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Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing

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Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 06 Jan 2019, 02:51
14
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

37% (01:03) correct 63% (01:10) wrong based on 528 sessions

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Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing bond yields to the dividends available on common stocks.


(A) between bonds and stocks on comparing bond yields to

(B) among bonds and stocks on comparisons of bond yields to

(C) between bonds and stocks on comparisons of bond yields with

(D) among bonds and stocks on comparing bond yields and

(E) between bonds and stocks on comparing bond yields with

Originally posted by WinWinMBA on 20 Jun 2005, 17:00.
Last edited by Bunuel on 06 Jan 2019, 02:51, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2011, 08:23
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Let us not bother whether it is ‘comparison with’ or ‘comparison to’, which I understand is not being tested by GMAT these days. But the primary clue is that a preposition such as ‘on’ has to be followed by a noun or noun phrase. There is no escape from this rule. So it has to be ‘on comparisons of’. Any other expression may be ignored from consideration. So ADE are out. Between B and C, as the comparison is essentially between two things namely bonds and stocks, we have to use ‘between’ rather than ‘among’. Choice C is correct.
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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2005, 09:05
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WinWinMBA wrote:
497. Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing bond yields to the dividends available on common stocks.

(C) between bonds and stocks on comparisons of bond yields with


I'd say (C) for three reasons reasons, three things are tested here.

1) compare with vs compare to (and by extension, comparison with/to)
...Either preposition may be correct, but it depends on usage. Compare with stresses differences, while compare to stresses similarities. Here, we're comparing differences between bond yields and stock dividends, something different enough so as to cause one to choose one investment versus the other.

2) between vs. among.
Here we're comparing two entities, stocks vs. bonds. So between is correct. (If you have any trouble with that, by the way, know that 'tween' comes from the same roots as 'two' and 'twice')

3) comparisons vs. comparing.
Just need a simple noun here to be the object of the preposition "on". Comparing can be a noun, but it sounds awkward here, whereas comparisons is perfect.

(C) gets all these right.
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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2005, 12:42
1
OA is C.

1. 'Compare to' Vs 'Compare with'
'Compare to' is used to compare to unlike things and tell the similarity between
them.
'Compare with' is used to compare two like things and tell the difference between
them.

This narrows choices down to 'C' & 'E'

2. 'Among' Vs 'Between'

'Among' - used when dealign with over 2 things
'Between' - used when dealing with 2 things

This narows choices down to 'A' , 'C', 'E'

Between choices 'C' and 'E', the difference is the usage 'comparing' vs
'comparison'

'comparison' is an act of 'comparing'.
Also note the usage 'based on ....comparisons ...with'
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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Aug 2012, 21:02
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Here is my take on it:

Firstly, according to MGMAT, the GMAT ignores the difference between 'compare to' and 'compare with'. (pg.148 Sentence Correction guide)

Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing bond yields to the dividends available on common stocks.

A between bonds and stocks on comparing bond yields to
seems to imply the choice is based on the act of comparing rather than the comparison itself

B among bonds and stocks on comparisons of bond yields to
incorrect use of 'among'

C between bonds and stocks on comparisons of bond yields with OK
seems kosher: between is correctly used and the choice is based on the outcome of the comparison rather than the on act of comparing.

D among bonds and stocks on comparing bond yields and
incorrect use of 'among'

E between bonds and stocks on comparing bond yields with
seems to imply the choice is based on the act of comparing rather than the comparison itself
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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2016, 06:39
daagh wrote:
Let us not bother whether it is ‘comparison with’ or ‘comparison to’, which I understand is not being tested by GMAT these days. But the primary clue is that a preposition such as ‘on’ has to be followed by a noun or noun phrase. There is no escape from this rule. So it has to be ‘on comparisons of’. Any other expression may be ignored from consideration. So ADE are out. Between B and C, as the comparison is essentially between two things namely bonds and stocks, we have to use ‘between’ rather than ‘among’. Choice C is correct.


I have a different idea
on arriving the hotel, I study gmat immediately

in this sentence, a correct one, on following by doing.

the point in this sentence is that if doing is used as pure noun, and a pure noun exist, specifically coparision, we should you noun form , and do not use doing as pure a noun. honestly, we need to do about gerund, participle and doing as pure noun to understand this question properly. these points are not explained enough in grammar book and in gmat og books and many persons fail.
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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2016, 05:18
thangvietnam wrote:
daagh wrote:
Let us not bother whether it is ‘comparison with’ or ‘comparison to’, which I understand is not being tested by GMAT these days. But the primary clue is that a preposition such as ‘on’ has to be followed by a noun or noun phrase. There is no escape from this rule. So it has to be ‘on comparisons of’. Any other expression may be ignored from consideration. So ADE are out. Between B and C, as the comparison is essentially between two things namely bonds and stocks, we have to use ‘between’ rather than ‘among’. Choice C is correct.


I have a different idea
on arriving the hotel, I study gmat immediately

in this sentence, a correct one, on following by doing.

the point in this sentence is that if doing is used as pure noun, and a pure noun exist, specifically coparision, we should you noun form , and do not use doing as pure a noun. honestly, we need to do about gerund, participle and doing as pure noun to understand this question properly. these points are not explained enough in grammar book and in gmat og books and many persons fail.



thangvietnam With the same reasoning that you have furnished, wouldn't "on arrival" be more appropriate than "on arriving"? This in turn would lead to the same explanation that Daagh provided: the preposition "on" followed by a noun.

whichscore wrote:
thank you for this clear answer.
Can we generalize this rule to all prepositions ?


daagh wrote:
Yes without doubt. A preposition will have to be followed by a noun or noun phrase or a pronoun or a pronoun phrase. There is no exception to this rule, as far as I know. That is the reason,when the word "like" is used as a preposition in comparisons, it is always followed by a noun and not a verb or a clause


However I beg to differ with the opinion that any preposition must be followed by a noun (phrase) or a pronoun (phrase).

After reaching the hotel, I called up John...... is there any error in this sentence?

The preposition "after" is followed by a gerund - the same structure as that in A,D and E. daagh Sir, kindly correct me, if I am making any mistake.
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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2016, 18:38
Could someone clarify "comparisons" vs "comparing" ??

comparisons is a noun, whereas comparing is a verb. In the given context, I think comparing is correct. What is it I'm missing. Can someone please fill me?
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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2016, 08:26
manhasnoname wrote:
Could someone clarify "comparisons" vs "comparing" ??

comparisons is a noun, whereas comparing is a verb. In the given context, I think comparing is correct. What is it I'm missing. Can someone please fill me?


Th correct usage is:
base on + (noun).

My conclusion is based on my observation.... correct.

"Comparing" here is also a noun - a gerund ( not a verb as you mentioned) - but when available, a concrete noun is preferred to a gerund.

My conclusion is based on my observing ... wrong.
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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2018, 04:40
GMATNinja , daagh , AjiteshArun , gmatexam439

Please elaborate the POE for A and E . B and D are very easy to eliminate.

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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2018, 06:00
1
Prateek176

Not an expert but let me try this one.

Between is used when there are 2 entities and among when there are more than 2 entities. Hence, bonds and stocks require between

So B & D is gone

Now see the bold part and remove the fluff.

Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on on comparisons of bond yields to the dividends available on common stocks.
So as highlighted above "on" is a preposition and thus require a noun, so comparison should be used instead of ing form comparing.

OA E

Hope it helps.




Prateek176 wrote:
GMATNinja , daagh , AjiteshArun , gmatexam439

Please elaborate the POE for A and E . B and D are very easy to eliminate.

Regards
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Re: Many investors base their choice between bonds and stocks on comparing   [#permalink] 17 Aug 2018, 06:00
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