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In theory, international civil servants at the United

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In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 11 Sep 2013, 22:36
4
35
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A
B
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D
E

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  15% (low)

Question Stats:

80% (01:09) correct 20% (01:10) wrong based on 445 sessions

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In theory, international civil servants at the United Nations are prohibited from continuing to draw salaries from their own governments; in practice, however, some governments merely substitute living allowances for their employee's paychecks, assigned by them to the United Nations.

(A) for their employee's paychecks, assigned by them
(B) for the paychecks of their employees who have been assigned
(C) for the paychecks of their employees, having been assigned
(D) in place of their employee's paychecks, for those of them assigned
(E) in place of the paychecks of their employees to have been assigned by them

Originally posted by jyotsnasarabu on 28 Nov 2006, 12:33.
Last edited by fameatop on 11 Sep 2013, 22:36, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2006, 14:36
421. In theory, international civil servants at the United Nations are prohibited from continuing to draw salaries from their own governments; in practice, however, some governments merely substitute living allowances for their employees’ paychecks, assigned by them to the United Nations.
(A) for their employees’ paychecks, assigned by them
(B) for the paychecks of their employees who have been assigned
(C) for the paychecks of their employees, having been assigned
(D) in place of their employees’ paychecks, for those of them assigned
(E) in place of the paychecks of their employees to have been assigned by them
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jun 2010, 01:09
1
Well first off, this is something that does happen on the GMAT. We've all been taught that "have been" and other forms of "to be" contribute to a wordy/awkward sentence structure, BUT when you are given 5 choices, never think about what would have been MORE correct, simply choose the best choice. Introducing a sixth choice may seem like you are thinking of how you could have corrected the sentence even better, but in fact this is dangerous on the GMAT as it prevents you from focusing on the issue of simply choosing the best choice. So put on your GMAT blinders and stick to the 5 :)

A. Misplaced modifier - this changes the meaning by suggesting that the paychecks were assigned to the UN.

B. This correctly modifies the employees, and perfect tense is actually appropriate. The rest of the sentence talks of the present, but the "assigning" happened before, so present perfect correctly conveys this.

C. Having been is a big no no if you have a better choice. Make sure you eliminate all other choices before you ever pick a sentence containing "having been".

D. in place of, is rather unidiomatic. And the "them" is ambiguous.

E. to have been assigned by them, this is grammatically incorrect and changes the meaning.

B is the best choice.

As for your sixth, this could be correct too, since it could mean something general. But remember this path of finding a sixth choice can be dangerous. Good luck!
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2011, 07:45
Just needed some clarity on a rule (if its correct) :

The modifier "verb-ing" always modifies the SUBJECT of the sentence :

[b]The batter hit the ball out of the baseball park, using all his might.


Here even though the noun "baseball park" is closer, this type of modifier takes the SUBJECT.
[/b]


Is the explanation in bold correct?
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2011, 07:51
1
ing is the most powerful modifier. It modifies the whole clause. NOT just the one it touches.

deepaksharma1986 wrote:
Just needed some clarity on a rule (if its correct) :

The modifier "verb-ing" always modifies the SUBJECT of the sentence :

[b]The batter hit the ball out of the baseball park, using all his might.


Here even though the noun "baseball park" is closer, this type of modifier takes the SUBJECT.
[/b]


Is the explanation in bold correct?
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2014, 10:49
1
From OG

Logical predication; Rhetorical construction

It is difficult to tell which parts of this sentence go together because of errors and confusion in the underlined portion. Living allowances is the counterpart of paychecks, so it is better to say governments . . . substitute living allowances for the paychecks of their employees because it makes the substitution clearer. This change also makes it easier to correct the modification error that appears in the phrase assigned by them, which incorrectly modifies paychecks rather than employees. Th e modifying clause who have been assigned clearly describes employees and fits into the remaining part of the sentence, to the United Nations.

A Assigned by them incorrectly and illogically modifies paychecks.
B Correct. In this sentence, the meaning is clearer, because paychecks is separated from employees. The relative clause clearly modifies employees.
C Having been assigned illogically modifies governments.
D The correct construction is substitutes x for y, not substitutes x in place of y. The construction following paychecks is wordy and awkward.
E The correct construction is substitutes x for y, not substitutes x in place of y. The construction following employees is wordy and awkward.
The correct answer is B.

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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2014, 03:12
2
gmat1220 wrote:
ing is the most powerful modifier. It modifies the whole clause. NOT just the one it touches.

deepaksharma1986 wrote:
Just needed some clarity on a rule (if its correct) :

The modifier "verb-ing" always modifies the SUBJECT of the sentence :

[b]The batter hit the ball out of the baseball park, using all his might.


Here even though the noun "baseball park" is closer, this type of modifier takes the SUBJECT.
[/b]


Is the explanation in bold correct?


ing is a versatile modifier when comma + ing is used it modifes the clause when there is no comma it modifies the Noun. Hope it is clear.
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2016, 13:30
Hi!
Calling all experts for explaining the difference between B & D.
one diffidence is Idiom usage.. any other difference please ?

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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2016, 07:49
SPLIT 1) "SUBSTITUE X FOR Y" IS THE CORRECT USAGE. D AND E ARE OUT.

SPLIT2) "ASSIGNED" MODIFIES PAYCHECKS IN A, THIS IS THE WRONG MEANING. A IS OUT.

SPLIT3) "HAVING BEEN" IS STRANGE AND USED AS LAST RESORT IF THERE IS NO OTHER OPTION. C IS OUT.
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2016, 15:33
Celestial09 wrote:
Hi!
Calling all experts for explaining the difference between B & D.
one diffidence is Idiom usage.. any other difference please ?

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Apart from idiomatic error, 2nd thing issue I see is "employees' paychecks, for those of them assigned".
What does those/them refer to. Not clear.
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2017, 21:34
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In theory, international civil servants at the United Nations are prohibited from continuing to draw salaries from their own governments; in practice, however, some governments merely substitute living allowances for their employee's paychecks, assigned by them to the United Nations.

(A) for their employee's paychecks, assigned by them - Modifier assigned by them illogically modifies paychecks ; Pronoun them refers to government and means that paychecks are assigned to the United Nations
(B) for the paychecks of their employees who have been assigned - Correct
(C) for the paychecks of their employees, having been assigned - having been assigned refers to subject government and is illogical
(D) in place of their employee's paychecks, for those of them assigned - substitute and in place of redundant - Idiom error ; for those of them is ambiguous
(E) in place of the paychecks of their employees to have been assigned by them - substitute and in place of redundant - Idiom error ; Wordy

Answer B
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2017, 09:32
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In theory, international civil servants at the United Nations are prohibited from continuing to draw salaries from their own governments; in practice, however, some governments merely substitute living allowances for their employee's paychecks, assigned by them to the United Nations.

Issue: Construction | Idiom

Analysis:
1. In the non-underlined part we see usage of "substitute X". Based on the construction and options of this sentence, we need to go with idiomatic "substitute X for Y" ("substitute X in place of Y" is incorrect)
2. As for the meaning of the sentence, it should properly convey two thoughts in underlined part: (a) the paychecks have been substituted with living allowances (b) employees are the ones assigned to the UN.


(A) for their employee's paychecks, assigned by them
- "assigned by them" incorrectly modifies "paychecks"

(B) for the paychecks of their employees who have been assigned

(C) for the paychecks of their employees, having been assigned
- "having been assigned" does not correctly modify "employees"

(D) in place of their employee's paychecks, for those of them assigned
- "in place" is redundant. Correct idiom is "substitute X for Y"

(E) in place of the paychecks of their employees to have been assigned by them
- "in place" is redundant. Correct idiom is "substitute X for Y"

Answer: (B)
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2017, 17:02
In theory, international civil servants at the United Nations are prohibited from continuing to draw salaries from their own governments; in practice, however, some governments merely substitute living allowances for their employee's paychecks, assigned by them to the United Nations.

(A) for their employee's paychecks, assigned by them (who is them referring to,we have pronoun ambiguity here)
(B) for the paychecks of their employees who have been assigned Correct answer with clear reference and correct meaning.
(C) for the paychecks of their employees, having been assigned (having been assigned is wrongly used.)
(D) in place of their employee's paychecks, for those of them assigned(those is pronoun ambiguity,it can be referring to civil servants or the paychecks)
(E) in place of the paychecks of their employees to have been assigned by them (to have been is incorrect)
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Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2018, 09:30
Dear Team

" ; in practice, however, some governments merely substitute living allowances for their employee's paychecks, assigned by them to the United Nations. "

clauses separated by comma be independent, shouldn't this be incorrect above as however will make it ambiguous ?

Please help.
Re: In theory, international civil servants at the United &nbs [#permalink] 24 Aug 2018, 09:30
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