insufficient

1+2) \(151 = x*y + 11\)
This is looks like insufficient, but we know that \(x\) and \(y\) should be integer and remainder should be less than divisor: \(x>11\).
And from this information we can infer that \(x*y = 151-11 = 140\)
and as \(x\) should be more than 11, the least possible number is 14 and \(y\) should be equal to 10
So \(x > y\) and answer is C
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Re: In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y,  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2015, 20:30
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Bunuel wrote:
In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y, the dividend is z, and remainder is r. Is x > y?

(1) z = 151

(2) r = 11



Kudos for a correct solution.


z=xy+r

(1) z = 151
Insufficient.
(2) r = 11
Insufficient.

x*y= 140
x>11
so minimum 'x' is 14 and maximum 'y' is '10' .

Answer C .
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Re: In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y,  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Apr 2015, 07:31
1
Hi,
IMO it should be C. that is after combining both statements.
St 1) just be talking about z-151 nothing comes out.
151/2 or 151/150. so remainder being same still x and y cant be quantified.

st 2) r = 11.
still nothing comes out

combining both:
find the number which when divides 151 leaves remainder of 11
x should be 14 and y be 10.

Though while solving I assigned x as 140 / 28 too.. which leaves remainder of 11 when divided by 151
hence C
Regards
Celestial


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Bunuel wrote:
In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y, the dividend is z, and remainder is r. Is x > y?

(1) z = 151

(2) r = 11



Kudos for a correct solution.
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Re: In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y,  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Apr 2015, 03:10
Bunuel wrote:
In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y, the dividend is z, and remainder is r. Is x > y?

(1) z = 151

(2) r = 11



Kudos for a correct solution.


VERITAS PREP OFFICIAL SOLUTION:

Quick hypothetical situations should prove statement 1 to be insufficient. If x is 151, then you'd be dividing the same thing by itself and y would be 1 with no remainder, and x would be much larger than y. But you could flip that and make x = 1, in which you'd just be dividing 151 by 1 and the quotient (y) would be 151, much larger than x.

Recognizing the algebra of division can be quite helpful here, too. Since Quotient = Dividend * Divisor + Remainder, just knowing statement 1 tells you that 151 = xy + r, and clearly that's not enough information to solve.

Statement 2 is also insufficient. Keep in mind here that, without knowing statement 1, you essentially just have an undefined problem with a remainder of 11. Algebraically that's:

z = xy + 11

And clearly not enough information to solve.

But taken together, the information is sufficient. Why, if it still leaves two variables?

151 = xy + 11, so:

140 = xy

The other crucial element of this being a division problem is that the divisor can't be less than the remainder! If you're dividing 151 by, say, 7, you'd never have 11 left over. Even though 7 * 20 = 140, you wouldn't stop there and say that the remainder is 11, because 11 can still divide one more time by 7 (making it 21, remainder 4). So since 140 = xy AND x > 11, there's no way for an integer y to be greater than x. Therefore the two statements together are sufficient.
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PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

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Re: In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y,  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2016, 07:25
Bunuel wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y, the dividend is z, and remainder is r. Is x > y?

(1) z = 151

(2) r = 11



Kudos for a correct solution.


VERITAS PREP OFFICIAL SOLUTION:

Quick hypothetical situations should prove statement 1 to be insufficient. If x is 151, then you'd be dividing the same thing by itself and y would be 1 with no remainder, and x would be much larger than y. But you could flip that and make x = 1, in which you'd just be dividing 151 by 1 and the quotient (y) would be 151, much larger than x.

Recognizing the algebra of division can be quite helpful here, too. Since Quotient = Dividend * Divisor + Remainder, just knowing statement 1 tells you that 151 = xy + r, and clearly that's not enough information to solve.

Statement 2 is also insufficient. Keep in mind here that, without knowing statement 1, you essentially just have an undefined problem with a remainder of 11. Algebraically that's:

z = xy + 11

And clearly not enough information to solve.

But taken together, the information is sufficient. Why, if it still leaves two variables?

151 = xy + 11, so:

140 = xy

The other crucial element of this being a division problem is that the divisor can't be less than the remainder! If you're dividing 151 by, say, 7, you'd never have 11 left over. Even though 7 * 20 = 140, you wouldn't stop there and say that the remainder is 11, because 11 can still divide one more time by 7 (making it 21, remainder 4). So since 140 = xy AND x > 11, there's no way for an integer y to be greater than x. Therefore the two statements together are sufficient.



Typo:
Should be
Dividend=Divisor*Quotient + Remainder
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In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is...  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2016, 13:55
In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y, the dividend is z, and remainder is r. Is x > y?

(1) z = 151
(2) r = 11
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Re: In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y,  [#permalink]

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Re: In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y,  [#permalink]

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Re: In an integer division operation, the divisor is x, the quotient is y, &nbs [#permalink] 13 Apr 2018, 06:10
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