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Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2013, 01:32
A)well known as much because of having an eccentirc personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
B) well known as much for having an eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures
C)well known as much because of her eccentric personality as she was for her skillful wax renderings of poular public figure
D)as well known for having an eccentric personality as having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
E) as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.

Only E has a parallel structure with the idiom as well .. as therefore I would go with E

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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HarishLearner wrote:
I thought "became as well known...." was wrong idiomatic construction...hmmmm

Dear HarishLearner,
This is correct in a comparison.
It's fine to say ...
P became well known.
We could add either a role or an activity
P became well known for her poetry.
P became well known as a baseball pitcher.
Those are all the correct idioms when talking about one person.

Now, when we introduce a comparison, we need the extra "as" ----
P became as well known as Q.
We would tend not to use another "as" preposition in the middle of the "as well known as" construction, because that would be too awkward and confusing, but we could us a "for" preposition ---- and the comparison could be between two people or two activities ----
Clemens became as well known for his steroid controversy as did Bonds. (comparison of people)
Dr. Schweitzer become as well known for musicology as for his humanitarian efforts. (comparison of activities)

Here's a blog about the Idioms of Comparison:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idioms-of-comparison/

Here's a free idiom ebook:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idiom-ebook/

I hope all this helps.
Mike :-)
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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2013, 10:59
ayushman wrote:
D changes the meaning.

Patience Lovell Wright became well known for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.

This could mean she just "had" skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax. The point is that those skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax were actually "her's".

Dear ayushman,
I agree something is ambiguous in the wording, but we don't have to read it in a way that changes the meaning. You were interpreting the gerund, the object of the preposition "for", as "having", and then "skillfully rendered popular public figures" is what she had. Indeed, that interpretation does change the meaning.
Instead, I would argue that the gerund is "having ... rendered" ---- this is the gerund form of the perfect participle. In other words, she was the creator of the "popular public figures." Other examples
...famous for having written a novel ...
...famous for having spoken to Edison...
...famous for having sailed around the world ...

Given multiple possibilities, we really have to choose the one that doesn't change the meaning.
Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jan 2014, 10:12
idinuv wrote:
Request the experts to post POE for this question.


Patience Lovell Wright, whose traveling waxworks exhibit preceded Madame Tussuad's work by 30 years, became well known as much because of having an eccentric personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.

A)well known as much because of having an eccentric personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
having is a participle modifier, while rendered is a verb. Parallelism not maintained.
B) well known as much for having an eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures
having is a participle modifier, while 'wax renderings' is a noun phrase. Not parallel.
C)well known as much because of her eccentric personality as she was for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figure
'because of her eccentric personality' is a adverb clause (Dependant), while 'she was for her skillful ...' is not a clause at all (no verb)
D)as well known for having an eccentric personality as having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
'having' is a participle modifier while 'having rendered' is a verb. Parallelism not maintained.
E) as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.
'noun phrase' is parallel to 'noun phrase'
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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose traveling waxworks exhibit [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2014, 23:35
daagh wrote:
The given text is a test of symmetrical //ism in a two part sentence. This is not testing the correctness of either 'became well known' or 'became as well known'. Both are correct in their own right in appropriate contexts.


(A) well known ‘as much because of having an eccentric personality ‘as for having’ ------- un//.
as well known for her eccentric[/color]’ personality ‘as for her skillful wax renderings’ of popular public figures. …… // correct choice


(B) well known ‘as much for having an eccentric personality’ ‘as for skillful wax renderings’ of popular public figure. …..un//

(C) well known ‘as much because of her’ eccentric personality ‘as she was for’ her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures. …..un//

(D) as well known ‘for having an eccentric’ personality ‘as having skillfully’ rendered popular public figures in wax. ----- un//

(E)’as well known for her eccentric’ personality ‘as for her skillful wax renderings’ of popular public figures. …… // correct choice


Quote:
Also for me B is looking good because as much ......as is idiomatically correct...and the phrases following as much and as are also parallel...


Nope; B flouts the //ism by missing something similar to ‘having’ in the second arm



Hi Daagh,

I have a small doubt. In option E, the adjective known is ellipsed in the second half of the sentence.
Option E is same as :

as well known for her eccentric personality as known for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.

Please let me know if my understanding is coorect.

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2015, 05:26
Can I request some expert to explain this question? The OA is "E" which uses the structure "as X as Y", but is no way we have parallel component in the place of "X" and "Y". If we break it into two separate sentence without the parallel element "as...as...", then the two sentences doesn't stand correct separately. On the other hand the option "B" has "as much X as Y" structure and the two sides of parallel element are parallel in construction. The option B stands correct if we break the sentence in two separate sentence. Please suggest. Any response is appreciated.

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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crazykaushik wrote:
Can I request some expert to explain this question? The OA is "E" which uses the structure "as X as Y", but is no way we have parallel component in the place of "X" and "Y". If we break it into two separate sentence without the parallel element "as...as...", then the two sentences doesn't stand correct separately. On the other hand the option "B" has "as much X as Y" structure and the two sides of parallel element are parallel in construction. The option B stands correct if we break the sentence in two separate sentence. Please suggest. Any response is appreciated.

Dear crazykaushik,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

What you are asking touches on the very tricky idea of dropping common words in parallel. See this blog article:
https://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/dropping- ... -the-gmat/

Here's version (E):
Patience Lowell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Madame Tussaud's work by 30 years, became as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.
Here' the parallelism with the omitted words:
Patience Lowell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Madame Tussaud's work by 30 years, became
//as well known for her eccentric personality
//as [well known] for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.
You see, the second occurrence of "well known" is implied, but if we actually stated it, the sentence would sound awkward and redundant.

The GMAT loves this grammatical structure, because if you don't recognize what's missing, the sentence will look wrong. It's all about being mindful of what's not there!

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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crazykaushik wrote:
Can I request some expert to explain this question? The OA is "E" which uses the structure "as X as Y", but is no way we have parallel component in the place of "X" and "Y". If we break it into two separate sentence without the parallel element "as...as...", then the two sentences doesn't stand correct separately. On the other hand the option "B" has "as much X as Y" structure and the two sides of parallel element are parallel in construction. The option B stands correct if we break the sentence in two separate sentence. Please suggest. Any response is appreciated.



h Kaushik,

firstly lets see why B is wrong..
B) well known as much for having an eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures
if you look at the two phrases in red, they are not parallel... her skillful wax renderings is noun phrase whereas having an eccentric personality is present participle phrase...

now lets look at E..
E) as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.
here both the phrases are noun phrase and follow proper parallelism
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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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crazykaushik wrote:
Can I request some expert to explain this question? The OA is "E" which uses the structure "as X as Y", but is no way we have parallel component in the place of "X" and "Y". If we break it into two separate sentence without the parallel element "as...as...", then the two sentences doesn't stand correct separately. On the other hand the option "B" has "as much X as Y" structure and the two sides of parallel element are parallel in construction. The option B stands correct if we break the sentence in two separate sentence. Please suggest. Any response is appreciated.

Hi Kaushik, would you say:

(i) He was as good in cricket as in football (structure of option E).

Or would you say:

(ii) He was good as much in cricket as in football (structure of option B).

Hopefully in this simplified version, it is easy to see that (i) is correct. Hence, option E is correct.
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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2015, 19:43
Clearly E,

Choice B is not parallel. ...having (simple gerund)... is NEVER parallel to ... renderings of (complex gerund)
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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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Shreks1190 wrote:
Doesn't E change the meaning?
Are we trying to explain why A is as popular as B or are we trying to find out reasons for popularity of A?? Experts please help :!:

Dear Shreks1190,
I'm happy to respond. :-) Choice (E) does NOT change the meaning. Here's the question again:

Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Madame Tussaud's work by 30 years, became well known as much because of having an eccentric personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
A) well known as much because of having an eccentric personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
B) well known as much for having an eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures
C) well known as much because of her eccentric personality as she was for her skillful wax renderings of poular public figure
D) as well known for having an eccentric personality as having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
E) as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.


First of all, if it may make a suggestion, if you are using "algebraic" letters to talk about elements of a GMAT SC problem, please avoid the first five letters of the alphabet, to avoid obvious confusion with answer choices. There are 21 other letters in the alphabet available as algebraic symbols.

The intent of the sentence to say that Mr. Wright is equally well-known for both X and Y. It is simultaneously is a statement about why she is famous as well as a comparison of these two different reasons why she is famous. The logical framing device in the prompt is

Patience Lovell Wright ... became well known as much because of X as for Y.

The as much P as Q structure is a standard comparison frame, and the GMAT loves to put phrases & clauses into this. Here, in (A), there are two mismatched preposition---a failure of parallelism, even though the meaning is clear. Among other things, (E) expresses this same meaning with a correct parallel structure.

My friend, I am going to recommend this blog article for you:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/how-to-imp ... bal-score/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2015, 14:20
arj_singh1976 wrote:
Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Madame Tussaud's work by 30 years, became well known as much because of having an eccentirc personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.

A)well known as much because of having an eccentirc personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
B) well known as much for having an eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures
C)well known as much because of her eccentric personality as she was for her skillful wax renderings of poular public figure
D)as well known for having an eccentric personality as having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
E) as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.


Parallelism is the answer!

See the red items above. The second parts of sentences including these red items are not parallel with these items.

However, in E parallelism is observed.

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2015, 10:15
Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Madame Tussaud's work by 30 years, became well known as much because of having an eccentric personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.

To be well known for is idiomatic so eliminate A, and C.
The correct structure is "as well known for X as for Y." E is the only choice that models this.
B) well known as much for having an eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures
D)as well known for having an eccentric personality as having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
E) as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2015, 02:11
why is the part after for not parallel ...

i assume a gerund can be parallel to a noun/pronoun

"eccentric personality" is not parallel with "skillfully rendered"

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jun 2015, 04:16
venkat18290 wrote:
why is the part after for not parallel ...

i assume a gerund can be parallel to a noun/pronoun

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Hi Venkat!

This is indeed a very good question.

You should have known what simple gerunds and complex gerunds are to see why the two items you have mentioned are not parallel.
Manhattan SC book nicely explains this issue. If you need, I can explain them to you too.

Now let's see the original choice B:

B)well known as much for having an eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures

The first element, 'having an eccentric personality', is a simple gerund

The second element, 'her skillful wax renderings ...' , is complex gerund

Simple gerunds and complex gerunds are not structurally parallel.
More generally, we have 3 sets of parallel structures: action nouns and complex gerunds, simple gerunds, concrete nouns
These 3 categories should not be mixed

There are some questions on this issue in OGs; see for example this one http://gmatclub.com/forum/the-baldrick-manufacturing-company-has-for-several-years-129508.html
(The reason why choice C is not correct in this question is because it uses a complex gerund with a simple gerund in a structure that needs two parallel elements.)

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2015, 01:31
arj_singh1976 wrote:
Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Madame Tussaud's work by 30 years, became well known as much because of having an eccentirc personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.

A)well known as much because of having an eccentirc personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
B) well known as much for having an eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures
C)well known as much because of her eccentric personality as she was for her skillful wax renderings of poular public figure
D)as well known for having an eccentric personality as having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
E) as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.





Became as well known for A...as for B seems correct. Eg. Became as good in maths...as in physics. Also structure in both part of idioms is parallel.

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose traveling waxworks exhibit [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2015, 12:00
amitanand wrote:
Hi Experts,
In the following question:

Q:Patience Lovell Wright, whose traveling waxworks exhibit preceded Madame Tuscan’s work by 30 year, became well known as much because of having an eccentric personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.

(A)well known as much because of having an eccentric personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax
(B)well known as much for having an eccentric personality as for skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.
(C)well known as much because of her eccentric personality as she was for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.
(D)as well known for having an eccentric personality as having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
(E)as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.

Could any body explain 'became well known' or 'became as well known' is correct?

Also for me B is looking good because as much ......as is idiomatically correct...and the the phrases following as much and as are also parallel....

Thanks
-Amit



IMO, E does the best job in terms of maintaining the parallel structure.
However, I am little skeptical to believe it's the bet answer because the intent of the original sentence was to say that the Patience Lovell became WELL KNOWN for something and something, whereas E states the Patience Lovell became known for something as well as something.
Both are perfectly sensible. I guess maintaining parallel structure precedes change of meaning perhaps? Is this a sort of a rule of them on the GMAT?

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose traveling waxworks exhibit [#permalink]

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New post 17 Dec 2015, 00:15
Patience Lovell Wright, whose traveling waxworks exhibit preceded Madame Tuscan’s work by 30 year, became well known as much because of having an eccentric personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.

(A)well known as much because of having an eccentric personality as for having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax
(B)well known as much for having an eccentric personality as for skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.
(C)well known as much because of her eccentric personality as she was for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.
(D)as well known for having an eccentric personality as having skillfully rendered popular public figures in wax.
(E)as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.



I think parallelism is NOT the issue in choice A. A is wrong bcos of other reasons.

the phrases: because of having and for having skillfully rendered are actually parallel. 'For' can be used to present reasons - this can be seen in many official questions. A is definitely wordy, but ||ism is not the issue.

I think the main issue in this sentence lies is the usage of the idiom: as [adjective] as

'as much as' or 'as well as' are perfect to use when there is no adjective in the sentence. Whereas, in the current scenario, we already have an adjective : well known. So, there is no point in bringing another.

e.g. Gandhi was famous as much for his truthfulness as because he had a huge public support.
Gandhi was as famous for his truthfulness as because he had a huge public support.

I think the second version is much better and concise too.

Thanks.

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2016, 23:48
hatemnag wrote:
No experts there to place the concept why E is right. I clicked E but i need to master the concept.

The answer to your question is parallelism.

Only option E maintains the parallelism here: as well known for her eccentric personality as for her skillful wax renderings of popular public figures.

Does this help?

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2016, 18:53
OA is E.
(E)as well known for her eccentric personality as [b]for her skillful wax renderings[/b] of popular public figures.

The highlighted portions are parallel to each other. As "X" as "Y"
"

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Re: Patience Lovell Wright, whose travelling waxworks exhibit preceded Mad   [#permalink] 15 Jun 2016, 18:53

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