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Tough RC : Before there were books, before, even,

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Tough RC : Before there were books, before, even,  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Nov 2018, 03:20
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 24 sessions

33% (03:12) correct 67% (03:04) wrong

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Question 2
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B
C
D
E

based on 25 sessions

72% (01:32) correct 28% (01:50) wrong

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Question 3
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C
D
E

based on 24 sessions

21% (01:14) correct 79% (01:33) wrong

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Before there were books, before, even, there was the written word in civilization, there must surely have been stories told. Relating stories to one another is a unique way that we, as humans, communicate thoughts, needs, desires, and instruction. Whether it be the true story of what happened on the way to the well yesterday-a story meant to instruct about the latest water situations-or a dramatic retelling of a long-ago battle-a cautionary tale meant to warn against unnecessary warfare-stories have the unique ability to bring home information and instruct in a way a mere recitation of the facts cannot.

The Tale, the Parable, and the Fable are all common and popular modes of conveying instruction-each being distinguished by its own special characteristics. The true Fable, if it rises to its high requirements, ever aims at one great end and purpose: the representation of human motive, and the improvement of human conduct, and yet it so conceals its design under the disguise of fictitious characters, by clothing with speech the animals of the field, the birds of the air, the trees of the wood, or the beasts of the forest, that the reader receives the advice without perceiving the presence of the adviser. Thus the superiority of the counsellor, which often renders counsel unpalatable, is kept out of view, and the lesson comes with the greater acceptance when the reader is led, unconsciously to himself, to have his sympathies enlisted on behalf of what is pure, honourable, and praiseworthy, and to have his indignation excited against what is low, ignoble, and unworthy.

The true fabulist, therefore, is charged with a most important function. He is neither a narrator, nor an allegorist, he is a great teacher, a corrector of morals, a censor of vice, and a commender of virtue. In this consists the superiority of the Fable over the Tale or the Parable. The fabulist is to create a laugh, but yet, under a merry guise, to convey instruction. Phaedrus, the great imitator of Aesop, plainly indicates this double purpose to be the true office of the writer of fables.

The Fable partly agrees with, and partly differs from the Tale and the Parable. It will contain, like the Tale, a short but real narrative; it will seek, like the Parable, to convey a
hidden meaning, not so much by the use of language, as by the skilful introduction of fictitious characters; and yet unlike to either Tale or Parable, it will ever keep in view, as
its high prerogative, and inseparable attribute, the great purpose of instruction, and will necessarily seek to inculcate some moral maxim, social duty, or political truth.

The Tale consists simply of the narration of a story either founded on facts, or created solely by the imagination, and not necessarily associated with the teaching of any moral
lesson. The Parable is the designed use of language purposely intended to convey a hidden and secret meaning other than that contained in the words themselves; and which may or may not bear a special reference to the hearer, or reader.

1) The passage suggests that the fable is superior to the parable and the tale for none of the following reasons EXCEPT:
I. the fable contains a moral lesson within its narrative.
II. the parable‘s message may be too enigmatic for a reader to comprehend.
III. the tale is a chronicle of recent historical events.
a) I only
b) I and II
c) II and III
d) I, II, and III
e) None of the above



2) According to the passage, which of the following is NOT a requirement for a narrative text to be classified as a fable?
a) Use of fictional characters, such as personified animals and natural objects
b) Inclusion of social, moral, or political references relevant to contemporary readers
c) Constant awareness of and attention to a particular instructional goal
d) Figurative or poetic language to demonstrate the author‘s creative talent
e) Every fable must have a moral at the end



3) Which of the following best characterizes the claim that the fabulist is a ―great teacher, a corrector of morals, acensor of vice, and a commender of virtue
a) It is an analysis of the importance of the fabulist‘s role in society.
b) It is a conclusion that fabulists should be honoured above writers of parables or tales.
c) It is appreciation for the fabulist‘s ability to multitask.
d) It advocates increased honour and respect for the fabulist.
e) It suggests that more and more people should become fabulists



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Re: Tough RC : Before there were books, before, even,  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Nov 2018, 16:54
1
doomedcat wrote:
Before there were books, before, even, there was the written word in civilization, there must surely have been stories told. Relating stories to one another is a unique way that we, as humans, communicate thoughts, needs, desires, and instruction. Whether it be the true story of what happened on the way to the well yesterday-a story meant to instruct about the latest water situations-or a dramatic retelling of a long-ago battle-a cautionary tale meant to warn against unnecessary warfare-stories have the unique ability to bring home information and instruct in a way a mere recitation of the facts cannot.

The Tale, the Parable, and the Fable are all common and popular modes of conveying instruction-each being distinguished by its own special characteristics. The true Fable, if it rises to its high requirements, ever aims at one great end and purpose: the representation of human motive, and the improvement of human conduct, and yet it so conceals its design under the disguise of fictitious characters, by clothing with speech the animals of the field, the birds of the air, the trees of the wood, or the beasts of the forest, that the reader receives the advice without perceiving the presence of the adviser. Thus the superiority of the counsellor, which often renders counsel unpalatable, is kept out of view, and the lesson comes with the greater acceptance when the reader is led, unconsciously to himself, to have his sympathies enlisted on behalf of what is pure, honourable, and praiseworthy, and to have his indignation excited against what is low, ignoble, and unworthy.

The true fabulist, therefore, is charged with a most important function. He is neither a narrator, nor an allegorist, he is a great teacher, a corrector of morals, a censor of vice, and a commender of virtue. In this consists the superiority of the Fable over the Tale or the Parable. The fabulist is to create a laugh, but yet, under a merry guise, to convey instruction. Phaedrus, the great imitator of Aesop, plainly indicates this double purpose to be the true office of the writer of fables.

The Fable partly agrees with, and partly differs from the Tale and the Parable. It will contain, like the Tale, a short but real narrative; it will seek, like the Parable, to convey a
hidden meaning, not so much by the use of language, as by the skilful introduction of fictitious characters; and yet unlike to either Tale or Parable, it will ever keep in view, as
its high prerogative, and inseparable attribute, the great purpose of instruction, and will necessarily seek to inculcate some moral maxim, social duty, or political truth.

The Tale consists simply of the narration of a story either founded on facts, or created solely by the imagination, and not necessarily associated with the teaching of any moral
lesson. The Parable is the designed use of language purposely intended to convey a hidden and secret meaning other than that contained in the words themselves; and which may or may not bear a special reference to the hearer, or reader.

1) The passage suggests that the fable is superior to the parable and the tale for none of the following reasons EXCEPT:
I. the fable contains a moral lesson within its narrative.
II. the parable‘s message may be too enigmatic for a reader to comprehend.
III. the tale is a chronicle of recent historical events.
a) I only
b) I and II
c) II and III
d) I, II, and III
e) None of the above



2) According to the passage, which of the following is NOT a requirement for a narrative text to be classified as a fable?
a) Use of fictional characters, such as personified animals and natural objects
b) Inclusion of social, moral, or political references relevant to contemporary readers
c) Constant awareness of and attention to a particular instructional goal
d) Figurative or poetic language to demonstrate the author‘s creative talent
e) Every fable must have a moral at the end



3) Which of the following best characterizes the claim that the fabulist is a ―great teacher, a corrector of morals, acensor of vice, and a commender of virtue
a) It is an analysis of the importance of the fabulist‘s role in society.
b) It is a conclusion that fabulists should be honoured above writers of parables or tales.
c) It is appreciation for the fabulist‘s ability to multitask.
d) It advocates increased honour and respect for the fabulist.
e) It suggests that more and more people should become fabulists





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Re: Tough RC : Before there were books, before, even, &nbs [#permalink] 04 Nov 2018, 16:54
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