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Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!

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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2015, 08:21
website says 5 pm EDT. I'd imagine the calls would be made earlier. Pin drop silence so far.
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2015, 10:36
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Hey guys, received a call a few hours ago! I'm going to Hanover!
Good luck to all of you waiting!
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2015, 10:38
e4g wrote:
Hey guys, received a call a few hours ago! I'm going to Hanover!
Good luck to all of you waiting!


Congrats!

Where you a R3 or WL?
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2015, 10:46
e4g wrote:
Hey guys, received a call a few hours ago! I'm going to Hanover!
Good luck to all of you waiting!


Congratulations..
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Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2015, 10:48
kabayero14 wrote:
e4g wrote:
Hey guys, received a call a few hours ago! I'm going to Hanover!
Good luck to all of you waiting!


Congrats!

Where you a R3 or WL?


Thank you!
I applied in r3.
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2015, 12:13
Hey guys, I just received a call from the director of Admissions! I'm so stoked to head out to Hanover. Best of luck to everyone else!
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2015, 21:38
I was waitlisted.
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A Glimpse into How Tuck Celebrates Diversity: K-Pop Style  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2015, 13:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: A Glimpse into How Tuck Celebrates Diversity: K-Pop Style
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By Sara Mcguigan T'16

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Sara grew up the first half of her life in Oakland, California and the second in Plainsboro, NJ. She graduated from the United States Coast Guard Academy in 2008 and spent six years as a Commissioned Officer in the United States Coast Guard. Sara is now a 2016 MBA Candidate at the Tuck School of Business.

Tuck draws students from all over the world, and boasts a robust 35 percent of international students for each class. For these students, choosing a business school in Hanover, NH was a huge commitment, and probably as distant of a location as they could have chosen. At Tuck, the goal is to integrate the international community in such a manner where each student truly finds a home away from home, and fosters an environment that celebrates these different cultures.

 

As a student, expanding my network of friends to include those from all over the world will be one of my most cherished take-aways from the business school experience. Each international club is given the opportunity to put on a school-wide event (party) to not only celebrate their culture, but involve the entire community to interact, learn, and be a part of that specific cultural experience. Being half Korean, I am very proud of the influences Image
that my ethnicity has had in my upbringing, balancing both traditional Korean customs with American. Intuitively, I joined the Asia Business Club, which is one of the many student-run organizations at Tuck specifically designed to honor diversity. 

The Asia Business Club’s big event this year was Korea, Japan, China Night (KJC Night). The invite was extended to not just Tuckies and their families, but the entire Dartmouth community, to celebrate these three cultures with food, music, and performances. There were many wonderful acts, from Karaoke to Chinese fan dancing to a traditional Korean-dress fashion show—but as a participant, I am partial to the show’s finale, the K-Pop dance.

Nothing builds comradery and close friendships like bad dancers trying to learn choreography. Other than the gracious, talented dancers that took the time to teach us, the rest of us had no prior dance experience. But we all shared the same goal and determination to put in the hard work necessary to produce an incredible show and represent Korea to the best of our abilities. For a month we crammed two hour practices into our busy MBA schedules three times per week, often dancing late into the night.  But it was amazingly fun and it created a very strong bond in our friendships beyond expectation. The culminating point for me was not only seeing it all come to together—after so much preparation, thought, and practice—but to have drawn in the student body to love the performance as much as we did. The compliments, conversations, and comments that followed from students and faculty, even weeks after, was the goal: to have the Tuck community involved with and excited about Asian culture.  Further highlights quoted from the rest of the K-pop team:

“I loved being included even though I am not Korean, it exemplified the inclusive culture of Tuck to me. It also allowed me to practice some of my Korean language skills learned from a childhood of Tae Kwon Do.”

“One big take away or reconfirmation of what I already knew: with passionate and committed team members, you can achieve more than you could imagine. I had refused to dance for my entire life until KJC night, and I survived thanks to the team’s help and support.”

“It was not just Korean, Japanese, and Chinese that were involved in the show. Other nationalities were included as well, such as American, Indonesian, and Singaporean! We felt so welcomed and embraced by the K, J, & Cs—just like a big Tuck family!”

“From the stage, it was incredible to see crowd having so much fun dancing along with us and excited about K-pop.  I know that the entire KJC night left a lasting memory on everyone that attended, allowing everyone to interact with some of our countries’ traditions. 

After reading this, no need to feel left out, you can experience it here!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4gkhoewX1M

Overall, it is not about the K-Pop dance, it is beyond this.  Whether it was the audience or performers, it was about broadening horizons and having fun!  The inclusion and involvement of everyone, despite nationality, talents, or experiences, is what comprises the very special Tuck experience. 

K-Pop members include:

Amanda Grosse T’15

Daniel Lee T’15

Jae Seung Lee T’15

Daniel Kang D’15

Chun Ting, Khaw T’16

Julia Kim TP’16

Kevin Kim T’16

Sara McGuigan T’16

Dismas Widita T’16

Adam Yang T’16
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2015, 02:25
What about feedback sessions? Do they send invites or do we ask for it?
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2015, 03:41
kiera16 wrote:
What about feedback sessions? Do they send invites or do we ask for it?


I think you just send an email to the admissions office asking for a feedback session. I just did and im waiting for their response. will post in the forum once i hear back.
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Q&A: What You Need to Know about Careers at Tuck  [#permalink]

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New post 19 May 2015, 15:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Q&A: What You Need to Know about Careers at Tuck
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One of our responsibilities in the Admissions Office is to talk to prospective students about the diverse array of post-MBA job opportunities and how a multitude of Tuck resources will help you land the right one. Since this is such an important message, we thought we’d take a step back this week and go directly to the source by interviewing Stephen Pidgeon Associate Director in the Career Development Office at Tuck.

 

Hi Stephen! Can you tell the Tuck 360 readers little bit about yourself?

Stephen:  Hi! I’m Associate Director in the Career Development Office at Tuck. I started out my career in film and television, then came to Tuck as an MBA student back in 2005. After graduating, I went to McKinsey where I worked for 4 years as a consultant, and now I’m back at Tuck in Career Services, focusing on media, consulting, and healthcare (a lot of my client work at McKinsey was in Healthcare). In my role I counsel and coach students and also work closely with recruiters.

Which pre-MBA careers make good foundations for MBA admission and post-MBA success?

Stephen:  Tuck admits students from a large variety of backgrounds and industries; business, medicine, engineering, entertainment, military etc.  Previous experience is just one aspect of what makes students successful.  Having defined goals, a strong work ethic, and a desire to be an active part of the community are also important.

For those who are less familiar with it, what is the CDO?

Stephen:  The CDO is responsible for helping you get your dream job. We divide up industries across our counselors, and each counselor worked in that industry. For instance, I cover consulting and I worked at McKinsey. My colleague Deirdre covers banking and she spent 20+ years on Wall St. at Lehman Brothers. We run formal classes on career skills, and we are also available at all times for counseling and coaching such as interview skills, case practice etc. In addition, we can be a conduit to the rest of Tuck in terms of getting alumni, faculty and other staff involved in helping you in your career search.  For instance, almost 90% of job acceptances were Tuck facilitated through on-campus recruiting, the alumni network, job postings on Tuck’s internal job board, faculty referrals, career trips and more.

It’s well-known that intense recruiting is a huge part of b-school.  Perhaps not as well-known, is the difference between on-campus and off-campus recruiting – aside from the obvious!  Could you explain?

Stephen:  Certain industries/companies are better suited for each.  One way or another, we will put you in touch with the person you’re looking for!

About half our students find their job through on-campus, and the other half through off-campus.

Briefly, on-campus recruiting usually involves companies that have a predictable and large-scale demand for MBAs, and includes consulting, banking, marketing, pharma, tech and many leadership programs and so on.

Tuck's on-campus recruitment takes place in the fall for second-year students and during the winter for first-year students. Tuck brings companies from a wide range of industries to Hanover to interview students for full-time and intern positions. The majority of on-campus recruiters participate in company briefings prior to the start of on-campus recruitment. Through briefings and other career development events you'll have uncommon access to the many companies that recruit here. To ensure that all students have equal opportunity to interview with their top companies, we require that every company recruiting at Tuck during the on-campus recruiting season reserve at least half its interview slots for assignment through a student bidding process. 

Off-campus recruiting works best for certain industries particularly where the demand for MBA talent is more ad-hoc, or the volume is too small to justify the expense of sending teams to campuses. Off campus can range from fairly formal, where companies post jobs and students apply to them, to informal, where the opportunity may arise out of a relationship the student builds with the recruiting company.

If you have a dream company or industry that doesn’t recruit on campus, we will find a way to put you in touch with them, whether it’s through a Tuck alum or one of our professional contacts.  In all, Tuck has active recruiting relationships with about 900 companies.

Can you elaborate on alumni involvement during recruiting?

Stephen:  Tuck’s alumni is probably its greatest and most distinctive asset. Tuck alumni span numerous geographical regions, industries and functions.  Furthermore, they are known for their dedication and sense of commitment to Tuck. Alumni will not only return your calls and emails, they will coach you through interviews, hand your resume to decision makers, and seek you out when opportunities cross their desk. Once at Tuck, you have access to our global alumni network, through which you can search for just the type of profile you want to connect with.

Even on-campus recruiting is very much led by alumni – they are the ones who week after week come to campus, make themselves available to students, coach them, and advocate for them within their respective companies.

Since Tuck is more remote than its peer schools, are recruiters hesitant to come to campus?

Stephen:  Not at all!  First and foremost, Tuck graduates make great employees so recruiters are willing to travel a bit to talk to them.  Secondly, the remote location actually works in our favor for two huge reasons; focus and access.  When recruiters come to Hanover, they’re here to talk to our students…and that’s it.  No running off to another meeting or jumping in the first available cab.  Additionally, while they’re at Tuck, students are offered unparalleled access to these industry leaders through small group dinners, lectures and information sessions.  

What resources are available for students switching careers or with a less defined plan of action?

Stephen:  The majority of Tuck students are career changers. We work closely with these students on an individual basis to come up with a job-search strategy aligned with the three variables that will drive change: geography, industry, and function. Our primary goal is to help students shift their ability to market themselves by supplementing prior experience with a range of new and relevant accomplishments; an independent study with a well-known professor, a consulting project, volunteer work, writing a case study, taking a leadership role in a student club, and choosing an internship that builds the most effective bridge. We also emphasize the importance of networking because, in the end, successful career switchers need to market themselves to prospective employers.

In general, Tuck has a number of programs designed to help you make the most of your job search. Sector Smarts sessions are lunchtime panels to guide you in making general decisions about which industry you wish to pursue. Company Briefings are short presentations by companies that will interview students at Tuck through our on-campus recruitment program, and Company Office Hours are one-on-one meetings with representatives from those same companies. Tuck's job postings are opportunities from companies interested in Tuck students who may not conduct interviews in Hanover. These programs, as well as the many other targeted and industry-specific activities held throughout the fall and winter, will supply you with the resources necessary to conduct your own, individualized job search.

How does Tuck’s collaborative environment (vs. those that are more competitive) affect the recruiting process? 

Stephen:  Tuck is well known amongst recruiters for having students who value collaboration and who score very highly on ‘soft skills’. These turn out to be some of the most important elements in hiring, especially as the candidate advances in their career. For many jobs, the first couple of years may lean heavily on the ‘hard skills’ that all MBA students excel in, but onward success as a manager and leader relies on the ability to influence and form deep, trust-based relationships.

In the end, will an MBA be worth the investment?

Stephen:  I think there will always be a debate about the value of an MBA, but for now the data for truly World class schools like Tuck show that the return is decidedly positive. The Class of 2014 had an average base salary of $117,860, and the even more important fact is that those students have given themselves a radically improved trajectory for the future.

When I was applying to b-school I remember making an Excel model of the costs and benefits. If anyone wants data to put into their model, they may find our employment report useful: 2014 Employment Report.

In addition, I have to say as a Tuck alum that the two years I spent here as a student were priceless –they were truly some of the most exciting and profound times of my life – so much so that I’m back here now!

You can read more Tuck 360 posts from the CDO here
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Faculty Spotlight: Professor Emily Blanchard  [#permalink]

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New post 20 May 2015, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Faculty Spotlight: Professor Emily Blanchard
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Emily Blanchard is an associate professor of business administration at Tuck. Her work centers on the economics and policy implications of globalization and has been published in leading economics journals, including the Journal of International Economics and the Review of Economics and Statistics. 

At Tuck, Blanchard teaches the second core economics course, Global Economics for Managers, as well as an elective research to practice seminar on Firms and International Economic Policy. Prior to joining the Tuck faculty, she was an assistant professor of economics at the University of Virginia, where she earned the “All University Teaching Award” in 2007. She holds an AB from Wellesley College and a PhD in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

What is your favorite maxim or proverb?

Warm heart, cool head.

What stimulates new research ideas?

Research is the process of asking and answering questions. The easy part is coming up with new questions, which bubble to the surface like a near-continuous spring as I read newspapers, engage with other scholars, and most of all challenge and build on my earlier research. The hard part is figuring out which questions are the most interesting, important, and feasibly answered.

What made you want to become a professor?

Like many young idealists, I decided in college that I wanted to save the world. I quickly realized that I would first need to understand how the world works before I could decide what should be done and thus what, exactly, I would need to do. I am still in step 1: trying to understand how the world works—in my case, focusing on the economics and politics of globalization.

If you were not a professor, what would you be doing?

Most days, I would answer diplomat or policy maker. But I have to admit that there are times I contemplate retreating to my gardens or opening a farm-to-table country inn and brewery. 

What is one thing that most people would be surprised to learn about you?

I am also Australian (G’day).

Best tip for success?

Live life on your own terms. Don’t be a jerk.

What are a few books you would recommend?

The Little Book of Economics: How the Economy Works in the Real World, by Greg Ip. This little gem (pun intended) is a quick, readable, eminently sensible handbook for understanding the big-picture economics of our day. Ip is one of the world's foremost economics journalists, with an incredible knack for translating turgid economic prose into clear, compact descriptions of how the world works. A great book for GEM (Global Economics for Managers) preparation.

A Country is Not a Company, by Paul Krugman. In this Harvard Business Review article-turned-mini-book, Krugman sounds a cheeky but clear-headed warning to us all: good economic policy for countries is not simply a scaled-up version of good business practice. Krugman clearly and concisely articulates the key differences between firms and countries in a set of examples and lessons that will be familiar to any Tuckie. 

Factory Man by Beth Macy. This is an engaging narrative about the rise and fall of the furniture industry in the southeastern US. The book offers a first hand account of shifting comparative advantage, trade policy, WTO law and disputes, domestic politics, and more. It’s a great read.

Lean In, by Sheryl Sandberg. Every manager, professional, and decent human being should read it.  (I'll admit that I was hesitant to take the time, but I am glad I did.)
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E-Ship Club: A Melting Pot of Entrepreneurial Skills and Resources  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2015, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: E-Ship Club: A Melting Pot of Entrepreneurial Skills and Resources
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By Apurva Sacheti T'16

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Apurva Sacheti is a T'16 and part of the Entrepreneurship Club at Tuck. Prior to Tuck, Apurva worked on two entrepreneurial ventures, in the quick service restaurant and e-learning sectors in India respectively. Apurva completed his bachelor of engineering in electronics and communication from Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra in 2009.

Have an idea? Searching for useful resources and well-wishers to get you kick started? The Entrepreneurship Club at Tuck strives to save the most valuable asset your startup has—time—by organizing informational and networking sessions, workshops, and useful resources that have proven to be useful to entrepreneurs at Tuck and beyond. Here are two ways you can leverage the E-ship club at Tuck:

Get into the entrepreneurship ecosystem.

E-ship club familiarizes entrepreneurial Tuckies to a number of opportunities and useful resources at Tuck and Dartmouth. Through the club, you can learn about which entrepreneurship courses at Tuck rock, how you can get access to seed funding on Dartmouth’s campus, and acquire information about global entrepreneurship competitions that will help you raise $$(!). Rob Thelen T’16 was working on his idea to create a more efficient way to share social and contact information. Becoming a part of the E-ship ecosystem early on, he learned about opportunities to gain seed funding and picked up $5,000 from the Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network. Rob is at the verge of launching the beta version of Fliqapp—his mobile application—soon!

Find the right people and skills.

Getting connected to like-minded people can help otherwise lone entrepreneurs seek advice, acquire a support group, and refine their ideas. Justin Gerrard T’16, founder of BAE, a dating application, says, “My classmates in the E-ship club provided me a support structure and network of confidants who gave me the drive and insights to launch my venture with confidence.”

The E-ship club, for many Tuckies like Justin, is a place to get connected—whether it’s to find your co-founder or find a helpful Tuckie with a useful skill that you might need. The E-ship Club endeavors to be a melting pot of people and resources that are valuable to a successful entrepreneurial ecosystem.

These are just two ways that the Club can help you work on your idea. Moreover, as part of the Club you also get the opportunity to mold its initiatives and bring new opportunities to entrepreneurially-minded Tuckies, so as to further the Club’s mission to help Tuckies succeed in the startup ecosystem, today and in the future.
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Business School Rankings by Industry - Top MBA Programs in Finance for  [#permalink]

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By Paul Lanzillotti, Amerasia Consulting Group
Today's blog post is going to be the first in a series that covers business school rankings. More specifically, it's Amerasia's attempt at ranking top MBA programs by industry and based on publicly available data. Our motivation for doing this is quite simple - business school rankings differ quite drastically from publication to publication. US News seems to be the most consistent and widely followed. After Businessweek ranked Fuqua at number one, they decided to change their methodology.  Whether the two are correlated is up for debate. John Byrne over at "Poets and Quants" covered the change quite extensively here.

Regardless, we've never felt completely comfortable with the rankings because (to our knowledge) the raw data that drives the rankings has never been fully disclosed. Yes, we do know that the methodology (ranking model) has been discussed on relevant websites, but it's a cursory explanation of the process in our opinion. Also our opinion - that the process is still very much a black box.  So we decided to start over and see what we could come up with.  Most importantly we started with the very numbers that the school's career centers are reporting via their respective employment reporting.

Our opinion is that recruiting (i.e. who's hiring) drives most programs "investment" decisions - in students, faculty, courses, experiential initiatives, alumni outreach, etc.  So to know to what a specific MBA program is really all about, you need to see the end result. In other words, what industries are hiring MBA graduates and from what schools?

Now before we get into the numbers, a few words of caution. What we have done is our first attempt at a numerically based ranking and its not perfect. It's based on our interpretation of the numbers put forth by top business schools. Let us explain. Most MBA career centers report employment numbers according to the categories that we use in our rankings. Some schools break "industry" categories into further sub-categories. Other programs - i.e. Michigan Ross - roll up their industry categories under more general headers like "manufacturing". So you could be a "marketing" professional but be within the manufacturing industry. To be forthright, it's a little confusing. (This is why we have decided to exclude Michigan Ross from some categories until we gather a little more insight into their self-reported numbers.)

None-the-less, we have tried to make sense of it all and to do this we did combine some categories in order to get an apples-to-apples comparison across schools. Clear as mud?  That being said, we welcome any constructive feedback you may have. Either post your comments below or email us at MBA@amerasiaconsulting.com.

Top MBA Programs in Finance (2015)
AKA THE RANKING OF BUSINESS SCHOOL PROGRAMS BY PERCENTAGE OF GRADUATES ENTERING THE FINANCE INDUSTRY IN 2014.
Our first ranking is "Finance" and Chicago Booth comes out on top.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="408"]Image
Top MBA Programs in Finance by Percentage of Graduates Entering the Industry (2015)[/caption]

 

Source Data:

We compiled this ranking based on information taken directly from the following MBA employment reports.
Haas

http://haas.berkeley.edu/groups/careercenter/reports/14-15ReportSummary.pdf

UCLA Anderson

http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/Documents/areas/adm/cmc/2014%20PARKER%20CMC%20Employment%20Report%2002.10.15%20LR.pdf

Stanford GSB
https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/documents/Stanford%20GSB%20Employment%20Report%202013-14.pdf

MIT Sloan

http://mitsloan.mit.edu/pdf/Class_of_2014-intern_employment_report.pdf

HBS

http://www.hbs.edu/recruiting/mba/data-and-statistics/recruitingreport/

http://www.hbs.edu/recruiting/mba/data-and-statistics/employment-statistics.html

Wharton

http://www.wharton.upenn.edu/mba/your-career/career-statistics.cfm

Kellogg

http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/career_employer/employment_statistics.aspx

Chicago Booth

http://www.chicagobooth.edu/employmentreport/

Columbia

https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/recruiters/employmentreport

NYU Stern
http://www.stern.nyu.edu/programs-admissions/full-time-mba/career/employment-statistics

Tuck

http://www.tuck.dartmouth.edu/careers/employment-statistics

Yale SOM

http://som.yale.edu/yale-som-connect/recruiting/employment-statistics

Michigan Ross

http://michiganross.umich.edu/our-community/recruiters

Duke Fuqua

http://www.fuqua.duke.edu/mba_recruiting/recruiting_duke/employment_statistics/

Cornell Johnson

http://www.johnson.cornell.edu/Career-Management/Employment-Report-for-Two-Year-MBAs

UVA Darden

http://www.darden.virginia.edu/recruiters-companies/hire-an-mba/employment-reports/
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Tuckies Head to UAE and Qatar for Global Insight Expedition  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2015, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuckies Head to UAE and Qatar for Global Insight Expedition
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By Raphael Bonacci T’15 and Hannah Cohen T’16

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Raphael is a second-year student at the Tuck School of Business. He worked in corporate development and investment banking in London and Paris. He has an MSc. in economics and finance from the University of Warwick and a BSc. from Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management.

 

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Hannah is a first year student at the Tuck School of Business. Hannah grew up in Boulder, Colorado. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and spent six years serving in the United States Marine Corps.

 

During spring break, we traveled to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Qatar with 25 fellow Tuckies on a trip led by Dirk Vandewalle, adjunct associate professor of business administration at Tuck and an associate professor of government at Dartmouth College. Our trip focused on sustainability in Gulf States, both economically and environmentally. We earned course credit by participating in this Global Insight Expedition (GIX), which counts toward our new Global Insight Requirement.

During our time in the Gulf, we explored three cities: Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the UAE and Doha in Qatar. We studied how these cities have taken their natural oil resources and strategic location, and have been working to transform their economies into more modern, diversified, cosmopolitan models.

In each city we were introduced to diverse businesses, from ports, to custom-free zones clustered by industry, to sovereign wealth funds. At each location, we attended presentations, often followed by Q&As. We were also able to visit Jumeirah Mosque in Dubai, Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi, the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, the Gold souk and the spice souk in Dubai, and go on a dhow cruise in the Persian Gulf.

The GIX was an eye opening experience in a region that we often hear of, but know so little about. During our trip, we discussed sustainability from different perspectives. We explored the role of Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC) in providing a business-friendly environment to attract businesses and international investors. We also discussed the role of sovereign wealth funds such as Abu Dhabi Investment Authority (ADIA) and Mubadala Development Company, in contributing to the long-term vision of a more diversified economy. Through seminars facilitated by Professor Vandewalle, we discussed the resilience of the Dubai economy over the 2008 financial crisis and whether the import of cheap labor through immigration is sustainable as well as the social challenges for both immigrants and the local population. Finally, we looked at the role of political stability in the UAE in a fairly unstable region, especially in the aftermath of the Arab Spring.

During the trip we interacted with professionals across sectors, which allowed us to better understand what it is like working in the Gulf States as well as the importance of personal relationships and trust. Our evening drinks with Tuck alumnus Francis Barel T’05, PayPal’s business development manager for the Middle East and North Africa gave us another perspective on some of the opportunities in the region.

Throughout the whole experience, Professor Vandewalle was able to guide our learning about not just the economy, but also the culture. It was an amazing opportunity to bond with Tuckies across classes and learn about how our education can serve us during our careers, as businesses continue to become more global.

Hear from other Tuckies on their Global Insight Expeditions: Georgia and Armenia, India, Israel, South Africa, Japan, and the Netherlands.

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Dubai, view from the Burj Khalifa, 124th floor, UAE

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Sheikh Zayed Mosque, Abu Dhabi, UAE

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Desert safari, UAE

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Doha, Qatar
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2015, 20:12
BlogBot wrote:
That being said, we welcome any constructive feedback you may have. Either post your comments below or email us at MBA@amerasiaconsulting.com.


Why is this in the Tuck thread?
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2015, 23:35
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Top MBA Programs in Technology (Updated 2015)  [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2015, 04:08
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By Paul Lanzillotti, Amerasia Consulting Group
OUR RANKING OF BUSINESS SCHOOL PROGRAMS BY PERCENTAGE OF GRADUATES ENTERING THE TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY IN 2014.
Today's blog post is a follow up to our Top MBA Programs in Finance ranking. It's also our continued attempt at ranking top MBA programs by industry and based on publicly available data.

UC Berkeley Haas comes out on top when it comes to sending graduates (as a percentage of all graduates in 2014) back into the technology industry. UCLA Anderson is second, but it's not even close. Hands down, Haas is the place to be if you're into technology and want to work for a related firm in the industry.
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BUYER BEWARE
Now before you get too far into interpreting the numbers, a few words of caution. What we have done is an inaugural attempt at a numerically based ranking and its not perfect. It's based on our interpretation of the numbers put forth by top business schools.
  • Let us explain. Most MBA career centers report employment numbers according to the categories that we use in our rankings. Some schools break "industry" categories into further sub-categories. Other programs - i.e. Michigan Ross - roll up their industry categories under more general headers like "manufacturing". So you could be a "marketing" professional but be within the manufacturing industry. To be forthright, it's a little confusing. (This is why we have decided to exclude Michigan Ross from some categories until we gather a little more insight into their self-reported numbers.)

None-the-less, we have tried to make sense of it all and to do this we did combine some categories in order to get an apples-to-apples comparison across schools. Clear as mud?
WHY WE USE EMPLOYMENT DATA TO RANK SCHOOLS
Our opinion is that recruiting (i.e. who's hiring) drives most programs "investment" decisions - in students, faculty, courses, experiential initiatives, alumni outreach, etc.  So to know to what a specific MBA program is really all about, you need to see the end result. In other words, what industries are hiring MBA graduates and from what schools?

We compiled this ranking based on information taken directly from the following MBA employment reports.

Haas http://haas.berkeley.edu/groups/careercenter/reports/14-15ReportSummary.pdf

UCLA Anderson http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/Documents/areas/adm/cmc/2014%20PARKER%20CMC%20Employment%20Report%2002.10.15%20LR.pdf

Stanford GSB https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/documents/Stanford%20GSB%20Employment%20Report%202013-14.pdf

MIT Sloan http://mitsloan.mit.edu/pdf/Class_of_2014-intern_employment_report.pdf

HBS http://www.hbs.edu/recruiting/mba/data-and-statistics/employment-statistics.html

Wharton http://www.wharton.upenn.edu/mba/your-career/career-statistics.cfm

Kellogg http://www.kellogg.northwestern.edu/career_employer/employment_statistics.aspx

Chicago Booth http://www.chicagobooth.edu/employmentreport/

Columbia https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/recruiters/employmentreport

NYU Stern http://www.stern.nyu.edu/programs-admissions/full-time-mba/career/employment-statistics

Tuck http://www.tuck.dartmouth.edu/careers/employment-statistics

Yale SOM http://som.yale.edu/yale-som-connect/recruiting/employment-statistics

Michigan Ross http://michiganross.umich.edu/our-community/recruiters

Duke Fuqua http://www.fuqua.duke.edu/mba_recruiting/recruiting_duke/employment_statistics/

Cornell Johnson http://www.johnson.cornell.edu/Career-Management/Employment-Report-for-Two-Year-MBAs

UVA Darden http://www.darden.virginia.edu/recruiters-companies/hire-an-mba/employment-reports/
FINALLY, DOES THE WORLD REALLY NEED ANOTHER BUSINESS SCHOOL RANKING?
We think "yes". We've never felt completely comfortable with the rankings because (to our knowledge) the raw data that drives the US News and Businessweek rankings has never been fully disclosed. So we decided to start over and with the very numbers that the school's career centers are reporting via their respective employment reporting.

That being said, we welcome any constructive feedback you may have. Email us at MBA@amerasiaconsulting.com with comments or if you're looking for an expert admissions consultant to lead you through the application process.
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Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2015, 10:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: It’s feedback season in the Admissions Office! Some thoughts…
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Greetings from Tuck’s Admissions Office! As you can imagine, admissions is a very cyclical process. During the spring and into the summer one of the things that keeps us busy is offering feedback to candidates who were not admitted. These applicants hope to either strengthen their candidacy while on the waitlist, or make themselves a better candidate for next year. While everyone is a little different – and often, the difficult truth is that the applicant pool was incredibly strong and our class size just can’t accommodate all of you awesome people – there are several areas for improvement that crop up again and again.

If you’re unsuccessful in your first attempt at admission into your dream MBA program, first take a few moments to assess your application. Self-aware applicants can usually identify the places in their application that are lacking. Then, read on for advice on eliminating, or at least minimizing, your weaknesses. 

My undergraduate GPA is low.

If possible, start by acknowledging this in the optional essay and providing an explanation (not an excuse!). Then, prove to us that you’re capable of handling an extremely rigorous, and quant heavy, curriculum. You can do this by scoring well on the GMAT (or GRE), taking additional, supplemental classes beyond your undergraduate degree and submitting well-written essays. It’s also important to clearly show us areas you do excel in; leadership, global experiences, community involvement, etc.

My GMAT score is lower than I think it should be.

First thing to keep in mind--a school’s average GMAT is just that, an average. One big advantage to this challenge versus a low GPA is that you can choose to retake the GMAT (or GRE), without consequence. After giving it your best effort, if you feel like there’s no amount of additional preparation that will improve your score, you’re still not out of the game. Again, you’ll need to prove you can handle a rigorous quantitative curriculum; high undergraduate GPA, supplemental courses with good scores (we often suggest financial accounting, statistics and microeconomics), etc. Finally, highlight areas of your background that shine.

I come from a non-traditional professional background.

Great! Tuck values unique experiences and individuals – many students decide to go to business school with the intention of switching careers and/or industries, so you won’t be alone. This in itself is not why you were unsuccessful. However, you do have to show us through your essays and interview how that unconventional experience will actually bring a different and positive perspective to your classmates. Also, while you may not have been crunching numbers, there’s a good chance you’ve been honing skills that will help you succeed in business; leadership traits, interpersonal skills, communication expertise, etc. Be sure to tell us the reality of the situation, not just what you think we want to hear. Is your previous work experience based on a passion of yours? Wonderful!  Let us know. 

Additionally, take some more time to reflect on these important questions – for you and for us. What are your long-term goals? How will an MBA help you achieve them? Why now? Why Tuck? Once you answered these, if your path still leads you to Tuck, your sincerity and passion will be evident.

I have very little global experience.

Like everything else, global experience is an important factor in your application, but certainly not the only one. You may have more global experience than you think. Have you worked or lived outside your home country? Have you visited for an extended period of time? Have you worked with global clients within your home country? Do you know a second language? Make sure to think broadly.

Or, maybe this is the perfect time to jump on that international opportunity you’ve been postponing!

I haven’t had substantial leadership experience.

Like a lack of global experience, you may have more leadership experience than you think. Consider times you led without a formal title. Do you take the reins when it comes to projects with your colleagues? Was there a committee or sub-committee that you steered in undergrad or for a non-profit or athletic endeavor? Likewise, it could be a great time to volunteer for leadership roles in the workplace, or perhaps volunteer for this responsibility in a community activity you’re involved in.   

I had a couple of jobs in a short period of time – or something else that might look bad.

This definitely happens and for a variety of different reasons.  The most important thing here is to explain the situation.  The less information you give us, the more we have to guess and though we’d love to give everyone the benefit of the doubt, this method may not be to our advantage, or yours.  The optional essay is a great place to address job switching and employment gaps.

I’m concerned about my letters of recommendation.

The most common concern here comes from not having been able to ask a current supervisor. While it’s certainly helpful to have the insight of a direct supervisor, not having one isn’t a deal breaker. Other good options could be the person you reported to prior to your current boss, current clients, a colleague who led a team for a project you worked on or the director of your department or team. The key thing to remember is when selecting recommenders, focus on people who can really speak to your strengths (and weaknesses) in key areas such as leadership, teamwork, and aptitude. Former professors, family members or your little league coach won’t help you.

Here’s the key: rather than resolve yourself to months of worry and regret over things you can’t change, there are many ways to actively turn a less than ideal situation into a more positive one. Also, you probably noticed a theme: the application process really is holistic. Really! We know that you’re way more than just one particular data point. Good luck!
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$10M Gift Honors Tuck School Dean Paul Danos  [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2015, 10:16
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When Paul Danos announced in March 2014 that he would step down from his position as dean at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business after 19 years, the news was met with considerable emotion. After all, his deanship has been the longest in the school’s history, and is one of the longest in management education. By the end of his fifth term, nearly half of Tuck’s 10,000-plus living alumni will have graduated under his deanship.

This week, the school announced it has received a $10 million endowment from more than 50 alumni and friends of Tuck to name the business school’s deanship in honor of Paul Danos. The endowment, announced May 8th at an event in Danos’ honor, will support future deans in perpetuity, thereby freeing up funds for other priorities at the school, a news release confirms.

In addition to the endowment gifts, another 100 alumni and faculty have recognized Danos by establishing a fund to provide Tuck with resources for curricular innovation and faculty excellence. This innovation fund will support the type of leading-edge initiatives that have been a hallmark of Danos’ tenure.

“Paul has really transformed Tuck,” says David Southwell, Tuck ’88, a member of the Tuck Board of Overseers. “He’s changed the curriculum, built new buildings, and raised a huge amount of money. What’s unique is that he’s been able to expand the school while keeping the culture the way it is. One of the things that we Tuckies love about the school is its intimate feel. Paul has kept that while offering a world-class set of programs.”

Danos will step down at the end of June, but the school says he won’t be leaving Tuck or Dartmouth. The retired dean will advise President Phil Hanlon on several projects and teach a course at the business school.
You may also be interested in:
Dartmouth Tuck School Names New Dean

Tuck School Creates New Global Insight Requirement

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If you are looking for guidance on your Tuck MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.
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$10M Gift Honors Tuck School Dean Paul Danos   [#permalink] 26 May 2015, 10:16

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