GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 10 Dec 2018, 22:55

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in December
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
2526272829301
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
303112345
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT Prep Hour

     December 11, 2018

     December 11, 2018

     09:00 PM EST

     10:00 PM EST

    Strategies and techniques for approaching featured GMAT topics. December 11 at 9 PM EST.
  • Free lesson on number properties

     December 10, 2018

     December 10, 2018

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    Practice the one most important Quant section - Integer properties, and rapidly improve your skills.

Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4547
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 30 Aug 2018, 23:41
1
13
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

61% (01:33) correct 39% (01:41) wrong based on 571 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering is the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated; the complete lack of harmony and apparent randomness of the noise means the human vocal chords are completely incapable of reproducing these sounds.


(A) the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated

(B) similar to an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet

(C) like singing like a sick parakeet as an intoxicated person

(D) the same as an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet

(E) like the intoxicated person is singing like a sick parakeet

_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509


Originally posted by daagh on 08 Sep 2015, 05:52.
Last edited by Bunuel on 30 Aug 2018, 23:41, edited 3 times in total.
Most Helpful Community Reply
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 03 Oct 2014
Posts: 132
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Technology
GMAT 1: 720 Q48 V40
WE: Engineering (Aerospace and Defense)
Reviews Badge
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Sep 2015, 07:07
4
1
daagh wrote:
Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering is the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated; the complete lack of harmony and apparent randomness of the noise means the human vocal chords are completely incapable of reproducing these sounds.

(A) the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated

(B) similar to an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet

(C) like singing like a sick parakeet as an intoxicated person

(D) the same as an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet

(E) like the intoxicated person is singing like a sick parakeet


OA after 3 responses



B - Comparing an activity to a person...Strike out

D - Same issue

E - Same issue

C - Like a sick parakreet - Like refers to noun (a person) can't be possible..


Only plausible - A
General Discussion
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 06 Mar 2015
Posts: 6
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Sep 2015, 06:01
IMO D
Since it is the only one showing correct parallelism.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4547
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Sep 2015, 08:11
1
This is a simple question from Manhattan Review. The OA is A;
The parallel structure is “trying to mimic” and “attempting to sing”.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 07 Dec 2009
Posts: 92
GMAT Date: 12-03-2014
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Sep 2015, 10:01
1
Clear A.

Hi Daagh, Can you please add the OA to the question.

Many Thanks
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 28 Jan 2017
Posts: 16
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Feb 2017, 15:13
Like is used when you compare one person with other. When you have to compare qualities , better use as ... as. So, Options B D E are out. Option C is awkward.

Option A looks better compare to other. What is the OA?

Sent from my XT1068 using GMAT Club Forum mobile app
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 29 Oct 2016
Posts: 225
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GMAT 1: 620 Q50 V24
GRE 1: Q167 V147
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Feb 2017, 19:25
3
1
vishalkumar4mba wrote:
Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering is the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated; the complete lack of harmony and apparent randomness of the noise means the human vocal chords are completely incapable of reproducing these sounds.

(A) the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated
(B) similar to an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet
(C) like singing like a sick parakeet as an intoxicated person
(D) the same as an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet
(E) like the intoxicated person is singing like a sick parakeet


Only option A makes a proper comparison : trying to mimic & attempting to sing
(A) correct
(B) Trying to mimic vs intoxicated person
(C) Trying to mimic vs singing
(D) Trying to mimic vs intoxicated person
(E) Trying to mimic vs intoxicated person
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 27 Nov 2016
Posts: 55
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, International Business
GPA: 2.71
WE: Consulting (Consulting)
Reviews Badge
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Feb 2017, 04:39
sleepynut wrote:
vishalkumar4mba wrote:
Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering is the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated; the complete lack of harmony and apparent randomness of the noise means the human vocal chords are completely incapable of reproducing these sounds.

(A) the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated
(B) similar to an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet
(C) like singing like a sick parakeet as an intoxicated person
(D) the same as an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet
(E) like the intoxicated person is singing like a sick parakeet


Only option A makes a proper comparison : trying to mimic & attempting to sing
(A) correct
(B) Trying to mimic vs intoxicated person
(C) Trying to mimic vs singing
(D) Trying to mimic vs intoxicated person
(E) Trying to mimic vs intoxicated person


If option A is correct , can you please explain "when one is intoxicated" modifies which part of sentence ???
Second, when is used generally when we refer to actual time for eg: When India got independence (1947) . Can you explain this part as well ?

Thanks !!
Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 18 Sep 2014
Posts: 1120
Location: India
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Feb 2017, 09:27
1
Top Contributor
vishalkumar4mba wrote:
sleepynut wrote:
vishalkumar4mba wrote:
Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering is the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated; the complete lack of harmony and apparent randomness of the noise means the human vocal chords are completely incapable of reproducing these sounds.

(A) the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated
(B) similar to an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet
(C) like singing like a sick parakeet as an intoxicated person
(D) the same as an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet
(E) like the intoxicated person is singing like a sick parakeet


If option A is correct , can you please explain "when one is intoxicated" modifies which part of sentence ???
Second, when is used generally when we refer to actual time for eg: When India got independence (1947) . Can you explain this part as well ?

Thanks !!


I believe "when one is intoxicated" modifies human being. It is human being who trying to mimic dophin and parakeet.
You are right regarding the use of when. It refers to time period.
The pronoun when can be used to modify a noun event or time, such as period, age, 1987 or decade.
So when is perfectly alright.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 18 Sep 2014
Posts: 1120
Location: India
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Feb 2017, 10:27
Top Contributor
vishalkumar4mba wrote:
Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering is the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated; the complete lack of harmony and apparent randomness of the noise means the human vocal chords are completely incapable of reproducing these sounds.

(A) the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated
(B) similar to an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet
(C) like singing like a sick parakeet as an intoxicated person
(D) the same as an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet
(E) like the intoxicated person is singing like a sick parakeet


Here we are trying to do compare two tasks.
    trying to mimic and
    trying to sing like parakeet when we are intoxicated

Options B and E can be incorrect as trying to do sth can never be compared to a person.

Coming to D, the second non underlined sentence gives us a hint that person cannot sing like parrot or dolphin due to some reasons. It can be just an attempt so D changes the intended meaning of the sentence and also contains the same error as in above option B and E.

structure of C, like..like........as a person is totally absurd.

Although looks wordy, only option A conveys the intended meaning thru comparison. :)
Board of Directors
User avatar
P
Joined: 17 Jul 2014
Posts: 2621
Location: United States (IL)
Concentration: Finance, Economics
GMAT 1: 650 Q49 V30
GPA: 3.92
WE: General Management (Transportation)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Apr 2017, 14:29
but how is this correct?
"to sing like a sick parakeet"
we know that like is correct in comparison only when we compare nouns...here...we compare actions...
Verbal Forum Moderator
avatar
B
Joined: 13 Feb 2015
Posts: 382
Premium Member
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Apr 2017, 18:33
Merged topics. Please, search before posting questions!
_________________

Please Read: Verbal Posting Rules

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 19 Aug 2015
Posts: 92
Location: India
GMAT 1: 650 Q49 V30
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 May 2017, 05:03
What does "one" refer to in A? Apart from this, A looks correct?. I rejected A only because of "one"
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 03 Apr 2015
Posts: 185
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2017, 07:19
daagh wrote:
This is a simple question from Manhattan Review. The OA is A;
The parallel structure is “trying to mimic” and “attempting to sing”.

sir what will be the take away
i crossed A just because use of when which generally follows time period
sir could you please elaborate
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4547
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2017, 10:21
Top Contributor
oishik2910
Well! the question is one of parallelism and comparisons. However, if you ask me, I will say even the parallelism aspect is enough to expose the correct answer.
Since 'trying' a gerund followed by an infinitive 'to mimic' is not underlined, it has to be matched with a similar phrase on the other side; 'attempting to sing' is its perfect foil as seen in A. you can see that none of the other choices is maintaining this gerund + infinitive parallelism. Therefore, why would I even bother about those choices anyway?
One last word---if you are thorough with your fundamentals, you will be the Usain Bolt of GMAT
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 03 Apr 2015
Posts: 185
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jul 2017, 09:01
daagh wrote:
oishik2910
Well! the question is one of parallelism and comparisons. However, if you ask me, I will say even the parallelism aspect is enough to expose the correct answer.
Since 'trying' a gerund followed by an infinitive 'to mimic' is not underlined, it has to be matched with a similar phrase on the other side; 'attempting to sing' is its perfect foil as seen in A. you can see that none of the other choices is maintaining this gerund + infinitive parallelism. Therefore, why would I even bother about those choices anyway?
One last word---if you are thorough with your fundamentals, you will be the Usain Bolt of GMAT


thank you sir got the query
my take way will be dont be too quick to eliminate read options carefully
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 51073
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Aug 2018, 23:41
daagh wrote:
Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering is the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated; the complete lack of harmony and apparent randomness of the noise means the human vocal chords are completely incapable of reproducing these sounds.


(A) the same as attempting to sing like a sick parakeet when one is intoxicated

(B) similar to an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet

(C) like singing like a sick parakeet as an intoxicated person

(D) the same as an intoxicated person singing like a sick parakeet

(E) like the intoxicated person is singing like a sick parakeet


MANHATTAN REVIEW OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:



This question is quite tricky. It involves parallel structure. You have to look carefully to figure out what form the comparison takes. The comparison is not one of similarity, it is one of equality. Saying x is y is quite different from saying x is like y or x is similar to y. Choices B, C and E all change the fundamental underlying concept of the sentence. Choice D disrupts the parallel structure. The parallel structure is “trying to mimic” and “attempting to sing”. Choice A is the correct answer.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

GMAT Club Bot
Re: Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering &nbs [#permalink] 30 Aug 2018, 23:41
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Trying to mimic some of the pitch variations of a dolphin chattering

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.