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The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy

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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2017, 11:24
A is a trap because we will not know if this fact is helpful for the plan to remove the problem.
C is right even though it has "in other urbans", the main idea in C is that the plan will encourage people to use carpool; thus, the plan will succeed. "in other urbans" is just an evidence to support the idea that carpool will work.

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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2017, 14:20
mihir0710 wrote:
Got it may b A is correct

My reasoning : a probable weakener for the argument can be that what if all the people that are going by that central route have central area as their final destination and hence even if you charge them they have no option but to pay and still go that route ..
In this case the plan fails

So fill this loophole a supporting argument can be : since 1/5 are traveling to the other side of the city they do not actually want to go to central area but they are just using that route..
So, there is a scope that these people can take another route ..
So if they are forced to pay they may take the other route and thus reduce congestion..


Sent from my iPhone using GMAT Club Forum


I also voted for A using the same reasoning!
The fact that in other urban areas passing a similar law has encouraged carpooling doesn't mean that this would be a success also in this city! :!:

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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2017, 03:12
IMO answer is C.

For those who are asking why not A, i think this should help-

Even if government put congestion pricing, we dont know will the 20% divert their route or not. why?

-because we dont know- is there any other route for these 20%. We cannot expect that these 20% people will stop going to there respective destination. ( They will have to live with this fact and pay the congestion pricing)

-Even if there is a route, we dont know will it be viable option for the 20% population- Maybe it is too long a route which will cost equally high and maybe take double the time to travel.
And seeing the popularity of this route- ^^These assumption may not be an assumption but actual truth.

-Also, though option C also has a inherent assumption that public transport is not being used currently. But option A has much bigger problem.

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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2017, 17:46
stne wrote:
Skywalker18 wrote:
The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy - the clogging of the streets of the central business district alone cost the economy more than $1.2 billion over the past year. In order to address this problem, officials plan to introduce congestion pricing, by which drivers would pay to enter the city's most heavily trafficked areas during the busiest times of the day.

Which of the following, if true, would most strongly indicate that the plan will be a success?
A. Approximately one-fifth of the vehicles in the central business district are in transit from one side of the city to the other .
B.Planners expect that, without congestion pricing, traffic in Masana is likely to grow by 6 percent in the next five years .
C.In other urban areas, congestion pricing has strongly encouraged carpooling (sharing of rides by private commuters).
D.Several studies have shown that a reduction in traffic of 15 percent in Masana could result in 5,500 or more new jobs.
E.Over 30 percent of the vehicles in the city's center are occupied by more than one person


Just a view on option C :
if something has worked in city x does that necessarily mean that the same thing will work in city y too?
The demographics of both the cities may be entirely different.
Other urban city people may feel the pinch of congestion pricing, this urban city people may not feel so.
This particular urban city may have offices spread far apart that car pooling may not be possible even if people wanted to.
This particular urban city may have smaller sized cars that despite car pooling congestion may not reduce much.
There could be a host of other factors that may NOT give the same result as that achieved in other urban city.
An example :
Daytime mandatory head lamps being on, could reduce collision in city x due to high smog there,which reduces visibility, but the same effect should not be expected in city Y which has no smog and has excellent visibility.

Please correct me so that I can improve the logical flaws in my thought process.
I still feel B should have been the answer.
Is this really from OG 2018?



Exactly!! we generally tend to ignore the options with wrong/irrelevant comparison. I still doubt how can C be the correct option? IMO B.

Thanks,
Uma

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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 03:21
gmatexam439 wrote:
The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy - the clogging of the streets of the central business district alone cost the economy more than $1.2 billion over the past year. In order to address this problem, officials plan to introduce congestion pricing, by which drivers would pay to enter the city's most heavily trafficked areas during the busiest times of the day.

Which of the following, if true, would most strongly indicate that the plan will be a success?

A. Approximately one-fifth of the vehicles in the central business district are in transit from one side of the city to the other . - We are least bothered aboout how many vehicles are in transit

B.Planners expect that, without congestion pricing, traffic in Masana is likely to grow by 6 percent in the next five years . - The argument is about economy drain and not about traffic

C.In other urban areas, congestion pricing has strongly encouraged carpooling (sharing of rides by private commuters). - Looks good. Car pooling will help reduce the number of vehicles on road, thereby strengthening the argument.

D.Several studies have shown that a reduction in traffic of 15 percent in Masana could result in 5,500 or more new jobs. - The argument is about how congestion pricing might help improve the economy. This option tells us that the reduction in traffic will help - the argument also says so - but it doesn't tell us how congestion pricing will help the economy.

E.Over 30 percent of the vehicles in the city's center are occupied by more than one person - We are least interested in the number of people occupying the vehicles

My answer => C



Hi gmatexam439,

I agree with the reasoning that you have given for point B, stating that its about economy, not about traffic.
But in point C also, there is no mention/ relation to economy, it talks about car-pooling.

Its our own reasoning that more car pooling will decrease traffic and hence better the economy.
Similarly, why cant we deduce the same for point B, that if traffic increases by even 1% of what it is already... it will certainly affect the economy more than the current situation.

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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2017, 07:24
ChiranjeevSingh

Please validate the reasoning for A & B

A:- Approximately one-fifth of the vehicles in the central business district are in transit from one side of the city to the other :- Which route and at what time, nothing is mentioned as argument vouches for "congestion pricing (CP)" during selective timing at selective route

B:- Planners expect that, without congestion pricing, traffic in Masana is likely to grow by 6 percent in the next five years :- Current rate is not known, After CP , traffic rate is not known. It is possible that 6% is lower than current rate say 10%. In that case, even without CP purpose is getting solved.
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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2017, 23:20
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AbhiGarg2007 wrote:
ChiranjeevSingh

Please validate the reasoning for A & B

A:- Approximately one-fifth of the vehicles in the central business district are in transit from one side of the city to the other :- Which route and at what time, nothing is mentioned as argument vouches for "congestion pricing (CP)" during selective timing at selective route

B:- Planners expect that, without congestion pricing, traffic in Masana is likely to grow by 6 percent in the next five years :- Current rate is not known, After CP , traffic rate is not known. It is possible that 6% is lower than current rate say 10%. In that case, even without CP purpose is getting solved.


I've now written a detailed solution for it :)

http://gmatwithcj.com/solutions/critica ... s-economy/
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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 06:49
Skywalker18 wrote:
The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy - the clogging of the streets of the central business district alone cost the economy more than $1.2 billion over the past year. In order to address this problem, officials plan to introduce congestion pricing, by which drivers would pay to enter the city's most heavily trafficked areas during the busiest times of the day.

Which of the following, if true, would most strongly indicate that the plan will be a success?

(A) Approximately one-fifth of the vehicles in the central business district are in transit from one side of the city to the other .

(B) Planners expect that, without congestion pricing, traffic in Masana is likely to grow by 6 percent in the next five years .

(C) In other urban areas, congestion pricing has strongly encouraged carpooling (sharing of rides by private commuters).

(D) Several studies have shown that a reduction in traffic of 15 percent in Masana could result in 5,500 or more new jobs.

(E) Over 30 percent of the vehicles in the city's center are occupied by more than one person


Premise 1:The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy - the clogging of the streets of the central business district alone cost the economy more than $1.2 billion over the past year

Plan :In order to address this problem, officials plan to introduce congestion pricing, by which drivers would pay to enter the city's most heavily trafficked areas during the busiest times of the day

A is does not tell us any ting about the plan's success .If 1/5 of the vehicles are in transit we do not know whether they would not come in peak times or they would .
There can be only one way to go and that is heavily congested so i think it is not going to decrease congestion.

B is irrelevant

C this options tells us that this strategy has forced many private commuters to carpooling and thus reduce congestion , thus the plan would would work.
D Again this is irrelevant

E This also does not affect the argument and has no bearing on the plan.
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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2017, 12:11
GMATNinja wrote:
Nightmare007 wrote:
Hi daagh,
I am not satisfied with the explanations above for taking C to be better than A.
If A needs an assumption that Most of vehicles from these 20% outside vehicles will take alternate road because of the new rule.
So does C, C needs assumption that what worked in other city will work in the Manasa.
Sir, Can you please throw some light in this question.
Thank you.

Quote:
The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy - the clogging of the streets of the central business district alone cost the economy more than $1.2 billion over the past year. In order to address this problem, officials plan to introduce congestion pricing, by which drivers would pay to enter the city's most heavily trafficked areas during the busiest times of the day.

Which of the following, if true, would most strongly indicate that the plan will be a success?
A. Approximately one-fifth of the vehicles in the central business district are in transit from one side of the city to the other .
B.Planners expect that, without congestion pricing, traffic in Masana is likely to grow by 6 percent in the next five years .
C.In other urban areas, congestion pricing has strongly encouraged carpooling (sharing of rides by private commuters).
D.Several studies have shown that a reduction in traffic of 15 percent in Masana could result in 5,500 or more new jobs.
E.Over 30 percent of the vehicles in the city's center are occupied by more than one person

The question asks, "Which of the following would most strongly indicate that the plan will be a success?". We don't need an answer that proves with 100% certainty that what worked in other cities will work in Manasa. If the plan worked in other urban areas, this is strong evidence that the plan will work in Masana, and that's all we need.

Choice A, on the other hand, gives us no indication of whether the plan will succeed. The ratio of the number of vehicles traveling across the city to the number of vehicles just travelling into the central business district and back out (without crossing the city) makes no difference. We need evidence that the congestion pricing will reduce the clogging of the streets in the central business district, and the background information given in choice (A) does not provide evidence either way.

I hope this helps!


Why A is wrong? If the 20% of f the vehicles in the central business district are in transit from one side of the city to the other, taxing the drivers who enter the city's trafficked area could help reduce traffic in the district center

Why C is right? Even if congestion pricing helped to reduce traffic in other urban areas, NOT necessarily the strategy will work in Masana

I notice that in some CR questions some alternatives present some analogies, for example, if taxing companies reduced air pollution in the Boston area, the same will work in NY area- the one presented in the argument - such as the analogy in question (589). If taxing OTHER urban areas reduced traffic, so taxing the central district area will reduce traffic as well, and therefore the answer choice is correct. In the other hand, sometimes, the analogy is irrelevant, so the answer choice is wrong. So, how will I know that the answer choice using this kind of comparison will be right or wrong? The only thing I can think of is using process of elimination. Does that make sense?!

Many tks!

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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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GuilhermeAzevedo wrote:
Why A is wrong? If the 20% of f the vehicles in the central business district are in transit from one side of the city to the other, taxing the drivers who enter the city's trafficked area could help reduce traffic in the district center

Why C is right? Even if congestion pricing helped to reduce traffic in other urban areas, NOT necessarily the strategy will work in Masana

I notice that in some CR questions some alternatives present some analogies, for example, if taxing companies reduced air pollution in the Boston area, the same will work in NY area- the one presented in the argument - such as the analogy in question (589). If taxing OTHER urban areas reduced traffic, so taxing the central district area will reduce traffic as well, and therefore the answer choice is correct. In the other hand, sometimes, the analogy is irrelevant, so the answer choice is wrong. So, how will I know that the answer choice using this kind of comparison will be right or wrong? The only thing I can think of is using process of elimination. Does that make sense?!

Many tks!

The plan is to make drivers pay to enter the city's most heavily trafficked areas during the busiest times of the day. We need to select the answer that most strongly suggests that the plan will reduce the traffic congestion.

Quote:
A. Approximately one-fifth of the vehicles in the central business district are in transit from one side of the city to the other .

Choice (A) tells us that one-fifth of the vehicles are in transit from one side of the city to the other, so, yes, congestion pricing might encourage those drivers to take an alternate route. But congestion pricing could also have NO effect on those drivers, who might prefer to pay a fee rather than drive all the way around the city. Choice (A) does not present any evidence indicating how those drivers will react, if at all, to the congestion pricing. And what about the other four-fifths of the vehicles? Will their drivers be affected by the congestion pricing?

The biggest problem with (A) is that it does not present any evidence to suggest HOW the drivers will react to the congestion pricing.

Quote:
C.In other urban areas, congestion pricing has strongly encouraged carpooling (sharing of rides by private commuters).

True, just because it worked somewhere else does NOT NECESSARILY mean it will work in Masana. But we are not asked to PROVE that the plan will work. We only need something that STRONGLY INDICATES that the plan will be a success.

Choice (C) provides evidence regarding HOW other drivers reacted to congestion pricing, exactly the kind of evidence that was lacking in choice (A). Thus, we now have EVIDENCE that the plan could have a similar on drivers in Masana. Sure, this doesn't prove anything, but it is better than (A) and the other options.

Whether the analogous situation is relevant will depend on what they are asking. Regardless, process of elimination is definitely your best friend!

I hope that helps!
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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 12 Oct 2017, 10:36
GMATNinja wrote:
If the plan worked in other urban areas, this is strong evidence that the plan will work in Masana, and that's all we need.


Hi GMATNinja,

Case-1: In few CR questions we see a choice like "C" is wrong for the reason that WHAT IS TRUE FOR OTHER CITY MIGHT NOT BE TRUE FOR THIS CITY.

Case-2: In other CR question a choice like "C" is correct for the reason that WHAT IS TRUE FOR OTHER CITY could be TRUE FOR THIS CITY.

Case-2 is applicable in this question in choice C, as you also noted as the reasoning above.

This distinction has been a problem for me since long and i have not found the right reasoning and solution for it.

I really need your help in understanding when the comparison for a situation happened/handled in one area/city with OTHER is considered correct/incorrect.

Thanks.
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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy [#permalink]

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New post 12 Oct 2017, 22:41
Hi, Why not D? If there are 5500 more jobs by the reduction in traffic then clearly this strengthens the argument?

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Re: The heavy traffic in Masana is a growing drain on the city's economy   [#permalink] 12 Oct 2017, 22:41

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