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The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft

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The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2018, 08:15
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The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft intended to hold up to 1500 pounds of cargo while retaining buoyancy in the ocean. The raft has a compact design before the compressed air is deployed, but once deployed in the beta test, it expanded in less than 7 seconds to its full size. In the beta test, the raft remained to float for an extended period with a dry load of 1500 pounds. Surely, if the combined weight of passengers is below 1500 lbs, this raft could keep them afloat in relatively calm ocean waters.

Which of the following would strengthen that argument, in particular, strengthen that conclusion?

(A) their inflation process does not occur in such a way that standers-by could be injured by it.
(B) it would be relatively easy for a passenger in the water to climb up into the raft.
(C) these beta tests were conducted in fresh water which is less dense than salt water.
(D) the combined weight of the passengers would include any life vests they are wearing
(E) in certain areas of the ocean, the pattern of current typically makes a region of the waters relatively wave-free.
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Re: The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2018, 12:01
chesstitans wrote:
The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft intended to hold up to 1500 pounds of cargo while retaining buoyancy in the ocean.

The raft has a compact design before the compressed air is deployed, but once deployed in the beta test, it expanded in less than 7 seconds to its full size. In the beta test, the raft remained to float for an extended period with a dry load of 1500 pounds. Surely, if the combined weight of passengers is below 1500 lbs, this raft could keep them afloat in relatively calm ocean waters.

which of the following would strengthen that argument, in particular, strengthen that conclusion?

A, their inflation process does not occur in such a way that standers-by could be injured by it.
B, it would be relatively easy for a passenger in the water to climb up into the raft.
C, these beta tests were conducted in fresh water which is less dense than salt water.
D, the combined weight of the passengers would include any life vests they are wearing
E, in certain areas of the ocean, the pattern of current typically makes a region of the waters relatively wave-free.


Correct answer must be (C) for the highlighted errors in other options..

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Re: The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2018, 12:38
Can you explain how the answer is c.....

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Re: The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jan 2018, 19:52
viv007 wrote:
Can you explain how the answer is c.....

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more dense = salt sea water = have more power to keep raft afloat.
It support and strengthen the argument.
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Re: The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2018, 05:44
how is density related to keep the raft floating ? Seems like we need to apply outside physics knowledge for option C

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Re: The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2018, 05:42
chesstitans wrote:
The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft intended to hold up to 1500 pounds of cargo while retaining buoyancy in the ocean.
The raft has a compact design before the compressed air is deployed, but once deployed in the beta test, it expanded in less than 7 seconds to its full size. In the beta test, the raft remained to float for an extended period with a dry load of 1500 pounds. Surely, if the combined weight of passengers is below 1500 lbs, this raft could keep them afloat in relatively calm ocean waters.

which of the following would strengthen that argument, in particular, strengthen that conclusion?

A, their inflation process does not occur in such a way that standers-by could be injured by it.
. B, it would be relatively easy for a passenger in the water to climb up into the raft.
C, these beta tests were conducted in fresh water which is less dense than salt water.
D, the combined weight of the passengers would include any life vests they are wearing
E, in certain areas of the ocean, the pattern of current typically makes a region of the waters relatively wave-free.


A is out for unrelated information
B we are not concerned about the ease of climbing into the raft from water .It may true but we are just interested in whether the raft can hold 1500 lbs in relatively calm water.
D so we are gain not concerned about how the weight is distributed on the raft .
E Out of scope

The official answer is C but still i am unable to relate C with the argument
Hi mikemcgarry
Please explain the logic behind the choice .
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Re: The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2018, 16:57
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arvind910619 wrote:
chesstitans wrote:
The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft intended to hold up to 1500 pounds of cargo while retaining buoyancy in the ocean.
The raft has a compact design before the compressed air is deployed, but once deployed in the beta test, it expanded in less than 7 seconds to its full size. In the beta test, the raft remained to float for an extended period with a dry load of 1500 pounds. Surely, if the combined weight of passengers is below 1500 lbs, this raft could keep them afloat in relatively calm ocean waters.

which of the following would strengthen that argument, in particular, strengthen that conclusion?

A, their inflation process does not occur in such a way that standers-by could be injured by it.
. B, it would be relatively easy for a passenger in the water to climb up into the raft.
C, these beta tests were conducted in fresh water which is less dense than salt water.
D, the combined weight of the passengers would include any life vests they are wearing
E, in certain areas of the ocean, the pattern of current typically makes a region of the waters relatively wave-free.


A is out for unrelated information
B we are not concerned about the ease of climbing into the raft from water .It may true but we are just interested in whether the raft can hold 1500 lbs in relatively calm water.
D so we are gain not concerned about how the weight is distributed on the raft .
E Out of scope

The official answer is C but still i am unable to relate C with the argument
Hi mikemcgarry
Please explain the logic behind the choice .

Dear arvind910619,

I'm the author of this question and I'm happy to respond. :-)

It's important to understand all the words in the prompt--if there's a term that appears in the prompt that you don't know, you really have to understand its precise definition and all its implications.

Here, one critical word is "buoyancy." Superficially, it means "ability to float." Another that appears in choice (C) is "density." This is "the ratio of the mass of an object to the total volume of an object."

Think about what those definitions imply. A substance of very low density, such as styrofoam, would float, while a substance of very high density, such as a solid block of iron, would not float--it would sink immediately. In other words, density has something to do with buoyancy, with whether something floats. That's the general idea of why there's a connection between (C) and the argument.

To understand more precisely, you have to have a basic understanding of physical science--in the US, these mostly likely would be facts taught in middle school (grades 7-8). The density of water is around 1 gram/(cm^3)--in fact, historically, that was the original motivation for the definition of the "gram." If an object has a density greater than the density of water, the object sinks in water; conversely, if an object has a density less than the density of water, the object floats in water--that is to say, it is buoyant. More generally, an object is buoyant in a fluid floats and is buoyant in that fluid if the density of the object is less than the density of the fluid. For example, a solid block of iron will sink in water, but it will float in a vat of mercury, the liquid metal that is even more dense than iron.

Now, let's take this understand back to the CR argument.
(C) these beta tests were conducted in fresh water which is less dense than salt water.
For illustration purposes, let's make up imaginary numbers. Let's say that fresh water has a density of 1.00, and let's pretend that salt water has a density of 1.10. Well, if the raft floated in fresh water, it had to have a density less than 1.00. Any number less than 1.00 is definitely less than 1.10!! (Mathematically, that property is called "transitivity of inequality": if M < N and N < P, then we know M < P.) Therefore, buoyancy in freshwater would be a strong guarantee of buoyancy in salt water. This is why (C) strengthens the argument.

Further real-life connections to (C): I don't know whether you have noticed that it's slightly easier to float and bob in ocean water than it is in, say, a fresh water river or lake. The Dead Sea on the Israel/Jordan border has a particularly high salt content, so much that nothing can live in that water, and correspondingly, a particularly high density, which makes floating almost effortless.

For the GMAT CR, you don't need an expert level of knowledge, but you need to have a familiarity with what I would call the basic facts of the world: basic physical science, basic economics, basic facts about world's political & judicial systems, etc. etc. See:
GMAT Critical Reasoning and Outside Knowledge

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2018, 13:41
mikemcgarry wrote:
arvind910619 wrote:
chesstitans wrote:
The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft intended to hold up to 1500 pounds of cargo while retaining buoyancy in the ocean.
The raft has a compact design before the compressed air is deployed, but once deployed in the beta test, it expanded in less than 7 seconds to its full size. In the beta test, the raft remained to float for an extended period with a dry load of 1500 pounds. Surely, if the combined weight of passengers is below 1500 lbs, this raft could keep them afloat in relatively calm ocean waters.

which of the following would strengthen that argument, in particular, strengthen that conclusion?

A, their inflation process does not occur in such a way that standers-by could be injured by it.
. B, it would be relatively easy for a passenger in the water to climb up into the raft.
C, these beta tests were conducted in fresh water which is less dense than salt water.
D, the combined weight of the passengers would include any life vests they are wearing
E, in certain areas of the ocean, the pattern of current typically makes a region of the waters relatively wave-free.


A is out for unrelated information
B we are not concerned about the ease of climbing into the raft from water .It may true but we are just interested in whether the raft can hold 1500 lbs in relatively calm water.
D so we are gain not concerned about how the weight is distributed on the raft .
E Out of scope

The official answer is C but still i am unable to relate C with the argument
Hi mikemcgarry
Please explain the logic behind the choice .

Dear arvind910619,

I'm the author of this question and I'm happy to respond. :-)

It's important to understand all the words in the prompt--if there's a term that appears in the prompt that you don't know, you really have to understand its precise definition and all its implications.

Here, one critical word is "buoyancy." Superficially, it means "ability to float." Another that appears in choice (C) is "density." This is "the ratio of the mass of an object to the total volume of an object."

Think about what those definitions imply. A substance of very low density, such as styrofoam, would float, while a substance of very high density, such as a solid block of iron, would not float--it would sink immediately. In other words, density has something to do with buoyancy, with whether something floats. That's the general idea of why there's a connection between (C) and the argument.

To understand more precisely, you have to have a basic understanding of physical science--in the US, these mostly likely would be facts taught in middle school (grades 7-8). The density of water is around 1 gram/(cm^3)--in fact, historically, that was the original motivation for the definition of the "gram." If an object has a density greater than the density of water, the object sinks in water; conversely, if an object has a density less than the density of water, the object floats in water--that is to say, it is buoyant. More generally, an object is buoyant in a fluid floats and is buoyant in that fluid if the density of the object is less than the density of the fluid. For example, a solid block of iron will sink in water, but it will float in a vat of mercury, the liquid metal that is even more dense than iron.

Now, let's take this understand back to the CR argument.
(C) these beta tests were conducted in fresh water which is less dense than salt water.
For illustration purposes, let's make up imaginary numbers. Let's say that fresh water has a density of 1.00, and let's pretend that salt water has a density of 1.10. Well, if the raft floated in fresh water, it had to have a density less than 1.00. Any number less than 1.00 is definitely less than 1.10!! (Mathematically, that property is called "transitivity of inequality": if M < N and N < P, then we know M < P.) Therefore, buoyancy in freshwater would be a strong guarantee of buoyancy in salt water. This is why (C) strengthens the argument.

Further real-life connections to (C): I don't know whether you have noticed that it's slightly easier to float and bob in ocean water than it is in, say, a fresh water river or lake. The Dead Sea on the Israel/Jordan border has a particularly high salt content, so much that nothing can live in that water, and correspondingly, a particularly high density, which makes floating almost effortless.

For the GMAT CR, you don't need an expert level of knowledge, but you need to have a familiarity with what I would call the basic facts of the world: basic physical science, basic economics, basic facts about world's political & judicial systems, etc. etc. See:
GMAT Critical Reasoning and Outside Knowledge

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike ,

Thanks for the prompt reply .
I am very through in my understanding of this question now .
I have also gone through the blog that you mentioned in the post it was of great help .

Regards,
Arvind
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Re: The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2018, 21:09
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hellosanthosh2k2, arvind910619, viv007
Using POE method, you can eliminate all wrong answer.s
Why specifically C is correct and relating to the argument?
Here, we do not need to use the physics principle of Archimedes about the floating. "compact design before the compressed air" is the key word that connects directly with "Dense" in C.

Give kudos if you like my explanation. Thanks.
Re: The SeaCare corporation is developing a new emergency inflatable raft &nbs [#permalink] 27 Jan 2018, 21:09
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