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quot; The rapid development of India in the twenty-first

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quot; The rapid development of India in the twenty-first  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2012, 23:53
" The rapid development of India in the twenty-first century is like England in the eighteenth century."

I understand that there is an illogical comparison . India's development is not like England. However the correct solution includes "that of England" to imply England's development i.e " The rapid development of India in the twenty-first century is like that of England in the eighteenth century."

Doubt: This, that these and those cannot replace nouns, in this case " development "

can someone please clarify..
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Re: Demonstrative Pronouns  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2012, 07:02
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That has several uses, such as a subordinate conjunction, when it connects a main clause with a sub-clause or as simple pronoun to replace another existing noun {as in this case) or as an adjective when you say -that pen- belongs to me. It is also a restrictive pronoun when it refers to a particular thing in a subordinate clause- (the film that I saw was horrible)

But the use of ‘that’ as demonstrative pronoun nakedly without an accompanying noun is not an acceptable practice in formal writing. This is mostly resorted to in spoken communication, when you have somebody listening to you and you can point out at something physically with your fingers.

Plese visit the link below and you will get to know it better
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/that
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Re: Demonstrative Pronouns  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2012, 01:46
I also figured out that " That " and " Those " can be used to indicate copies of the antecedent. in other words restricting the meaning.

Thanks.
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Re: Demonstrative Pronouns  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Oct 2012, 05:47
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rahulb2011 wrote:
I also figured out that " That " and " Those " can be used to indicate copies of the antecedent. in other words restricting the meaning.

Thanks.


And "those" cannot be used if the new copy is plural while the original is singular.

I can say

My product is better than that of my competitor.

or

My products are better than those of my competitors.

But I cannot say

My product is better than those of my competitors
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Re: quot; The rapid development of India in the twenty-first  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 07:50
rahulb2011 wrote:
" The rapid development of India in the twenty-first century is like England in the eighteenth century."

I understand that there is an illogical comparison . India's development is not like England. However the correct solution includes "that of England" to imply England's development i.e " The rapid development of India in the twenty-first century is like that of England in the eighteenth century."

Doubt: This, that these and those cannot replace nouns, in this case " development "

can someone please clarify..


Would it be correct if we wrote : The rapid development of India in the twenty-first century is like England's in the eighteenth century.
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Re: quot; The rapid development of India in the twenty-first  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 19:18
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kunal1608 wrote:
rahulb2011 wrote:
" The rapid development of India in the twenty-first century is like England in the eighteenth century."

I understand that there is an illogical comparison . India's development is not like England. However the correct solution includes "that of England" to imply England's development i.e " The rapid development of India in the twenty-first century is like that of England in the eighteenth century."

Doubt: This, that these and those cannot replace nouns, in this case " development "

can someone please clarify..


Would it be correct if we wrote : The rapid development of India in the twenty-first century is like England's in the eighteenth century.


The major issue I see is that it is stylistically a poor choice as it doesn't follow the same structure and introduces a little bit of ambiguity as a result (i.e. the reader has to think a bit, "England's.... what? Oh, England's development"). Consider the reverse case, "India's rapid development in the twenty-first century is like that of England in the eighteenth century." It is similarly awkward to what you wrote. Either "India's rapid development in the twenty-first century is like England's in the eighteenth century" or "The rapid development of India in the twenty-first century is like that of England in the eighteenth century." would be a better way to phrase that sentence.

Colloquially speaking though? Not a big deal. Only on the GMAT haha
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Re: quot; The rapid development of India in the twenty-first   [#permalink] 28 Jul 2017, 19:18
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