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The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions

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The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 05 Nov 2018, 08:13
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The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions of slow economic growth in the coming year. However, those predictions would not have affected the employment rate if it had not been for the lack of capital reserves of major industries. So if major industries increase their capital reserves, the employment rate will not decline in the future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most doubt on the validity of the argument above?


A. Major industry foresaw the drop in employment.

B. Some major industries had appreciable capital reserves.

C. An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate.

D. The government could pass legislation mandating that major industries set aside a fixed amount as capital reserves every year.

E. The drop in the employment rate was more severe this year than last.

Originally posted by aaron22197 on 08 Jul 2008, 05:02.
Last edited by Bunuel on 05 Nov 2018, 08:13, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Feb 2016, 05:16
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RAHKARP27071989 wrote:

Hi chetan2u,

I got your reasoning, but one more thing to ask..

Quote:
Up to my understanding if GMAT question says-->Increasing A leads to increase B ) And now we need to weaken this conclusion
That means we need to show Increasing A DOES NOT leads to increase B
Now, if we come across an option which says Increasing C DOES NOT leads to increase B ( This option can't WEAKEN until C and A are interlinked )


you are correct in the observation. But the logic in the Q does not follow the same pattern..
It says:- However, those predictions would not have affected the employment rate if it had not been for the lack of capital reserves of major industries...
the use of "if it had not been for" tells us that capital reseves is the only reason"
So to negate it, we have to show " that there can be other reasons too which can lead to same outcome"

here the logic is..
1)A would not have happened if it had not been for B..
that is Only B can lead to A..
2)to weaken this, you have to show C can also lead to A..
this is exactly Choice C is doing ..

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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2008, 06:18
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The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions of slow economic growth in the coming year. However, those predictions would not have affected the employment rate if it had not been for the lack of capital reserves of major industries. So if major industries increase their capital reserves, the employment rate will not decline in the future.


Which of the following, if true, casts the most doubt on the validity of the argument above?


C)An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate.

This clearly mentiones that just increasing capital reserves will not stop the employement rate. There are other factors/variables that can affect the employement rate.
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2013, 10:31
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The conclusion is that "if major industries increase their capital reserves, the
employment rate will not decline in the future." Why? Because major industry did
not have capital reserves. The author assumes that having capital reserves is
sufficient to prevent a decline in the employment rate. We are asked to cast
doubt (i.e., weaken) the author's claim.
(A) Whether the drop in employment was foreseen does not relate to the core of
the argument, which is that capital reserves will prevent another decline in the
employment rate.
(B) The fact that some major industries had appreciable capital reserves does
not contradict the claim that an increase in these reserves would prevent a future
drop in employment rates.
(C) CORRECT. The author neglects to take into account the fact that other
factors, such as an increase in labor costs, could adversely affect the
employment rate. For example, if the cost of labor becomes prohibitively
expensive, even with increased reserves, the employment rate could decline.
(D) Legislation mandating a certain level of reserves does not contradict the
claim that increased reserves would prevent a drop in employment rates.
(E) The fact that the employment rate was more severe this year than last does
not contradict the claim that an increase in reserves would prevent a drop in the
employment rate.
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jan 2016, 10:38
1
Hi souvik101990,

Can you please share OE...??


chetan2u,

Although I choose the correct answer, but I am not convinced.
I opted C because other options ( A, D and E) are completely irrelevant.

Now left with B and C.

Conclusion- if major industries increase their capital reserves, the employment rate will not decline in the future
As we have to weaken the argument, so we need to find an option which says
Increasing capital reserve not going improve employment rate.

B. Some major industries had appreciable capital reserves.
The word "SOME" makes me cautious. Therefore eliminated.

C. An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate.

I opted it bcz nothing left.
What is the link between LABOR COSTS and CASH RESERVES....?

Does it mean if labor cost increases then we have to take amount from cash reserve and hence employment rate not going to improve..?
Am I rite..?

Please assist.
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jan 2016, 20:35
RAHKARP27071989 wrote:
Hi souvik101990,

Can you please share OE...??


chetan2u,

Although I choose the correct answer, but I am not convinced.
I opted C because other options ( A, D and E) are completely irrelevant


Conclusion- if major industries increase their capital reserves, the employment rate will not decline in the future
As we have to weaken the argument, so we need to find an option which says
Increasing capital reserve not going improve employment rate.

B. Some major industries had appreciable capital reserves.
The word "SOME" makes me cautious. Therefore eliminated.

C. An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate.

I opted it bcz nothing left.
What is the link between LABOR COSTS and CASH RESERVES....?

Does it mean if labor cost increases then we have to take amount from cash reserve and hence employment rate not going to improve..?
Am I rite..?

Please assist.


Hi,

here, we have to doubt the argument, and just not the conclusion..

the argument is..
decline in employment rate was spurred by predictions of slow growth. However,predictions would not have affected if major ind had capital reserves...
and conclusion is
if the major industries increase their cash reserves, there will be no decline in employment rate..

You have eliminated B for correct reasons ..

the reasoning for C to be correct is:-
C. An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate...

C is giving reasons other than sufficient reserves that can result in decrease of employment rate.
So even if the industries had sufficient reserves, an increase in labour costs can lead to decrease in employment rate..
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2016, 14:45
chetan2u wrote:
RAHKARP27071989 wrote:
Hi souvik101990,

Can you please share OE...??


chetan2u,

Although I choose the correct answer, but I am not convinced.
I opted C because other options ( A, D and E) are completely irrelevant.

Now left with B and C.

Conclusion- if major industries increase their capital reserves, the employment rate will not decline in the future
As we have to weaken the argument, so we need to find an option which says
Increasing capital reserve not going improve employment rate.

B. Some major industries had appreciable capital reserves.
The word "SOME" makes me cautious. Therefore eliminated.

C. An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate.

I opted it bcz nothing left.
What is the link between LABOR COSTS and CASH RESERVES....?

Does it mean if labor cost increases then we have to take amount from cash reserve and hence employment rate not going to improve..?
Am I rite..?

Please assist.


Hi,

here, we have to doubt the argument, and just not the conclusion..

the argument is..
decline in employment rate was spurred by predictions of slow growth. However,predictions would not have affected if major ind had capital reserves...
and conclusion is
if the major industries increase their cash reserves, there will be no decline in employment rate..

You have eliminated B for correct reasons ..

the reasoning for C to be correct is:-
C. An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate...

C is giving reasons other than sufficient reserves that can result in decrease of employment rate.
So even if the industries had sufficient reserves, an increase in labour costs can lead to decrease in employment rate..



Hi chetan2u,

I got your reasoning, but one more thing to ask..

Up to my understanding if GMAT question says-->Increasing A leads to increase B ) And now we need to weaken this conclusion
That means we need to show Increasing A DOES NOT leads to increase B
Now, if we come across an option which says Increasing C DOES NOT leads to increase B ( This option can't WEAKEN until C and A are interlinked )

In argument

The conclusion says-->
Increase in Cash reserves leads to improve employment rate or decrease Unemployment.
Now if any option gives any kind of connection between Labor cost and Employment Rate--> WE DON'T CARE
Bcz we just need to prove Improving Cash reserves does not improve employment rate.

We will only consider any option if it is going to make impact on Cash reserve and in turn impact on employment rate.

CORRECT ME IF I AM WRONG
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2017, 20:54
Conclusion :- "So if major industries increase their capital reserves, the employment rate will not decline in the future."

Weaken :- "Major industries increase their capital reserves, the employment rate will decline in the future."

To weaken, we just need to find a choice that tells us there are other ways to decrease the employment rate. The answer choice C fits the bill :-

(C) CORRECT. The author neglects to take into account the fact that other factors, such as an increase in labor costs, could adversely affect the
employment rate. For example, if the cost of labor becomes prohibitively expensive, even with increased reserves, the employment rate could decline.
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Nov 2018, 05:32
aaron22197 wrote:
The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions of slow economic growth in the coming year. However, those predictions would not have affected the employment rate if it had not been for the lack of capital reserves of major industries. So if major industries increase their capital reserves, the employment rate will not decline in the future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most doubt on the validity of the argument above?


A. Major industry foresaw the drop in employment.

B. Some major industries had appreciable capital reserves.

C. An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate.

D. The government could pass legislation mandating that major industries set aside a fixed amount as capital reserves every year.

E. The drop in the employment rate was more severe this year than last.


I think this is not a 700Q. Anyways let's get to basics.

Major industries increase the capital reserve -> no decline in the unemployment rate.
To weaken the conclusion, You must see this as a causal passage. increasing capital reserve as the cause and decline in the unemployment as the effect.
If A causes B, to weaken the conclusion One can show B causes A or C causes B.

Anyways...
D. The government could pass legislation mandating that major industries set aside a fixed amount as capital reserves every year.

Tell me honestly would it weaken the conclusion, if the government mandates major industries to set aside a fixed amount. Then the employment rate might decline due to other factors or might not decline because of the available money..

E. The drop in the employment rate was more severe this year than last.

Drop in the employment rate in this year was more, so What? I should increase more reserve? Note that the increase in the reserve has not yet taken place. If it had taken place and the drop in the employment rate was more severe then it would be a weakener.. so as of now it is not.

A. Major industry foresaw the drop in employment.

Okay if they did why did not they increase the capital reserve? How is this related to capital reserve increase?

B. Some major industries had appreciable capital reserves.
Yes it did.. Why did then the employment rate decline.. because only some major industries only had capital reserves? .. so if all had there would be no shortage of employment.. isn't this strengthening..


C. An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate.

If an increase in labor cost affected the employment rate... then capital reserves had no-effect (PROBABLY); so this is the best weakener.
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Mar 2019, 23:23
VeritasKarishma AjiteshArun chetan2u
In Option B if we had most instead of some will it be a correct option then ?
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2019, 03:37
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teaserbae wrote:
VeritasKarishma AjiteshArun chetan2u
In Option B if we had most instead of some will it be a correct option then ?
Maybe, as then B would do a much better job of weakening the support. However, I don't think the GMAT would put you in a position where you'd have to choose between C and the "new version" of B.
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2019, 23:24
aaron22197 wrote:
The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions of slow economic growth in the coming year. However, those predictions would not have affected the employment rate if it had not been for the lack of capital reserves of major industries. So if major industries increase their capital reserves, the employment rate will not decline in the future.

Which of the following, if true, casts the most doubt on the validity of the argument above?


A. Major industry foresaw the drop in employment.

B. Some major industries had appreciable capital reserves.

C. An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate.

D. The government could pass legislation mandating that major industries set aside a fixed amount as capital reserves every year.

E. The drop in the employment rate was more severe this year than last.



ChiranjeevSingh

Sir i went through your document on Alternate Cause and learnt the following:

1. “X leads/can lead/will lead to Y” allows the possibility of an alternate route, Z, to reach the
effect, Y. Therefore, an option statement presenting an alternate route does not weaken this
conclusion type.
2. “X led to Y” is presenting a reason (X) for a specific occurrence in the past (Y). An option
statement suggesting an alternate cause, Z, led to Y, creates doubts on the conclusion and thus,
weakens the argument.


Applying the same in this question:

Argument : ↑ Capital Reserves ------> Employment Rate WILL NOT decline (Futuristic)

Since the above argument is of the class 'WILL LEAD TO" , An alternate route doesn't weaken the conclusion type.
(the word 'ONLY' is also not explicitly stated)

Then why is option C " An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate." which is an alternate route weakens the argument ?

Kindly help me with this concern?
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Re: The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2019, 09:21
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sahilbhatia21 wrote:

ChiranjeevSingh

Sir i went through your document on Alternate Cause and learnt the following:

1. “X leads/can lead/will lead to Y” allows the possibility of an alternate route, Z, to reach the
effect, Y. Therefore, an option statement presenting an alternate route does not weaken this
conclusion type.
2. “X led to Y” is presenting a reason (X) for a specific occurrence in the past (Y). An option
statement suggesting an alternate cause, Z, led to Y, creates doubts on the conclusion and thus,
weakens the argument.


Applying the same in this question:

Argument : ↑ Capital Reserves ------> Employment Rate WILL NOT decline (Futuristic)

Since the above argument is of the class 'WILL LEAD TO" , An alternate route doesn't weaken the conclusion type.
(the word 'ONLY' is also not explicitly stated)

Then why is option C " An increase in labor costs could adversely affect the employment rate." which is an alternate route weakens the argument ?

Kindly help me with this concern?


Hi Sahil,

Option C is not presenting an alternate cause. The conclusion here is: "If you do X, Y will not happen". An alternate cause will give you another way to make Y NOT happen. Right?

However, option C gives us a way to make Y HAPPEN. Essentially, option C gives us a reason to believe that even if we do X, Y will still happen. Thus, it weakens the argument.
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The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2019, 16:45
The argument is that the employment rate will not drop if major industries increase their capital reserves.
This is supported by the fact the recent decline in employment rate was spurred by predictions of slow economic growth.
It is stated that these predictions wouldn't have been made if not for a lack of capital reserves
So the author assumes that having capital reserves is sufficient to preventing a drop in the employment rate.

We are asked to weaken the argument

A is incorrect because it solidifies the cause-effect relationship.

B is tempting as it points out "some" had appreciable reserves. But "some" could be 2-3 out of 100 industries, so this wouldn't really negate the cause-effect relationship.

C is correct because it points out an alternate cause for the stated effect.

D is incorrect because it points out a hypothetical situation not conducive to the present.

E is incorrect because the argument is actually concerned with the current prediction, not prior predictions.
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The recent decline in the employment rate was spurred by predictions   [#permalink] 25 Jul 2019, 16:45
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