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The tourism commission has conducted surveys of hotels in the most

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Re: The tourism commission has conducted surveys of hotels in the most  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2019, 08:32
soumya170293 wrote:
E looks more concise and better contender to be the potential answer .

But I 've a doubt

the number of guests - who express /es -- Because 'The number of' is always singular opposed to ' A number of ' which is always plural .

Hi soumya170293, whether it should be express or expresses, depends on what who is modifying: if who is modifying guests, then the correct verb is express; if who is modifying the number, then the correct verb is expresses.

From the intended meaning of the sentence, it is quite clear that the ultimate goal of is to reduce the number of guests who express overall dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service.

So, reduce which guests?

Answer: Those who express overall dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service.

Hence, who is intended to modify guests. Hence, the correct verb is express.
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New post 21 Jan 2020, 23:59
The tourism commission has conducted surveys of hotels in the most popular resorts, with the ultimate goal of reducing the guests who end up expressing overall dissatisfaction with the service in the hotels.

(A) with the ultimate goal of reducing the guests who end up expressing overall dissatisfaction with the service in the hotels

(B) with the goal to ultimately reduce the number of guests who end up expressing overall dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service

(C) ultimately with the goal to reduce expressions of overall dissatisfaction by the guests with the hotel service

(D) in an ultimate attempt to reduce the number of guests that ends up expressing overall dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service

(E) with the ultimate goal of reducing the number of guests who express overall dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service


The goal is to reduce the number of guests. Not the guests themselves. A is incorrect.

'ultimately reduce the number of guests' distorts the original meaning which tries to say that the goal is ultimate. Eliminate B.

Goal is not to reduce expressions. 'with the hotel service' should be placed next to overall dissatisfaction. 'ultimately with goal' is not same as 'ultimate goal' Eliminate C.

that refers to guests so should have plural verb end and not 'ends'. Even if you think that refers to number then it conveys illogical meaning since the number cannot express dissatisfaction. 'ultimate attempt' means final attempt. We want to say the goal is ultimate. Eliminate D.

E does not make the above mistakes. who correctly refers to guests and correct plural verb 'express' is used. Correct answer.
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New post 01 May 2020, 04:38
Hi experts,

If I have understood correctly, using with as a conjunction or with + participle phrase to describe an action is in poor style according to GMAT. But the OA does just that.

Going along with the same approach, isn't C a right choice. Why is it wrong to reduce the level of dissatisfaction instead of the number of guests who are feeling dissatisfied.

Have I got this wrong?

Please help.
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New post 16 May 2020, 13:12
Quote:
Hi experts,

If I have understood correctly, using with as a conjunction or with + participle phrase to describe an action is in poor style according to GMAT. But the OA does just that.

Going along with the same approach, isn't C a right choice. Why is it wrong to reduce the level of dissatisfaction instead of the number of guests who are feeling dissatisfied.

Have I got this wrong?

Please help.


I also thought about it. I guess the easiest way to eliminate choice (C) is the modifier placement such as:
-expressions of overall dissatisfaction by the guests with the hotel service:
1) I am not sure 'by' is the right preposition here. 'by the guests' does not sound good. Maybe 'from' is better?
2) 'the guests with the hotel service' is a complete mess. How can a guest have a hotel service?
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Re: The tourism commission has conducted surveys of hotels in the most  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2020, 12:16
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AkashM wrote:
Hi experts,

If I have understood correctly, using with as a conjunction or with + participle phrase to describe an action is in poor style according to GMAT. But the OA does just that.

Going along with the same approach, isn't C a right choice. Why is it wrong to reduce the level of dissatisfaction instead of the number of guests who are feeling dissatisfied.

Have I got this wrong?

Please help.

Sadly, as I say all the time, there are very few concrete, black and white grammar "rules" that you can blindly apply to GMAT SC. Just because ", with..." doesn't work in some incorrect answer choices doesn't mean that it's always wrong. And if you wanted to eliminate (E) JUST because it uses ", with", you'd have to eliminate (C) as well -- it also uses a ", with" construction (the addition of the modifier "ultimately" doesn't change the function of the "with").

Reducing the LEVEL of dissatisfaction among guests would make some sense... but that's not what we have in (C). Instead, we have, "... the goal to reduce expressions of overall dissatisfaction by the guests with the hotel service."

  • You can reduce a LEVEL of dissatisfaction, but it's illogical to reduce the "expressions" themselves. We don't have that problem in choice (E), so that's one vote against (C).
  • Also, "... by the guests with the hotel service" is a bit confusing -- "with the hotel service" seems like it could modify "guests" here, and that wouldn't make any sense. The intended meaning is clearer in choice (E).
  • Lastly, "ultimately with the goal" modifies the preceding clause ("The tourism commission has conducted surveys..."). But what would it mean to "conduct ultimately"? Does it mean it's the final time they'll ever conduct a survey? It's far more logical for "ultimate" to describe the "goal."

So if you compare all the logical problems in (C), to the more coherent meaning in (E), it's clear that (E) is our winner.

I hope that helps!
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New post 06 Jul 2020, 12:09
1
goal to is unidiomatic. The correct expression is goal of.
Ultimately - the use of ultimately changes the intended meaning if it incorrectly modifies reduce
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New post 07 Jul 2020, 10:44
B vs E:
1. The usage of noun modifier, which modifies "survey" is correct in both options
2. Ultimately reduce vs ultimate goal : Now let's be critical. What do you mean by "ultimately reduce" ? Ultimately is an adverb that modifies reduce. It says " Oh, so the goal is to reduce the number of guests who ..... in an "ultimate manner" . So how many ways of reducing are possible? Besides , what is meant by "to reduce in an ultimate way/manner?" Even if such possibilities exist, the meaning of the sentence is changed. Any company would have a final end point, a goal in mind that would give the CEO satisfaction, or a sense of accomplishment. So here , "ultimate goal " is apt.
Hope this helps!
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New post 11 Jul 2020, 01:34
does "expressing" in option "a" act as a gerund? Which noun does it modify? also, since there is no "to be" verb it can't act as a verb
It seems expressing is acting like a verb, can we eliminate a on basis of this fact?
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New post 11 Jul 2020, 01:37
AbdurRakib wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review, 2017

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 740
Page: 696

The tourism commission has conducted surveys of hotels in the most popular resorts, with the ultimate goal of reducing the guests who end up expressing overall dissatisfaction with the service in the hotels.

(A) with the ultimate goal of reducing the guests who end up expressing overall dissatisfaction with the service in the hotels

(B) with the goal to ultimately reduce the number of guests who end up expressing overall dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service

(C) ultimately with the goal to reduce expressions of overall dissatisfaction by the guests with the hotel service

(D) in an ultimate attempt to reduce the number of guests that ends up expressing overall dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service

(E) with the ultimate goal of reducing the number of guests who express overall dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service

comma + with (adverbial modifier) = LINK 1 & LINK 2 & LINK 3 & LINK 4 & LINK 5 & LINK 6 & LINK 7 & LINK 8

Tourism Commission

(A) Meaning (reducing the guests)

(B) Modifier / Meaning (ultimately); Idiom (goal to reduce)

(C) Modifier (with the hotel service); Idiom (goal to reduce)

(D) Modifier / Meaning (ultimate); Subject-Verb (guests that ends up)

(E) CORRECT


First glance

Most of the choices begin with prepositions (with, in); in the case of choice (C), just one word (ultimately) precedes a preposition (with). The problem is testing something related to Modifiers.

Issues

(1) Meaning: reducing the guests

Modifier / Meaning: ultimately; ultimate

The original sentence says that the commission conducted surveys in order to reduce the guests. Literally, this means to reduce the size of the guests. Perhaps they’ve invented an incredible shrinking ray gun?

Probably not—this meaning is illogical. Presumably, the goal was to reduce the number of guests or the number of complaints. Eliminate choice (A) for faulty meaning.

While examining the first issue, you might spot another one. The original sentence describes the ultimate goal of the surveys. Other choices move this word around or change the form to ultimate. Check them for proper placement and meaning.

(A) with the ultimate goal

(B) with the goal to ultimately reduce

(C) ultimately with the goal

(D) in an ultimate attempt

(E) with the ultimate goal

An ultimate goal is a decisive or final goal; this meaning makes logical sense for the sentence. Nothing indicates, however, that this is the final attempt to achieve the goal; why wouldn't the commission be able to keep trying? Eliminate (D) for an unlikely meaning.

Choice (B) changes the form to ultimately (an adverb) and places it with the verb to reduce. The goal is not to finally reduce the number of guests. Rather, the surveys have a final or ultimate goal. Eliminate choice (B).

(2) Idiom: goal to reduce

Two choices say with the goal of reducing, while two others say with the goal to reduce. (The fifth removes this structure entirely.) Eliminate choices (B) and (C).

The correct idiom is with the goal of (doing something).

(3) Modifier: with the hotel service

Four of the choices talk about dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service (or with the service in hotels). In choice (C), though, the modifier moves:

overall dissatisfaction by the guests with the hotel service

Prepositional phrases can modify nouns or verbs. If a prepositional phrase begins just after a noun, the general expectation is that it is modifying that noun. In this case, then, with the hotel service would be modifying guests—but the point of the sentence is not to discuss the guests with the hotel service. All of the relevant guests stayed in hotels. The point is to call out those guests who are dissatisfied with the hotel service. Eliminate answer (C) for faulty modifier placement leading to illogical meaning.

(4) Subject-Verb: guests that ends up

Choice (D) uses the construction reduce the number of guests that ends up expressing … dissatisfaction. The plural guests express dissatisfaction, so they end up expressing dissatisfaction. The singular verb ends does not match with the plural subject guests. Eliminate choice (D).

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (E) conveys a logical meaning throughout: the surveys have an ultimate, or final, goal; the goal is to reduce the number of guests; those guests express … dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service.


does "expressing" in option "a" act as a gerund? Which noun does it modify? also, since there is no "to be" verb it can't act as a verb
It seems expressing is acting like a verb, can we eliminate a on basis of this fact?
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New post 12 Jul 2020, 05:45
vivek6199 wrote:
In A, reducing the guests implying the GUESTS are to be made smaller in size.
This meaning is nonsensical.
Eliminate A.

Generally, an infinitive modifier serves to express INTENT.
B and C: with the goal to reduce
Here, the infinite modifier in red implies that the goal is intended TO REDUCE something.
This meaning is nonsensical: a goal cannot be used to reduce something.
Eliminate B and C.

D: the number...that ends up ends up expressing dissatisfaction
Here, the portions in red imply that an actual number -- 100, 1000, etc. -- is EXPRESSING dissatisfaction.
This meaning is nonsensical.
Eliminate D.


Posted by
GMATGuruNY


Love this explanation about this idiom, making it a lot easier to digest and internalize!
Quote:
"with the goal to reduce"
Here, the infinite modifier in red implies that the goal is intended TO REDUCE something.
This meaning is nonsensical: a goal cannot be used to reduce something.

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New post 15 Jul 2020, 00:34
Experts, please help.

Lots of great explanations, however there is something that I need to understand.

Goal already means “purpose” , so using “goal” and “to” together creates redundancy?

The original sentence would mean the same if I say — “the tourism commission conducted surveys to reduce the number of guests who express overall dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service.”

Also, shouldn’t it be hotels’ services(plural of service) ??

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New post 15 Jul 2020, 02:44
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INSEADIESE wrote:
Experts, please help.

Lots of great explanations, however there is something that I need to understand.

Goal already means “purpose” , so using “goal” and “to” together creates redundancy?

The original sentence would mean the same if I say — “the tourism commission conducted surveys to reduce the number of guests who express overall dissatisfaction with the hotels’ service.”

Also, shouldn’t it be hotels’ services(plural of service) ??

AjiteshArun GMATNinja
Hi INSEADIESE,

1. This is not that to (to has a number of uses, and it does not always mean "in order to"). Here are a couple of quick examples in which goal is immediately followed by to:
a. It was his goal to hit six boundaries in one over. ← "To hit six boundaries in one over was his goal"
b. ... communicate their goal to the rest of the company during... ← "communicate X to Y"

2. This particular service is a non-count noun. If we were looking at ~types of work, we could certainly go with services ("the company offers multiple services"), but when we're looking at just "serving" customers (esp. hospitality/retail), service is non-count.
c. The service at the restaurant was great! ← This is the kind of service that we are looking at in this question.
d. The services at the restaurant were great! ← This is a completely different service.
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