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Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!

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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2015, 00:48
I hope to hear from Tuck in the beginning of May or on decision date for April round candidates the latest. Deposit deadline for both November and January round applicants is April 30. So in May adcom should have clear picture how many applicants they could admit from the waitlist and April round.
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Part II: Recruiting Advice for the Investment Banking Industry from CD  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2015, 06:00
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FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Part II: Recruiting Advice for the Investment Banking Industry from CDO Expert Deirdre O’Donnell
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Deirdre O’Donnell is an associate director of the Career Development Office (CDO).

Click here for Part I of this series.

For the investment banking industry, how important is prior experience vs. performance in interview vs. networking?

The job is going to go to the person who’s competent, can do the work, and wants it the most. How do they measure how badly you want it? Part of it is networking; part of it is having really meaningful conversations with multiple people at each institution. They definitely track which events you’ve been to so you want to be at all events. It’s a huge commitment of time. Most students will go down to New York to visit banks at least once so if you’re interviewing with eight banks, that’s a lot of trips to New York. (However, it is always important to remember that the quality of your interactions outweigh the quantity.)

There are a lot of people interviewing for a very small number of jobs so your initiative and passion really play a role. The ones who want it the most are the ones who are going to get it. If a particular bank is your number-one choice, tell them that in an interview because making that commitment in the interview may make the difference between you and somebody else getting the offer. (Obviously, integrity is everything and you can only tell one bank they are your top choice.)

For bulge bracket banks, prior experience is not critical. If you can get through the Tuck curriculum and perform well, they will be confident that you can do the job. The big investment banks have very robust training where they will teach you everything you need to know based upon your level of understanding once you get in there. Middle market investment banks also have training but their associate classes are smaller. It is different when you go to the boutique investment banks. Some have training programs which are usually small, and ideally they’re looking for somebody who already has a grasp of finance, preferably with previous investment banking experience. Boutique banks will often look at somebody who’s been at a bulge bracket bank for two years and hire them laterally.

Any other advice on how best to prepare for interviews in the investment banking industry?

There are a finite number of requirements to do well in an interview and we’ve recorded most of them. Trust what the previous Tuck students have put together in terms of questions asked and practice! Practice your technical questions—you have to do well on them to get to the final round—and practice doing fit interviews so you’re thoughtful around your core competencies. Show your commitment and passion for the business, network, and reach out to second-years and young Tuck alumni.

Finally, have a clear understanding of who the Tuck recruiting team is at each bank. You only have so much time at each bank, so you need to target the right people to spend time with.
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Using Social Media as a Communications Tool  [#permalink]

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FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Using Social Media as a Communications Tool
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By Isabella Liu T'15


In Entrepreneurship in the Social Sector this past term, students paired up with nonprofits to work on a problem the nonprofits were facing and hoping to solve. Three classmates (one Tuckie, one computer science master’s, and one TDI student) and I worked with Identifor and presented our recommendation on their social media strategy this past Wednesday. Identifor is a nonprofit that provides online games geared towards autistic children and, using data from the games, helps parents identify their children’s strengths and the careers they may be well suited for. Currently in beta, Identifor is formally launching to the public in March and wanted our group to recommend a social media strategy that would help them succeed in the short term as well as the long term.

In October of 2014, with Executive Director, Prof. Hans Brechbühl, and Faculty Director, Prof. Alva Taylor, I attended the Center for Digital Strategies’ Roundtable on ‘The Business of Social’ in Zurich, Switzerland. The participating companies ranged from consumer-facing (e.g. Swarovski, Coca-Cola Enterprises) to B2B (e.g. ABB, Holcim) and topics included ‘Enterprise Social’ (using social media within a company) and ‘Engaging the Customer’ (using social media to understand market trends, customer needs, and customer perception).

Though very interested in and active on social media, I had never used social media as a communications tool for an organization. What I learned from the roundtable participants resonated with the research and work we did for Identifor. The reason many companies and nonprofits join social media is because they hear about others using social media and don’t want to fall behind. Ironically, social media is not a one-size-fits-all solution and a successful social media strategy can look very different for different organizations.

Some takeaways from the Roundtable and Identifor project:

  • ‘Me too’ mentally gets companies and nonprofits to get on social media
  • A successful social media strategy should be unique to each organization. Organizations should test out what works best for their audience—what time of day and time of week to post to get the most engagement; what networks work best; what partnerships make sense; and how to use social media with other communications tools such as the website, emails, and blogs
  • Social media should be part of a company or organization’s larger communications strategy. While social media is not going to replace other forms of traditional communication, it is a critical tool to employ going forward

Explore the complete Roundtable overviewhere.

This post originally appeared on the Center for Digital Strategies blog

The Center for Digital Strategies at Tuck focuses on enabling business strategy. Digital strategies and information technology that harness a company's unique competencies can push business strategy to a new level. At the center, we foster intellectual leadership by forging a learning community of scholars, executives, and students focused on the role of digital strategies in creating competitive advantage in corporations and value chains. We accomplish this mission by conducting high-impact research; creating a dialog between CIOs and their functional executive colleagues; and driving an understanding of digital strategies into the MBA curriculum.
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2015, 02:42
Hi,

Anyone here applying in the April Round?
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2015, 21:51
Yep, I do.
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My recruiting experience  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2015, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: My recruiting experience
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By Eliana Gomez Aristizabal T'16


Eliana is an industrial engineer from Cali, Colombia. Before coming to Tuck, she worked in marketing with consumer products and pharmaceuticals. She loves books, movies, traveling, and soccer. In Hanover, she has fallen in love with the Upper Valley. She enjoys the farmers’ markets and beautiful trails and hikes during fall, and in the winter she is learning to ski and play ice hockey.

My whole life I have always found new experiences and learning new things fascinating. I had difficulty choosing an undergraduate major because I liked so many different things. I finally decided on industrial engineering because I felt that it covered a good range of areas within businesses. Then, after working in marketing for a couple of years, I came to Tuck looking for new career opportunities.

When I was accepted to Tuck, I applied to some pre-MBA programs with consulting companies, and I was very lucky to be invited to Bain’s Diversity Pre-MBA program last summer. It was my first look into consulting and it offered exposure to different businesses and industries that had always interested me. Now, seven months later, I am happy to say that I will be joining Bain’s New York office over the summer.

When recruiting started, and Tuck’s Career Development Office (CDO) presented us with different possibilities, I decided to focus on consulting, as well as some specific general management programs that I found very interesting. Soon I realized that the opportunities I was pursuing were very competitive. As an international, and with English being a second language, I was aware that I needed a lot of preparation to get an internship in the U.S. Fortunately, Tuck offered many resources to help me prepare, and that made all the difference.

The CDO was very helpful in organizing workshops to guide us through the networking and application processes. Because I lack previous experience in the U.S. job market, I appreciated having specific workshops for every step of the process. From networking, to resumes and cover letters, and—when the time came—one on one mock interviews. I think I really needed the guidance, and it was great having it available. It was wonderful knowing that if I had any doubts, I could just drop by the office of anyone from the CDO, and they knew me and my case and could easily coach me through it.

Another unexpected resource that I found extremely helpful were other Tuckies. From my first year classmates, to second years and alumni, the way that everyone is willing to help each other is amazing. I will never forget when we were going through the resume and cover letter drops, and many first years, who were working on their own applications as well, offered to proofread others’ resumes and cover letters. Personally, I received great advice and feedback during this process.

The second years have been great. They made themselves available to help us practice for our interviews and gave us very good advice. In the case of consulting, where we had to prepare for case interviews, the possibility of having someone who has been through the process guide you gives you an edge. Then when you case with other first years you can work on the feedback from second years, enhancing your learning experience. Moreover, alumni are very approachable. Being able to reach out to a Tuckie, regardless of his/her position, and always getting an answer is invaluable.

When the decisive moment of interviews actually came, all the help I received helped me walk into my interviews with the tools and confidence to get through them. Something that I learned from the process that I think applies to Tuck in general is how many resources we have at our disposal. It is up to us to proactively reach out and take advantage of them in order to make the most out of this experience.

(Top photo by Laura DeCapua)
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From Marine to Tuckie: A Life Changing Opportunity  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2015, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: From Marine to Tuckie: A Life Changing Opportunity
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Kevin Moyer grew up in Massachusetts and received his bachelors in Political Science from the University of Maryland. He spent six years in the United States Marine Corps and is now an MBA Candidate at the Tuck School of Business.

 

Getting out of the Marines was one of the hardest decisions I’ve ever made. Leaving a stable paycheck, a great network of friends, and an organization I’d grown used to was not easy. Eight months later I can tell you with the clarity of hindsight that it was the single best decision I’ve made in my professional career. Attending a top tier business school grants you access to the best firms in the world. Places you would otherwise never get a call back from or an interview with. The value of that access cannot be overstated.

On the intellectual enrichment side, I’ve had lunch with the Chair of the National Health Service of the United Kingdom, the Bureau Chief for the Financial Times, Washington DC office and an entrepreneur who has started and sold multiple businesses for eight figures. The conversations I’ve had with these people are truly inspiring. Again, these are people I never would have been able to talk to had I not attended business school.

The idea of going two years without pay is daunting. I know. I was in your shoes very recently. But when you look at the salary and career opportunities that are available coming out of an MBA, the decision becomes pretty clear.

I’ve spent the past eight months learning a host of subjects I find intellectually challenging and extremely interesting. The people at Tuck have been incredibly supportive and helpful. Just yesterday, a friend who comes from a finance background spent two hours helping me prepare for my Corporate Finance final exam, just because he wanted to help. Those are the kind of people you find at Tuck. More than that, my classmates are genuinely interested in my background in the military and extremely appreciative of what veterans have done.

From the people, to the education, to the access to the top firms in the world, getting an MBA is an incredible life changing opportunity. Reach out to the vets clubs at the schools you’re looking at. You’ll be amazed at the support and advice you’ll get. It’s not an easy process but the rewards can be pretty amazing.

Semper Fidelis,

Kevin

Join us for Tuck's annual Military Visit Day on Monday, May 4, 2015 in Hanover, NH. The day will include a class visit and panels hosted by members of the Admissions Committee, current military students, the Career Development Office, and the Financial Aid Office.

Register today and we'll look forward to seeing you soon!
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Tuck Partner Lands a Job at the Center for Business & Society  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2015, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Partner Lands a Job at the Center for Business & Society
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By Carole Gaudet


Carole Gaudet handles marketing and communications for the Center for Business & Society, and is a little surprised to realize that she has lived in the Upper Valley for 22 years. Lauren Clark TP’16 is program manager for the Center for Business & Society. Prior to Tuck, she worked at lifeIMAGE, an IT Startup in Boston, and Benchmark Senior Living, headquartered in Wellesley, MA. She is pictured with her fiancé, Kevin Friedenberg T’16, in full regalia for the Tuck Winter Carnival. 

One of my favorite aspects of working here at the Tuck Center for Business & Society is our team. For the second time, I’m working with a program manager who also happens to be a Tuck partner—Lauren Clark TP’16. I sat down recently with Lauren to ask her about the process of looking for, and landing, a job that would be professionally and personally satisfying to her, for her two years in Hanover.

When her partner Kevin decided on Tuck, Lauren’s first thought was that she didn’t want to slow down her career. She’d been in HR prior to Tuck, and she wanted to use the two-year stint as an opportunity to try something new, gain skills in a new area, or test her old skills in a different setting.

During the admissions process, Kevin paid attention to the culture at Tuck, not just among the students, but the employees as well. He asked a lot about partner opportunities and inclusiveness, so Lauren gained a good understanding of Tuck’s culture, and wanted to be a part of it.

“In my experience,” she says, “Tuck understands the partner situation. Other employers fail to realize that our generation typically only stays in a job for two years. You aren’t really taking a risk hiring us for that time, because in all reality that would be the situation anyway. Other partners have had a harder time finding something outside of Tuck because those employers don’t understand that dynamic as well.”

Lauren’s first step was to reach out to current Tuck partners. She found their names in the online Tuck Partner Manual. “They give them out at Admitted Students Weekend (ASW), but I’m a little bit of a computer nerd, and I was able to find the one from the previous year and make use of the information sooner,” she says. She started cold calling partners to ask if they knew anyone who worked at Tuck, how they liked it, and whether they had any suggestions.

“Every single one was super helpful, got back to me, and gave me another person to contact,” Lauren says.

That led her to a phone conversation and then an in-person meeting with Beau Benson, Dartmouth College’s recruitment consultant. Lauren sent in her resume, explained her situation, and talked through her skills. Beau invited her to come up to Hanover and meet her before ASW.

“That way, she had my resume, knew my skills, and had an idea of what my personality was. When jobs came across her radar, she would send them to me when she thought they might be a good fit. That was really helpful.”

Because Lauren started the process early, she was able to get a head start by applying for a few jobs before ASW. “I spent Friday of ASW interviewing. That was valuable because I didn’t have to take another day off of work, in addition to ASW, to travel here.”

Lauren skyped with some potential employers who weren’t at Tuck that day. “They’re flexible about how they interview partners. They understand that you can’t take all this time off from work. Not everyone lives in Boston, a short drive away.”

Lauren was happy with the range of positions and opportunities that were available. “I applied for several jobs, some at Dartmouth, some at Tuck. Then Beau reached out to me directly regarding the Center for Business & Society role, and said she thought it would be a good fit for me, based on my personal interests. When I read about the position, it became my top choice. And having the opportunity to interview so early on in the process was really nice.”

Lauren started with the Center for Business & Society on June 2, 2014. Her flexibility in being able to start before Kevin joined her was a key benefit to the Center.

I asked Lauren what it meant to her to work at the place where her partner was attending school.

“At first, I wondered if we’d see each other too much. But the students truly are so busy the first couple of months, I didn’t see him as often as I thought I would. Now that things have slowed down a bit, it’s nice to have lunch together every once in a while.”

As Lauren’s office mate, I was delighted one Monday when I came to work to learn that she and Kevin had gotten engaged over the weekend.

“We didn’t come engaged, which made me a little bit nervous. I didn’t know if I would still be accepted, as a partner who wasn’t fully fledged. But you’re treated the same at Tuck, regardless. The word 'partner' is used for every significant other, not just the married or engaged. That levels the playing field, and no one really notices except for you.”

For myself, I have to say that working with Lauren and her predecessor has been a great source of professional and personal satisfaction during my own time here at Tuck. I’ve learned so much from these two women, a couple of decades my junior, from technical skills to social media tricks to a glimpse into how millennials approach life. I hope, in return, I’ve been able to introduce them to life at Tuck and in the Upper Valley in a way that enriches their time as well. Tuck partners, we love you! We’re always delighted to have you join the Tuck team.

The Center for Business & Society at Tuck aims to prepare Tuck students for leadership in this increasingly complex, interconnected world. A connected world, shifting ideologies, and the changing role of governments have made business a significant agent of transformation. Business knowledge can be applied to community needs and world issues. It can work across sectors to develop solutions. The opportunities are endless. We work to ensure that the changing issues at the intersection of business interests and society’s needs are a key component of our MBA education and a part of Tuck's broader scholarly activities.
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2015, 00:57
Rizz wrote:
Hi,

Anyone here applying in the April Round?



I am thinking about it. Is it practical for an International student to apply in the April round? :|
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BSC: Dramatic Changes in the Education Landscape  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Mar 2015, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: BSC: Dramatic Changes in the Education Landscape
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By Avi Sethi T'16


Avi is a first-year student at Tuck who previously worked for the NewSchools Venture Fund, a Palo Alto based ed-tech seed investor. Previous to NewSchools, he worked in strategy consulting at Accenture based out of New York City. He started his career as a high school math teacher in Charlotte, NC through the Teach for America program. Avi is a proud Minnesota Golden Gopher alum.

*This post originally appeared on the Tuck Center for Business & Society blog

Education is a topic important to all of us, whether personally or professionally. Scores from the 2013 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), better known as the Nation’s Report Card, showed that in math and reading, only ~35 percent of 8th graders in the US rank as proficient. The data gets worse for minorities when you break it out by race.

On the flip side, it is clear that investments in education have the power to change outcomes dramatically. When someone growing up in poverty graduates a four-year college, they end the cycle of poverty in their family forever.

As a whole, the United States is ranked outside the top 20 of developed countries in math and reading outcomes, despite spending near the most per child—total expenditures for public elementary and secondary schools in the United States amounted to $632 billion in 2010–11, or $12,608 per public school student.

At Tuck’s Business & Society Conference, we brought together three leaders in their fields to talk about these issues and how we can use better measurements to radically change the education system in America. Speaking to an audience of nearly 100 were: Graham VanderZanden, an associate partner at the NewSchools Venture Fund, Tammy Battaglino, co-head of The Parthenon Group’s Education practice, and Emary Aronson, head of education investing at The Robin Hood Foundation. These panelists were joined by one of Tuck’s leading strategy professors, Syd Finkelstein.

Takeaways from the panel:

  • Just like a shift in health care over the past decade from simply measuring inputs to focusing on outcomes, the K-12 education landscape is changing dramatically.
  • The innovation we are seeing in education today is happening at a breakneck pace—with an increased focus on standardized testing, charter schools, no child left behind, common core, flipped classrooms, blended learning, and education technology.
  • The conversation in classrooms across the country has shifted from a focus on metrics, to a focus on identifying the right metrics. How do we truly measure success?
  • There is absolutely room for people with a business skillset to make a difference. Principals are being asked to do too much—they are harder to get in touch with these days than Fortune 500 CEOs! If we are going to discover, invest in, and scale solutions to the issues in education, we will need talented and passionate MBAs to help make it happen.

I’ve been trying to figure out what role I can play in the education space, having been a former teacher, but wanted to balance that with my business skillset as a former management consultant. I found the panel especially helpful. As Graham, the education venture capitalist, mentioned, there were over $2 billion dollars invested in early stage ed-tech companies in 2014 by venture capital firms. The landscape is changing. We are on the precipice of something big. There is no time like the present to use the skills my Tuck MBA provides, to be an effective player in this change.

(Photo by David Rowe. From left: Graham VanderZanden of NewSchools Venture Fund; Tamara Butler Battaglino of The Parthenon Group; Emary Aronson of Robin Hood; and Tuck professor Sydney Finkelstein, Moderator)
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Teamwork, leadership were the difference for Tuck’s 2014 GE case compe  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Mar 2015, 09:00
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FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Teamwork, leadership were the difference for Tuck’s 2014 GE case competition championship
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By Eric Giles T'16


Eric is a career switcher who transitioned from an education nonprofit—Teach For America—to the health care sector. He hopes to expand health access to all populations.

Earlier this year, three classmates and I beat top business schools from across the Northeast to win General Electric’s 2014 Regional Case Competition. While our victory was a very proud moment, what stood out the most during the experience was how our leadership and interpersonal skills were key to our victory. We learn so many important business concepts in our curriculum—corporate finance, decision science, macroeconomics, etc.—but this experienced proved to me that Tuck’s cultivation of leadership is what gives Tuckies the competitive edge.

Our case team had two weeks to create two “industrial internet” products and develop a business model around those concepts. If you are reading this and are not familiar with the term “industrial internet,” don’t worry, we didn’t know what it meant either. Our team had worked previously in schools, the Navy, Barclays, and a customizable ping pong paddle startup, and none of us had any idea of where to even start designing an industrial product. Rather than view our lack of experience as a weakness, we relished and leveraged our unique backgrounds to develop two highly innovative and impactful products. At Tuck, we learn to understand the strengths others bring and use those to create value. Using that skill propelled our products to be the most innovative at the competition.

Leadership extends beyond good teamwork. We were also tremendous listeners (the most underrated leadership skill, in my opinion). While we certainly listened to each other internally to understand our perspectives, we listened to GE closely. We spent more time than our competition working to understand how GE evaluates their projects and we consciously molded every element of our presentation around GE’s ideal. As one judge put it, our team “checked every box” in our product and business design, elevating our presentation above the competition. Tuck is a close knit community and we have to develop skills in listening and empathy to thrive. This competition was a prime example of how those skills translate to success in the business arena.

Understanding how to calculate the weighted average cost of capital and the forces that move exchange rates are critical to our success as business leaders. However, the “soft skills” ultimately determine our ability to use the "hard skills" to create value. It takes years to develop the ability to deeply understand others' perspectives, invest people around an idea, and manage a group of diverse individuals to execute in unison. I feel lucky to be at Tuck where I will intensely cultivate and practice these skills for two years. Like no other school, Tuck’s students, faculty, and staff challenge me each and every day to grow as a leader, and that is what will ultimately make all the difference.

(Photo above of Tuck GE team: From left, Cooper Fallek T'16, Eric Giles T'16, Chris Hogan T'16, and Bradley Webb T'16.)
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Your MBA Application: Areas for Improvement  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2015, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Your MBA Application: Areas for Improvement
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Sometimes we just don’t have all of the credentials, the experience, or the skills we need to ensure we will get to where we want to be. There are times when these challenges can be overcome with hard work, dedicated focus on improving our prospects, and just a little creative thinking. The MBA application is no different. There are several situations that can leave a candidate feeling less than confidant about gaining admission to their dream school.  First, to ease your fears: there are some fairly common stumbling blocks on the road to an MBA--and they can often be overcome, or at least minimized.

Here’s the key: rather than resolve yourself to months of worry and regret over things you can’t change, there are many ways to actively turn a less than ideal situation into a more positive one.  It’s also important to keep in mind that the application process really is holistic. We know that you’re way more than just one particular data point.

 

My undergraduate GPA is low.

First, keep in mind that the Admissions Committee reviews applicants with a very holistic approach.  While important, a low undergraduate GPA in itself won’t prevent admission.  Also note that while your GPA may be below a school’s average, it may be within its range. 

That being said, a low GPA is still a weakness in your application that should be addressed.  If possible, start by acknowledging this in the optional essay and providing an explanation (not an excuse!).  Finally, prove to us that you’re capable of handling an extremely rigorous, and quant heavy, curriculum.  You can do this by scoring well on the GMAT (or GRE), taking additional, supplemental classes beyond your undergraduate degree and submitting well-written essays.  It’s also important to clearly show us areas you do excel in; leadership, global experiences, community involvement, etc.

My GMAT score isn’t where I want it to be.

Very similar to having a low undergraduate GPA.  To reiterate, the admissions process is holistic and a school’s average GMAT is just that, an average.  One big difference here actually works in your favor; if you’re unhappy with your GMAT score, you can always study harder and retake it, without consequence.  After giving it your best effort, if you feel like there’s no amount of additional preparation that will improve your score, you’re still not out of the game.  Again, you’ll need to prove you can handle a rigorous quantitative curriculum; high undergraduate GPA, supplemental courses with good scores (we often suggest financial accounting, statistics and microeconomics), etc.  Finally, highlight areas of your background that shine.

I come from an unconventional professional background.

Great!  Tuck values unique experiences and individuals – many students decide to go to business school with the intention of switching careers, so you won’t be alone.  Show us through things like your essays and interview how that unconventional experience will actually bring a different and positive perspective to your classmates.  Also, while you may not have been crunching numbers, there’s a good chance you’ve been honing skills that will help you succeed in business; leadership traits, interpersonal skills, communication expertise, etc.  Be sure to tell us the reality of the situation, not just what you think we want to hear.  Is your previous work experience based on a passion of yours?  Wonderful!  Let us know.  Additionally, take some time to reflect on some important questions – for you and for us.  What are your long-term goals?  How will an MBA help you achieve them?  Why now?  Why Tuck?  Once you answered these, if your path still leads you to Tuck, your sincerity and passion will be evident.

I have very little global experience.

Like everything else, global experience is an important factor in your application, but certainly not the only one.  You may have more global experience than you think.  Have you worked or lived outside your home country?  Have you visited for an extended period of time?  Have you worked with global clients within your home country?  Do you know a second language?  Or, maybe this is the perfect time to jump on that international opportunity you’ve been postponing.

I’m not sure my current supervisor will be supportive of my decision to apply to b-school, so don’t think it will be a good idea to ask for a recommendation.

This is a fairly common dilemma for many applicants. While it’s certainly helpful to have the insight of a direct supervisor, not having one is not a deal breaker. Consider reaching out to the person you reported to prior to your current boss. Other options may be current clients, a colleague who led a team for a project you worked on or the director of your department or team. The key thing to remember is when selecting recommenders, focus on people who can really speak to your strengths (and weaknesses) in key areas such as leadership, teamwork, and aptitude. Steer clear of asking former professors, family members or your little league coach.

 

Other concerns? Follow-up questions? Join Senior Associate Director of Admissions, Amy Mitson, for a Q&A on Beat the GMAT, Wednesday, April 1 from 12-1pm ET. 
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Apr 2015, 06:55
Hello,

I am planning to apply EA/R1 next fall, and I'd love to visit the campus, attend a class and have the applicant initiated interview. However, I have been told that the times to reserve your spot for an interview are posted around August and they fly by... By that time, it might even be too late to book a flight at a decent price (flying from Spain) and, ideally, I'd like to visit before the deadline. Assuming the deadlines for each round are similar and that class visits/applicant initiated interviews start on early/mid September, would it be safe to book a flight for the second fortnight of September and then arrange the visit as soon as the dates are released?

Any thoughts on this, or did you just wait until the last minute to book your flight?

Thank you!

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Five Reasons to Attend ASW 2015  [#permalink]

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FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Five Reasons to Attend ASW 2015
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By Kiley Winsnes T'16


Kiley is a first-year student at Tuck. Before arriving in Hanover, she was living in stunning San Francisco and working for an integration software company. Originally from Chicago, Kiley spent her formative years in Seattle before chasing the California sunshine for her undergraduate degree in economics and religious studies. After Tuck, she hopes to get a job that combines two of her passions: fitness and technology. Outside of the classroom, Kiley enjoys running, road biking, writing, and the beverages of her two home cities: coffee and wine. Kiley can be contacted at kiley.j.winsnes.tu16@tuck.dartmouth.edu. Follow her on Twitter at @kileywins.

Why should you attend Admitted Students Weekend (ASW)?

1.) You’re not sure if Tuck is the right school for you.

I know—really starting off on a creative foot here. But seriously, let’s not ignore the obvious reason for attending any admitted student event: to decide if the school is the right place for you. Whether you’re leaning toward Tuck or (sadly, for me) away from it, ASW is worth the trip and the time. An MBA is not a small investment, so why not do your due diligence? Even if you think you’re set on another school, visiting all of your options is still a good idea. If it changes your mind, fantastic. If not, you can make your decision with confidence. That’s what we call a win-win. You wouldn’t buy a Lamborghini (I like to be aspirational in my metaphors) without a test drive, would you? So why not invest a weekend to come and kick the tires on Tuck (see what I did there)?

2.) You’re not sure if Hanover is the right place for you.

If I wasn’t able to convince you with my blog post last fall, you need to come see this place for yourself. I understand the concern: Hanover is a small town. No one is denying that, but I can say it’s pretty unique as far as small towns go. (Trust me, people, my mom is from Wisconsin. I know small towns.).

If your concern is about recruiting in a place far from a city, our Career Development Office will prove to you it’s not an issue. We bring so many companies and executives on campus that the only thoughts you’ll have about location is gratitude that you don’t have to deal with NYC or Boston traffic on your way to an interview.

If your concern is about small-town life, a weekend in Hanover will prove to you that this is an adorable, vibrant place, with great dining options, breathtaking (no, literally, I gasp sometimes) natural beauty, and access to more outdoor activities than any human could possibly take advantage of.

In case I’m coming off too biased, I will temper my enthusiasm with one comment about what you may miss in Hanover: shopping. I know, how *ever* will you survive for nine months without access to a mall? (Hint: it starts with an “A” and ends with “mazon.com”)

3.) You’re not sure if an MBA is right for you.

Maybe you’re one of those folks who applied to schools not 100 percent sure you even wanted to go. Maybe your company has offered you a pretty sweet promotion/raise/new office if you stay. Maybe you recently visited the website that outlines tuition costs and laughed, out loud, at your previous self’s decision to spend that much money. All completely fair possibilities.

The great thing about ASW is that it’s non-binding. If you’re having doubts, come anyway. What better chance is there to spend a weekend surrounded by people who have been exactly where you are now? We’ll have plenty of Tuck alums who can help answer the classic “So, was it worth it?” question so many admitted students have. I’m not one of those people who thinks an MBA is right for everyone, but I do think if you’ve gotten this far in the process, you owe it to yourself to investigate the option as much as possible and make an informed decision. And that's exactly what ASW is here to help you do.

4.) Your partner’s not sure if Tuck/Hanover/an MBA is right for the two of you.

Maybe you’re not the only one who will be affected by your decision to come to Tuck. Maybe your husband/wife/partner/children/sibling/aunt/best friend/dog will also be coming along with you. Awesome! But, of course, that means convincing that person/those people/that four-legged friend that Tuck and Hanover are the right place for them for two years, too. There are a ton of factors that go into that decision, but I think your TP (“Tuck Partner.” See? They even get an awesome acronym!) will be pleasantly surprised by the community they’ll be joining. ASW will offer great chances for potential TPs to meet with current TPs, attend panels about finding employment, life at Tuck, life with kids at Tuck (Tiny Tuckies! They have a name, too!), housing in the Upper Valley, and more.

5.) You want to have an amazing weekend.

Free April 17th and 18th? Want to get out of the city? Meet some cool new people? Eat delicious food and have fantastic conversations? Perfect. We want that for you, too. Come join us at ASW. It’s going to be an incredible weekend: the first taste of your two incredible years here at Tuck. (Slightly presumptuous of me? Don’t care. After ASW, you’ll see that I’m right.)

*Note from Admissions: Regardless of where you are in the application process, we encourage everyone to experience the Tuck community in person. As a prospective student, you can interview, tour the campus, attend classes, have lunch with students, and talk to an admissions officer. Even if you aren't sure about applying to Tuck, visit us anyway! In the spring, we encourage you to come and get a feel for life at Tuck without participating in an evaluative interview.

That said, we believe that strong interpersonal skills are essential for success as a leader and a team member. Accordingly, admissions interviews play a critical role in the evaluation process and give us a more complete understanding of you as a candidate. Although visits are not a required component of the application, we strongly recommend that all applicants (including reapplicants and international applicants) schedule an interview on campus during the admissions cycle in which they are applying.

(Photo above of the ASW  co-chairs, from left: Kiley Winsnes T'16, Kate Landry T'16, Sebastian Restrepo T'16, and Kat Carmody T'16.)
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An Introduction to the Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship,  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Apr 2015, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: An Introduction to the Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship, Part 1
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By Thomas Naughton D’89, T’96

Tom Naughton is the executive director of Tuck's Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship and an adjunct professor of business administration. 

The Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship (CPE/E) is one of several academic centers here at Tuck. Our academic director is Colin Blaydon, who is also the William and Josephine Buchanan Professor of Management as well as Tuck Dean Emeritus. I am the CPE/E executive director and was in venture capital for many years before returning to Tuck.

Private equity is a fascinating field that allows you to not only work with the smartest people on the planet, but also to finance their dreams. It uses your full business school skill-set, both qualitatively and quantitatively, everything from finance to people skills to industry and trend analysis. Private equity means using your full complement of skills at the cutting edge, which I love.

Here’s an important note: when we say “private equity,” we mean the entire ecosystem: private equity, growth equity, venture capital, limited partners. That’s a good thing because one of the key components of the Tuck network, which is especially true for private equity, is that we have a very tight network that can work on your behalf.

As with all of Tuck’s Centers, there are three goals of the CPE/E: academic, industry and alumni outreach, and students. We like to call them the three legs of the stool since each is crucial.

1. Academic: We help professors do research in the fields of private equity and entrepreneurship. In addition, Colin Blaydon and I co-teach the Private Equity Finance course, and Trip Davis (of Dartmouth’s Office of Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer (OETT) and I co-teach the Entrepreneurial Thinking course, which is the first-year entrepreneurship class.

2. Industry and alumni outreach: We’re fortunate here at Tuck and Dartmouth—and the CPE/E is very much about Tuck and Dartmouth—that our alumni network is pervasive throughout the industry in private equity, venture capital, and entrepreneurship. We have an advisory board of practitioners in the field from across the private equity landscape and sponsor board meetings and board dinners throughout the year. We also put on a private equity conference in the winter and help sponsor the Dartmouth Ventures conference in the spring.

3. Students: This is the most important of the three legs—really, our role is to augment the student experience and serve as a resource for students who want to go deep in private equity or entrepreneurship. We work closely with the Private Equity Club and the Entrepreneurship Club to program events. We have Ayres MBA Fellows as well as Fellows of the Center that help with classes and serve as resources. We also sponsor independent studies and projects for students to work with private equity firms while they’re at Tuck.

Experiential learning—especially learning how to manage capital—is crucial to our mission. The most exciting development is that we are close to launching a family of student-run investment funds so that our students can invest in a buyout fund, venture fund, long fund, long/short equity fund, and a soon-to-be-developed social impact fund.

Because I was in industry as a venture capitalist, I can be a resource for students as they start their own companies and work closely with the Entrepreneurship Initiative, too.

The best place to start learning about us is to go to our website. We invite you to check it out!

(Photo by Mark Washburn)
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What We Learned: Tuckies Reflect on Israel Global Insight Expedition (  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2015, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: What We Learned: Tuckies Reflect on Israel Global Insight Expedition (GIX)
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By Nathan Isaacson T'15, Yishen Xu T'15, Adam Klene T'16, and Kiley Winsnes T'16

Seventeen students traveled to Israel over spring break to attend a Global Insight Expedition (GIX) led by Adam Kleinbaum, associate professor of business administration. Global Insight Expeditions offer students opportunities to travel to a variety of countries to learn how business is done around the world. They learn about each country's unique business environment, opportunities for social entrepreneurship, and the role of business people in addressing social challenges.

These four students offer their biggest takeaways from their time in Israel.

Nathan T’15

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Nathan is a second year student at Tuck, originally hailing from Maine. Nathan studied history and political theory at Bowdoin College. Prior to Tuck, he worked in Boston at Deloitte Consulting and New Balance. This past summer, Nathan interned with New Balance in Europe. At Tuck, Nathan is a fellow for the Center for Digital Strategies, co-chair of the Amos Trout Fly-Fishing Club, and plays tripod hockey and squash. He counts winning a tripod championship as one of his proudest moments at Tuck. After graduation, Nathan will return to New Balance in the direct-to-consumer/digital strategy group.

Even though it is not specifically business or education related, the contrast between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv has been one of the most striking experiences I had on our trip. I began my trip in Israel in Tel Aviv with five other students from Tuck. We had an unbelievable time, but for a while I thought that might have been more a product of traveling with good friends than it was due to Tel Aviv itself. Our return to Tel Aviv on the GIX has proven to me that this beautiful city on the coast deserves the credit.

Jerusalem is of immense cultural, historical, and religious importance. It is one of, if not the oldest city to which I have traveled. The significance of the structures, stories, events, and people who make up the history of the city is overwhelming.

If Jerusalem is all that is the past, Tel Aviv is the future and the present. This city has a vibrancy that rivals or exceeds that of any European or American city. To begin with, it is gorgeous, in everything from its beaches, to its streets, to its people. The young demographics of the city and the prosperous nature of the economy result in an energy that, when combined with the laid back beach culture, is simply infectious.

Before traveling to Israel I had heard that Jerusalem and Tel Aviv were very different places, but I could not fully visualize or appreciate the contrast. In my head Israel was Jerusalem; old, tradition-oriented, and dominated by conflict. Upon leaving the country, my association is now with Tel Aviv, a city full of promise and liveliness with which I have fallen in love.

Yishen T’15

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Yishen is a second-year student at Tuck. She spent three years as an auditor at PricewaterhouseCoopers before Tuck, and will transition into management consulting after graduation.

A highlight of the trip for me was the Shabbat dinner hosted by Alon, who is secular, and Chen, who is orthodox. We asked Alon if couples sharing different religious beliefs are common in Israel and how each of their family reacted to them starting a relationship. Alon admitted there was serious concern at first, but when the family met Alon and Chen in person, they accepted and welcomed them as who they.

This reinforced my belief that conflicts and misunderstandings could be better solved at the individual or civilian level. Of course, compromise is necessary as in any other relationship. For example, Alon participating in Shabbat dinner and other religious activities that Chen believes in is compromise. They’ve transferred those pure religious activities into something of their own, an opportunity of showing their affection and caring to each other.

Adam T’16

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Adam Klene is a first-year Tuck student from Quincy, IL. After graduating from the University of Notre Dame, Adam worked for Deloitte Consulting in the strategy & operations group in Chicago where he served primarily consumer products clients. At Tuck, he is involved in the golf, entertainment, sports, and media clubs and is a TuckStuff intern.

Being in Israel during one of the most internationally watched Israeli elections in years is something I will certainly remember about this trip. I will remember the campaign posters of various parties, the complete chaos that Election Day elicited on the city of Tel Aviv (the beach that afternoon was packed!), the conversations with bartenders and other Israelis in a local pub that evening, and the utter surprise of the outcome that resulted the next morning. Before this trip, I hardly knew anything about Israeli politics. Now, I feel that I have a strong understanding of the political landscape and will certainly keep a closer eye on Israeli politics going forward.

Kiley T’16

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Kiley is a first-year student at Tuck. Before arriving in Hanover, she was living in stunning San Francisco and working for an integration software company. Originally from Chicago, Kiley spent her formative years in Seattle before chasing the California sunshine for her undergraduate degree in economics and religious studies. After Tuck, she hopes to get a job that combines two of her passions: fitness and technology. Outside of the classroom, Kiley enjoys running, road biking, writing, and the beverages of her two home cities: coffee and wine. Kiley can be contacted at kiley.j.winsnes.tu16@tuck.dartmouth.edu. Follow her on Twitter at @kileywins.

On this trip, I found myself wondering how Israelis' military service—an experience we discussed in terms of its effects on Israelis as employees—also shapes the Israeli network.

While visiting Microsoft, we learned that Israel is a small community, and that it's often likely you're no more than a single degree of separation from someone you've just met. Additionally, Israelis' time in the military provides a perfect opportunity for individuals to witness their colleagues operate in high-stakes situations.

From the outset, young Israelis get to watch their fellow soldiers as they begin their careers, take on leadership roles, and generally express their working styles. This kind of insight is incredibly rare, providing not only the perfect environment for developing strong, lasting interpersonal bonds, but also the chance to see how one's colleagues operate under immense pressure. Network building under fire.

I think the effect military service has on individuals' networks, and the Israeli network as a whole, are fantastic recipes for success.

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We Are Tuck: Tuck Seder & What “Many journeys, One Tuck” Really Means  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2015, 10:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: We Are Tuck: Tuck Seder & What “Many journeys, One Tuck” Really Means
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By Ken Yoshida T’15

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Ken is a second-year student originally from Tokyo, Japan. Prior to Tuck, he worked in the energy division of a Japanese conglomerate. At Tuck, he enjoys all the moments he spends with his classmates, including visiting friends’ hometowns. Last summer he became a big fan of Seattle, and the next place he wants to visit is Alaska.

Finally, the night I was awaiting for so long arrived once more!

Last year, my Jewish classmates invited me to the Passover Seder at Tuck, which was my very first Seder experience. I learned so much about the culture and the pride of the Jewish people. I also enjoyed the tradition and the food. Our reading of the story of the liberation and our singing of songs in Hebrew allowed me to feel, once again, the closeness of the people at Tuck. There was so much love and happiness in the room. The Passover Seder was my favorite dinner at Tuck, and I truly appreciated how the Tuck Jewish Club was willing to share its culture and open its doors to everyone.

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As we came closer to this year’s Passover Seder dinner, I was quite excited. This year, we were in a larger room so that we could have more friends around us! We each read a paragraph from the book that presents the traditional story of the Hebrew’s liberation. Our Jewish friends took the lead in singing songs in Hebrew, but it did not take much time for the rest of us to become involved. We ate “matzo.” We drank the four cups of wine which symbolize freedom as we moved on with the storytelling. We had the Seder Plate and everyone asked our Jewish friends questions about what each food represented. The Passover Seder is not a loud music dance party. It is also not a dinner that is too formal or tedious. We appreciated the Jewish tradition, drank wine, sang songs, smiled often, and, most importantly, felt the love of the people around us. I had so much fun at this dinner again this year, and I continue to say that this is my favorite dinner at Tuck.

 

It is wonderful that I have learned about different cultures from friends at Tuck. I am Japanese and have never had a Jewish friend before Tuck, but now I am enthusiastically writing about the Passover Seder on this blog. It is easy to know someone from a different country, but I think I need to be very close with that person if I really wanted to understand and appreciate the culture at a deeper level. This is because if I have a close friend, I will have more personal attachment to his or her culture, and also I won’t need to hesitate when asking questions. Moreover, since everyone is intimate at Tuck, we are accustomed with people learning from others all the time. We have all lived different lives. We all know different things. Tuck is thus a beautiful crossroad. I think that this is what we mean when we say, “Many journeys. One Tuck.”

(Photo above by Nicole Daniele T'16. Photo at right by Wendy Zhao T'15. Video below by Ken Yoshida T'15.)

 
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Apr 2015, 12:48
Any April round applicant got invited to interview?
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Respect, Resilience, Harmony: What I Learned on the Japan Global Insig  [#permalink]

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FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Respect, Resilience, Harmony: What I Learned on the Japan Global Insight Expedition
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By Dmitry Kaleganov T'16

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Dmitry is a first-year student at Tuck who is originally from Moscow, Russia. Before Tuck, Dmitry worked as the head of IT Operational Excellence office for Sberbank, the largest bank in Central and Eastern Europe which employees more than 240,000 people in Russia and is represented in more than 20 countries. Previous to Sberbank, he worked for boutique project management consulting company PM Expert and large Austrian banking group Raiffeisen International. Dmitry is a proud alumnus of the second oldest university in Russia, Bauman Moscow State Technical University.

During the 2015 spring break, 15 tuckies, including me, went to Japan for the Global Insight Expedition, “Japan Today: Through the Lens of the 2011 Tohoku Triple Disaster.” The major goal for students was to learn about Japanese reconstruction efforts after the devastating earthquake. The GIX was led by former CEO of AmeriCares and Tuck professor Curtis Welling and the Japan country representative of AmeriCares Ramona Bajema. It was an extremely intense and enriching trip. We went to eight cities: Tokyo, Fukushima City, Sendai, Ishinomaki, Minami-sanriku, Rikuzentakata, Ofunato, and Ichinoseki.

Our group learned about Japan’s efforts to reform its energy sector after shutting down nuclear power plants supplying 30 percent of its energy. We interacted with local people affected by the disaster and with leaders in government, business, and NGOs who are engaged in efforts to revitalize Japan’s economy. All of these experiences were very valuable, however, the major discovery for me was learning more about the Japanese people, their mindset, and way of thinking. I want to tell you about three words that are common, but are the most important ones for Japanese society: respect, resilience, and harmony.

During our trip, I realized that Japanese people are very close in mindset and behavior to Russians. I remembered my business trips to Yekaterinburg, Russia while I was at Sberbank. The border between Europe and Asia is in the Urals regions of Russia. I remember many Europe-Asia border monuments, but I always questioned this border, because Russians are an interesting blend of European and Asian people. I realized that behavioral norms that were infused in me in the Soviet Union were similar to norms in Japan: respect (respect for the elderly, respect for the people around you, etc.) modesty, silence, being hardworking, etc.

I learned that the word Respect is the most important word in Japanese culture as well as in Russian: it penetrates every aspect of people’s lives, but in Japan it spans even further into behavior and Image
interaction.

Even though I have traveled to more than 30 countries, I have never seen a more clean country—it’s crystal clean even around gigantic construction areas in the Tohoku region. Cleanliness doesn't depend on the availability of trash bins: you may not find a trash bin within a mile of where you are. People are so respectful that they just carry their own trash with them. They are so respectful that they do not cross the road when there is a red light even there are no cars or people around. They are so respectful that they are very silent in common areas: subway, bullet train, the street, and in shopping centers. Respect was instilled in Japanese people for many centuries, so the ceremonial behavior of the Japanese, such as obeying all thr rules, may seem strange to western people.

Our senseis, Curtis Welling and Ramona Bajema, through continuous reflections and sensitive guidance, helped us to understand and internalize the importance of Respect in Japanese culture. I believe that this deep understanding impacted every student in the group.

The second important word is Resilience. Before going to Japan, I thought that Russians were the only ones so resilient that they became stronger when faced with extreme adversity, such as during World War II with the loss of over 30 million people. However, seeing the process of how Japanese people overcame the Tohoku Triple Disaster, I was happily surprised to learn that Japanese people share this same resilience and a never-give-up attitude. Meeting with displaced people who lost not only their homes in the tsunami but also their families, I have seen a strong will to fight until the end. Even though they are surrounded ugly black plastic bags with contaminated soil, they are happy to live, work hard, and contribute to the community to help others overcome the effects of disaster.

Last, but not least, there is the word Harmony. It is important for the Japanese to reach an agreement together with the local community before deciding on almost anything: building a sea wall, a kids’ playground, or a hospital for the elderly. The process of reaching an agreement in the community is important and may take several years. Even now, some communities are debating over whether a sea wall should be built. There are tradeoffs to be made: some level of protection from a tsunami versus having a visible and spiritual connection with the ocean. However, in the end, everything results in harmony and agreement, strengthening the Japanese local communities as the building block of the nation.

Respecting each other and overcoming hurdles together, the Japanese people are overcoming such a terrifying disaster and are returning an important harmony to Japan. Learning about tragedies and ways people are overcoming them, one can learn how to be a better person. Fifteen Tuck students learned about three common but very important words: Respect, Resilience, and Harmony.

Now these students are ready to enrich business society through their life changing experience.

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Dmitry with Akiko san, a local farmer in the Fukushima prefecture who is trying to rebound farming there by growing flowers where is prohibited to grow food because of nuclear contamination.
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Tuck Facts & Figures: Alumni  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2015, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck Facts & Figures: Alumni
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Tuck is renowned for our passionate and committed alumni. As you consider Tuck, we hope you'll connect with alums to experience that passion first-hand.

The graphic below is just a small snapshot highlighting Tuck's alumni loyalty and achievement. You can learn more about their accomplishments and endeavors in our online Newsroom or as features on Tuck's Facebook page.  

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As a Tuck student, you'll have access to one of the most effective alumni networks in the world; to our faculty of leading scholar-educators; to jobs at the world's top companies; and to compensation rates that are among the highest for top MBA programs.

Here are a few more facts you should know about Tuck.

Ready to take the next step? Create a profile today and receive personalized emails, participate in online chats, be invited to events in your area (which often feature Tuck alumni sharing their story), and begin your Tuck application when it goes live this summer. 
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Tuck Facts & Figures: Alumni   [#permalink] 10 Apr 2015, 06:00

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