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Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions

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Re: Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2018, 14:37
Rocket7 wrote:
gmat4varun

That is referring to phenomena. Now Plural of Phenomena is Phenomena and that's why in option B, the use of the plural verb "are" is correct.

mcelroytutoring Could you please confirm if the above reasoning is correct for the use of plural verb are? Appreciate it.


Just searched and found that "Phenomenon" is singular and "Phenomena" is plural. I also had doubt about "that" referent in the question but then used number/count logic, a thing can have different (say, 1,2, 3...) Phenomena....so its plural.
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Re: Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2018, 15:50
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seed wrote:
Rocket7 wrote:
gmat4varun

That is referring to phenomena. Now Plural of Phenomena is Phenomena and that's why in option B, the use of the plural verb "are" is correct.

mcelroytutoring Could you please confirm if the above reasoning is correct for the use of plural verb are? Appreciate it.


Just searched and found that "Phenomenon" is singular and "Phenomena" is plural. I also had doubt about "that" referent in the question but then used number/count logic, a thing can have different (say, 1,2, 3...) Phenomena....so its plural.

Correct: "phenomenon" is singular and "phenomena" is plural. Similar to "criterion" and "criteria," as well as "medium" and "media."

"Something like a phenomenon..."

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Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 07 May 2019, 12:14
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Hello Everyone!

Let's take a closer look at this question to see where we can narrow down wrong options to get to the correct answer quickly! To get started, here is the original question with major differences between each option highlighted in orange:

Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions, including those deemed personal or private is a social phenomenon, though one inseparable from bodily response.

(A) private is a social phenomenon, though one inseparable
(B) private, are social phenomena that are inseparable
(C) private are a social phenomenon but are not those inseparable
(D) private—are social phenomena but not separable
(E) also as private emotions, are social phenomena not inseparable

After a quick glance over the options, a few key differences pop out right away:

1. What to do after the word "emotions"
2. What to do after the word "phenomenon/phenomena"


Let's get started with #1 on our list: what to do after the word "emotions." It's clear from the original sentence that the phrase, "including those deemed personal or private" is a MODIFIER that is also acting as a non-essential clause. It is giving us more information about the word "emotions," but doesn't NEED to be in the sentence.

Whenever we deal with non-essential clauses or modifiers, they MUST be offset from the rest of the sentence somehow.You can do this by either putting commas before and after it, dashes before and after it, or put it inside parentheses. To make this easier to spot, I'm going to include the entire sentence with the different options added in. Let's see which sentences handle this non-essential clause correctly or not:

(A) Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions, including those deemed personal or private is a social
phenomenon, though one inseparable from bodily response.


This option is INCORRECT for a few reasons. First, the phrase "including those deemed personal or private" isn't offset on both sides with commas. Second, the singular verb "is" doesn't match up to its plural subject "emotions."

(B) Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions, including those deemed personal or private, are social
phenomena that are inseparable from bodily response.


This option is CORRECT! It puts commas on both sides of the phrase to tell readers this is non-essential information! If you remove the non-essential clause, the rest of the sentence makes perfect sense without it!

(C) Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions, including those deemed personal or private are a social phenomenon but are not those inseparable from bodily response.

This option is INCORRECT because it doesn't have commas on both sides of the non-essential phrase "including those deemed personal or private." There's also a problem with the word "those" later on in the sentence. It's not clear if "those" is referring to emotions or phenomenon. When a pronoun is too vague, it's likely an incorrect choice.

(D) Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions, including those deemed personal or private—are social phenomena but not separable from bodily response.

This option is also INCORRECT. Remember when I said you can offset non-essential clauses with commas, dashes, or parentheses? You can only use ONE method for each clause, and this sentence uses two (comma and dash).

(E) Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions, including those deemed personal or also as private emotions, are social phenomena not inseparable from bodily response.

This option is INCORRECT, though not because of punctuation. Yes, it properly utilizes commas on both sides of the non-essential phrase. However, the non-essential phrase is overly wordy. Why say "also as private emotions" when simply saying "private" will do? We also have a problem with the phrase "not inseparable" changing the intended meaning. This changes the meaning of the sentence from "emotions are inseparable from bodily response" to "emotions are not inseparable from bodily response."

There you have it! Option B is the correct answer because it uses correct punctuation with non-essential modifiers and doesn't confuse readers to the intended meaning.



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Originally posted by EMPOWERgmatVerbal on 27 Aug 2018, 17:56.
Last edited by EMPOWERgmatVerbal on 07 May 2019, 12:14, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2018, 10:21
hi guys, I have a silly question regarding this sentence

that emotions, including those deemed personal or private is a social phenomenon

emotions is a noun as per my understanding

and including is a verb-ing modifier but whenever V-ing modifier is modifying a noun it should not be separated by the comma


kindly correct me where i am wrong.
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Re: Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2018, 18:10
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shubham2312 wrote:
hi guys, I have a silly question regarding this sentence

that emotions, including those deemed personal or private is a social phenomenon

emotions is a noun as per my understanding

and including is a verb-ing modifier but whenever V-ing modifier is modifying a noun it should not be separated by the comma


kindly correct me where i am wrong.

shubham2312 , your question is not at all silly!
In fact, it's a very good question.

"including" is an exception to the rules that govern what you call V-ing modifiers
V-ing modifiers are also called present participles, participial modifiers, verbING, and __ING modifiers

"including" always modifies a noun or noun-type word or phrase
(I cannot think of a single exception)

including in this context belongs to the "additive phrase" group.
Including is similar to the phrases as well as, in addition to, and along with

(1) Additive phrases modify nouns in that they add nouns to another noun.
-- In this sentence, including adds personal or private emotions to the general category emotions
-- Similar: Foods rich in the antioxidant lycopene, including tomatoes and apricots, have been studied extensively.

(2) Additive phrases are not part of the subject itself.
-- Because additive phrases are not part of the subject itself, they often make verbs sound odd.
-- Correct: Espen, along with Kristoffer, travels frequently from Norway to France.
[singular subject, singular verb, despite the presence of two people in the sentence]

(3) Additive phrases often are defined as prepositions
-- Do not worry about the part of speech. Just remember that
"including" is an odd and exceptional ____ING modifier.

The pattern in this sentence is typical.
". . . that emotions, including those deemed personal or private, are . . ."
plural noun + comma + INCLUDING + nouns/pronouns that belong to the same group as the plural noun

THIS post discusses additive phrases and uses "including" in one of the author's SC mock questions.

Hope that helps.
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Re: Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2018, 18:27
AbdurRakib wrote:
Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions, including those deemed personal or private is a social phenomenon, though one inseparable from bodily response.

(A) private is a social phenomenon, though one inseparable
(B) private, are social phenomena that are inseparable
(C) private are a social phenomenon but are not those inseparable
(D) private—are social phenomena but not separable
(E) also as private emotions, are social phenomena not inseparable

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hi daagh / Other experts,

does not THAT in option B is modifying "Social Phenomenon" instead of intended "Emotions"
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Re: Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2018, 11:52
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How can we conclude that intention of the pronoun 'that' is to only emotions? By referring to a broad spectrum word phenomena, it means that the pronoun antecedes not only the emotions but also many more such abstract feelings.

However, let me also point out one technical factor. There
Is a difference between modification and antecedence? 'That' is often a relative pronoun that can refer to a previous noun or at times a more logical proximate noun. Per se, a relative pronoun technically never modifies anything. When we say modification, it involves a change in the original perception of something by providing additional information.

In addition, 'that' may also act as a subordinate conjunction in which case it neither antecedes nor modifies anything.

We must not get confused between antecedence and modification. This confusion may lead us to seek a distant modifyee than a nearer noun as in the case of emotions vs. phenomena.
The 'that' in the context cannot intend to jump over a verb 'are' and refer to the emotions. The reference tp phenomena seems to be correct in the answer B.
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Re: Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2019, 11:50
AbdurRakib wrote:
Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions, including those deemed personal or private is a social phenomenon, though one inseparable from bodily response.


(A) private is a social phenomenon, though one inseparable

(B) private, are social phenomena that are inseparable

(C) private are a social phenomenon but are not those inseparable

(D) private—are social phenomena but not separable

(E) also as private emotions, are social phenomena not inseparable


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It can only be B because of the comma
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Re: Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jun 2019, 03:36
AbdurRakib wrote:
Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions, including those deemed personal or private is a social phenomenon, though one inseparable from bodily response.


(A) private is a social phenomenon, though one inseparable

(B) private, are social phenomena that are inseparable

(C) private are a social phenomenon but are not those inseparable

(D) private—are social phenomena but not separable

(E) also as private emotions, are social phenomena not inseparable


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I have a query regarding the non-underlined portion. "Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument"
does this has SV pair?
Recent interdisciplinary studies: Subject
Advance:verb

if yes then studies are plural and advance is singular.

If its not a statement then what role is this playing?

I think I am missing something and not able to figure out. Can anyone clarify?
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Re: Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jun 2019, 02:54
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CrackVerbal33 wrote:
I have a query regarding the non-underlined portion. "Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument"
does this has SV pair?
Recent interdisciplinary studies: Subject
Advance:verb

if yes then studies are plural and advance is singular.

If its not a statement then what role is this playing?

I think I am missing something and not able to figure out. Can anyone clarify?
You have identified the subject and verb correctly.

Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument...

The one correction to be made here is that advance (verb) is plural. Advances is the one that we'd normally think of as being singular. For example:
Both players advance to the next round.
He advances to the next round.

It's the opposite when we use advance as a noun. Then it is singular.
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Re: Recent interdisciplinary studies advance the argument that emotions   [#permalink] 24 Jun 2019, 02:54

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