GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 20 Nov 2018, 23:58

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • All GMAT Club Tests are Free and open on November 22nd in celebration of Thanksgiving Day!

     November 22, 2018

     November 22, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Mark your calendars - All GMAT Club Tests are free and open November 22nd to celebrate Thanksgiving Day! Access will be available from 0:01 AM to 11:59 PM, Pacific Time (USA)
  • Free lesson on number properties

     November 23, 2018

     November 23, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Practice the one most important Quant section - Integer properties, and rapidly improve your skills.

The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 11 May 2015
Posts: 4
WE: Programming (Computer Software)
GMAT ToolKit User
The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 05 Jun 2018, 04:08
1
8
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

61% (01:01) correct 39% (01:09) wrong based on 278 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers for up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.


A) The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers for up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.

B) The first shoe factory had opened in 1760, but until the industrial revolution of the 19th century, inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers.

C) The first shoe factory opened in 1760, however inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers until the industrial revolution of the 19th century

D) The first shoe factory, though it opened in 1760, inexpensive shoes were not available to consumers up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.

E) The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not available to consumers until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.

Originally posted by Muruga on 28 Dec 2015, 07:03.
Last edited by Bunuel on 05 Jun 2018, 04:08, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Feb 2015
Posts: 105
Re: The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2015, 08:01
Muruga wrote:
The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers for up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.

a)The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers for up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.
b)The first shoe factory had opened in 1760, but until the industrial revolution of the 19th century, inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers.
c)The first shoe factory opened in 1760, however inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers until the industrial revolution of the 19th century
d)The first shoe factory, though it opened in 1760, inexpensive shoes were not available to consumers up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.
e)he first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not available to consumers until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.



E is the best choice. Does not use unnecessary 'middlemen' and keeps the sentence simple.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4526
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Dec 2015, 08:16
1
1
a). The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers for up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.--– ‘for up until’, ‘not at all’ etc are unidiomatic expressions

b). The first shoe factory had opened in 1760, but until the industrial revolution of the 19th century, inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers. --- The main grouse against this choice is that, the element starting with ‘but’ through… ‘19th century’ should not have been rendered inessential by putting that under a parenthesis. If it is removed, the choice turns meaningless. Add to this tactical error, the use of ‘not at all’; a problem - ridden choice.
c)The first shoe factory opened in 1760, however inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers until the industrial revolution of the 19th century ---Grammatically, use of ‘however’ does require a comma after the word.
d)The first shoe factory, though it opened in 1760, inexpensive shoes were not available to consumers up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.--- Though ‘it’ is redundant. Secondly ‘up until’ is unidiomatic.
e) The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not available to consumers until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.—this is the correct choice

One important issue about the past perfect ‘had opened’ and the simple past ‘opened’; IMO both are okay. Since the chronology is crystal clear by specifying the opening to 1760, and the subsequent happening to the 19th century, it is not incumbent that one needs to use the past perfect. However, it wouldn’t be a great error even if the past perfect is used.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Senior SC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 14 Nov 2016
Posts: 1319
Location: Malaysia
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Apr 2017, 19:45
Muruga wrote:
The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers for up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.

(A) The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers for up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.
(B) The first shoe factory had opened in 1760, but until the industrial revolution of the 19th century, inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers.
(C) The first shoe factory opened in 1760, however inexpensive shoes were not at all available to consumers until the industrial revolution of the 19th century
(D) The first shoe factory, though it opened in 1760, inexpensive shoes were not available to consumers up until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.
(E) The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not available to consumers until the industrial revolution of the 19th century.


OFFICIAL EXPLANATION


Correct Answer: E

The original sentence contains multiple redundancy errors, using the redundant phrases 'not at all available' ('at all' is unnecessary, as 'not available' succinctly states that there was no availability) and 'up until' ('until', on its own, serves the same purpose). Answer choices B and C replicate the 'not at all' error, and answer choice D replicates the 'up until' error; all are, accordingly, incorrect. Furthermore, answer choice D fails to use proper Sentence Construction, as there is no transition present between the verb phrases 'shoe factory' and 'inexpensive shoes'. Answer choice E, which uses proper sentence structure and avoids the redundant phrases mentioned above, is correct.
_________________

"Be challenged at EVERY MOMENT."

“Strength doesn’t come from what you can do. It comes from overcoming the things you once thought you couldn’t.”

"Each stage of the journey is crucial to attaining new heights of knowledge."

Rules for posting in verbal forum | Please DO NOT post short answer in your post!

Advanced Search : https://gmatclub.com/forum/advanced-search/

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 3405
Premium Member
Re: The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Oct 2018, 03:16
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
_________________

-
April 2018: New Forum dedicated to Verbal Strategies, Guides, and Resources

GMAT Club Bot
Re: The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not &nbs [#permalink] 19 Oct 2018, 03:16
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The first shoe factory opened in 1760, but inexpensive shoes were not

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.