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The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than

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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jan 2016, 05:16
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The use of 'semicolon and however' is acceptable as far English grammar is concerned; the following links may help to explain that.

http://www.grammar-monster.com/lessons/ ... hrases.htm

https://www.sonoma.edu/users/f/farahman ... owever.pdf

The following is the response from MGMAT regarding the use of however with a semicolon

https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... t2197.html

So, I feel that E cannot be faulted on that count.
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2016, 17:03
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Only in E, there is a comparison between Javelin and discus, other options compare Javelin's sharp point and discus, which is not correct.
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Feb 2017, 15:48
blueseas wrote:
Marcab wrote:
The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than the discus; moreover, the discus is actually more likely to injure bystanders because, especially when wet, it can slip out of the thrower's hand and fly in a random trajectory.
javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than the discus; moreover,
javelin has a sharp point and is obviously more dangerous than the discus; however,
javelin's sharp point is obviously more dangerous than the discus, even though
javelin's sharp point makes it obviously more dangerous than the discus, even though
javelin, with its sharp point, is more obviously dangerous than the discus; however,


there are two independent clauses before and after the semicolon.According to the meaning of the sentence we need a contrast with both these ICs.therefore the use of MOREOVER is wrong .THATS WHY A is wrong.

in C and D we are comparing sharp point with DISCUSS ==>this is wrong comparison.

option B is wrong because IS => linking verb AND SHOULD NEVER BE FOLLOWED BY ADVERBS.
In option B IS is followed by OBVIOUSLY this is wrong.

HENCE E



From where do you got that rule that a linking verb should never be followed by an adverb ?
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2017, 10:11
asdfghjklasdfghj wrote:
From where do you got that rule that a linking verb should never be followed by an adverb ?


I agree with your point. I am also not aware of any such rule.

B is incorrect because it changes the original meaning of the sentence.

As per the original meaning, sharp point makes javelin more dangerous, but in B this meaning is distorted. Hence wrong.
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2017, 21:07
The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than the discus; moreover, the discus is actually more likely to injure bystanders because, especially when wet, it can slip out of the thrower's hand and fly in a random trajectory.

(A) javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than the discus; moreover,
(B) javelin has a sharp point and is obviously more dangerous than the discus; however,
(C) javelin's sharp point is obviously more dangerous than the discus, even though
(D) javelin's sharp point makes it obviously more dangerous than the discus, even though
(E) javelin, with its sharp point, is more obviously dangerous than the discus; however,
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Dec 2018, 00:57
Bull78 wrote:
The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than the discus; moreover, the discus is actually more likely to injure bystanders because, especially when wet, it can slip out of the thrower's hand and fly in a random trajectory.


(A) javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than the discus; moreover,

(B) javelin has a sharp point and is obviously more dangerous than the discus; however,

(C) javelin's sharp point is obviously more dangerous than the discus, even though

(D) javelin's sharp point makes it obviously more dangerous than the discus, even though

(E) javelin, with its sharp point, is more obviously dangerous than the discus; however,


Please let me know if my reasoning is flawed:

A) Moreover is incorrect because we need to show contrast. X does this, but Y actually does it more. Need a conjunction that conveys a meaning similar to BUT
B) The meaning becomes kind of skewed here when you say obviously more dangerous. If the Javelin IS, in fact, more dangerous, than the discus cannot be more dangerous making the second part of this sentence non sensical
C) More needs to modify obviously dangerous similar to B
D) same as C, but I also think IT can be an error as well (not 100% about this). Can IT refer to Javelin in this case?
E) CORRECT
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2018, 22:24
Bull78 wrote:
The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than the discus; moreover, the discus is actually more likely to injure bystanders because, especially when wet, it can slip out of the thrower's hand and fly in a random trajectory.


(A) javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than the discus; moreover,

(B) javelin has a sharp point and is obviously more dangerous than the discus; however,

(C) javelin's sharp point is obviously more dangerous than the discus, even though

(D) javelin's sharp point makes it obviously more dangerous than the discus, even though

(E) javelin, with its sharp point, is more obviously dangerous than the discus; however,




The second part of the sentence (after the underlined part) is meant to show contrast and thus, A can be eliminated for the use of "moreover".
"Javelin" and not "Javelin's sharp point" needs to be the subject here. Hence, C and D can be eliminated.
E is awkward in "more obviously dangerous" and is a good trap; many would eliminate it thinking that "obviously more dangerous" (in choice B) is the correct usage but the intended meaning of the sentence is that although javelin is "more obviously dangerous", discus is (practically) more so.
E is the best choice.
Great question!
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2019, 09:38
‘However’ is needed here to show the proper sense of contrast that the sentence intends. Thus, only B and E are the only possible options. Between these E is clearly the correct option. B simply states that the Javelin is more dangerous, undercutting the contrast that the sentence is supposed to convey. E, however, says that the javelin ‘is more obviously dangerous, which means that it is only apparently more dangerous.
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2019, 09:48
egmat wrote:
Hi @archit143,

D) javelin's sharp point makes it obviously more dangerous than the discus, even though: Incorrect.

Notice the use of “it” in this choice. This pronoun stands for “sharp point”. It cannot refer to “javelin’s” because this entity is a modifier, an adjective. So “it” stands for “sharp point”. Now per this choice, “sharp point” has been compared to “discus”. These two entities are not comparable. This illogical comparison makes this choice incorrect.

Also the placement of “more” is not correct in this choice. Read my previous post on the usage of “more” in this sentence.

“however” also starts fresh sentences. We form complete sentences with “however”. This is the reason why use of semicolon is not incorrect in some of the answer choices, including the correct one.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
Shraddha


@Shraddha-Applying the same logic on other SC question:

Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits on the market.

1.Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making it one of the healthiest widely available fruits

2.Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than almost any other fruit, making them one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

3.Recent studies have shown that the antioxidants found in the acai berry boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, which makes the acai berry one of the healthiest widely available fruits

4.Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than those in almost any other fruit, it is one of the healthiest fruits that is widely available

5.Because the acai berry’s antioxidants boost immune cell function more effectively than the antioxidants found in almost any other fruit, they are one of the healthiest widely available fruits

The correct answer is 4.
Here usage of 'It' should be wrong since it is referring to antioxidants.
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The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2019, 01:47
OFFICIAL EXPLANATION

This sentence describes a contrast between appearance and reality: the javelin seems more dangerous than the discus, because of its physical appearance, but the discus is actually more likely to injure bystanders. The sentence must express this contrast with an appropriate transition. Additionally, the adverb obviously must be placed with care: if obviously is placed in front of more dangerous, then the resulting sentence contradicts itself. The intended meaning is not that the javelin is actually more dangerous, but, rather, that the danger posed by the javelin is more obvious than that posed by the discus; therefore, obviously should be placed directly in front of dangerous.

(A) The relative pronoun which refers to a sharp point, thus setting up a comparison between a sharp point and the discus. This comparison is nonparallel; the sentence should compare the discus with the javelin itself, not with the javelin's point. The connector moreover, while acceptable from the standpoint of pure grammar, is illogical, since the following observation does not reinforce the preceding one.

(B) This sentence is self-contradictory: it begins by stating that the javelin is "obviously more dangerous" than the discus, but then describes the discus as more dangerous. Additionally, the connector and illogically suggests that the obviousness of the danger posed by the javelin is independent of its having a sharp point.

(C) This version sets up a comparison between the javelin's sharp point and the discus. This comparison is nonparallel; the sentence should compare the discus with the javelin itself, not with the javelin's point. Also, this sentence is self-contradictory: it begins by stating that the javelin is "obviously more dangerous" than the discus, but then describes the discus as more dangerous.

(D) This sentence is self-contradictory: it begins by stating that the javelin is "obviously more dangerous" than the discus, but then describes the discus as more dangerous. This version also sets up a comparison between the javelin's sharp point and the discus. This comparison is nonparallel; the sentence should compare the discus with the javelin itself, not with the javelin's point.

(E) CORRECT. This choice places obviously in front of dangerous, correctly conveying the intended idea that the danger posed by the javelin is more obvious than that posed by the discus. The modifier with its sharp point is correctly used to explain why the javelin is so obviously dangerous. Finally, the second clause is introduced by however, a transition that correctly indicates the contrast between the two clauses.
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2019, 00:00
why is obviously cannot be used after and
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2019, 11:42
Made a silly mistake and chose B. is sharp and is dangerous cannot be a different statemwent. E clearly says that it is sharp and hence dangerous.
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously dangerous than   [#permalink] 11 Jun 2019, 11:42

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