GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 08 Apr 2020, 11:03

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!

  new topic post reply Update application status  
Author Message
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
Tuckies Head to South Africa for Global Insight Expedition  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Apr 2015, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuckies Head to South Africa for Global Insight Expedition
Image

By Jane Shiverick T’15, Tuck Bridge ’08

Image
Jane grew up in Bronxville, NY. She graduated from Trinity College in 2008 with a double major in psychology and Italian studies. Before Tuck, she worked in New York City in wine import and distribution.

I spent my spring break in South Africa, traveling with 25 Tuck students on a trip led by Tuck’s very own native South African, Phil Stocken, associate dean for the MBA program and a professor of accounting. This trip was one of the more popular Global Insight Expeditions (GIX) that students have the option of enrolling in during spring break each year. The expedition earns you course credit and counts toward the new global requirement that is now part of the Tuck curriculum.

Traveling with Dean Stocken presented a unique opportunity to see South Africa and gain a deeper understanding of the country than would likely be possible for the typical tourist on a safari. That being said, we did have the pleasure of spending a couple days at a bush lodge taking in the beautiful landscape and admiring the wild animals!

We had special access to a set of South Africa’s most prominent companies (Eskom, Sasol, Anglo American, Pick n’ Pay), exposing us to the opportunities and challenges these businesses face. The nation has undergone considerable transformation in the past two decades following the collapse of the apartheid system, thus it is an interesting time to experience first-hand the social, economic, and political climate, and to discover what it all means for businesses today in South Africa.

The country has been experiencing rolling blackouts of electricity as a result of capacity challenges at the centralized power utility, Eskom. As one can imagine, rolling blackouts present huge problems for businesses. Imagine running a national grocery chain and dealing with these outages! We learned that Pick n’ Pay, the leading grocery chain, has had to install generators in all of its stores, lest all of the ice cream melt and the milk spoil. Simultaneously, booming demand for residential power generators is causing such units to fly off the shelves in Pick n’ Pay stores, providing a slightly positive twist on the electricity challenge and its impact on business (if you are in the business of selling power generators).

One business that we also visited that is exempt from the “load shedding” (the term for the planned power outages) is Anglo Image
American, one of the world’s largest mining companies, with a substantial part of its operations based in South Africa. This mining giant is exempt due to the catastrophe that would result from an underground mine losing power. We learned about this issue first-hand as we went down in the mine.  It was clear very quickly that one would really would not want the lights or water pumps to go out down there.  Donning fashionable jumpsuits, hard hats, and miner’s lamps, we journeyed deep down into the earth at one of Anglo American’s platinum mines. The scale of the operation in a mine certainly makes you appreciate the capital intensive nature of the mining industry, and the grueling labor required to extract minerals from the earth. Crawling on your hands and knees through a platinum ore is not a job for the claustrophobic!

Another element of the current climate in South Africa is income inequality. Companies shouldn't ignore this issue, as they are responsible for the well-being of their employees and for ensuring a healthy and capable workforce. The grocery chain, Pick n’ Pay, was notably forward-thinking about investing in its employees—ensuring store workers were provided with safe transportation to and from work, and access to meals and clothing. Pick n’ Pay also invested in its suppliers—supporting small farmers and entrepreneurs and helping them to grow their own businesses, and to create wealth and income stability in their communities.  We also visited a small, for-profit company called MonkeyBiz that empowered women in impoverished townships by providing a way to earn income through craft-making. These companies exemplify the power—and responsibility—that businesses have to improve their communities, particularly in a country grappling with 25 percent unemployment and massive income inequality. 

This GIX wasn’t all business, however. Our group enjoyed game drives in Pilanesburg National Park, a rewarding hike up Cape Town’s iconic Table Mountain, scenic drives along the Cape Town peninsula, a wine tasting at the notable Klein Constantia winery, and the pleasure of each other’s company over sundowner cocktails each evening.

A home-cooked meal is arguably the best perk of traveling with a local when you are far from home. The trip concluded with a memorable dinner provided by Dean Stocken’s sister and brother-in-law, who graciously treated us to a spectacular braai (a traditional South African barbecue) at their beautiful home in Cape Town.

(Photo above: Tuck students hike to the top of Table Mountain and enjoyed a well-earned panoramic view of beautiful Cape Town. Photo at right: Tuck students prepare to head down an elevator approximately 100 stories down into the earth at the Anglo American platinum mine.)
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
My First Summer in the Tuck Family  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Apr 2015, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: My First Summer in the Tuck Family
Image

By Erica Johnston T'15

Image
Erica is a second-year student from Chicago. She studied marketing and international business at Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to Tuck, she worked in operations management in the industrial sector. A career-switcher, Erica has plans to work in brand management within the food industry.

Before arriving at Tuck, I’d heard a lot about the “devoted alumni network,” but I wondered if this was just marketing hullabaloo or if my experience would live up to the hype. Let’s just say it didn’t take long for me to realize that this was the real deal. Take last summer for example.

It all started last spring.  I had my sights set on working in brand management, in the food industry, preferably in the organic space. Using Tuck’s alumni database, I learned that Lauren Tankersley T’07 works for WhiteWave Foods, one of my target companies. I reached out to Lauren via email and in less than 24 hours from our first contact, she’d helped me secure a first round interview. Thanks in part to Lauren’s advice and feedback, I landed the internship at WhiteWave and had the privilege to work for Lauren on one of my favorite brands, Silk.

Now that the job was secured, I had to find housing and transportation for my summer in Denver, where WhiteWave is headquartered. Having never been to Denver, I turned to Lorea Barturen T’14, a former Denver resident, to help me narrow down neighborhoods. Unfortunately, I found the temporary housing market to be limited and pricey. Factor that into a student budget along with the need for a rental car and I began to worry. As I sat at my desk in my Tuck dorm room, wondering what to do, an email popped up from my fairy godmother. (Well, that’s how I think of her.) Sue Allon T’89, someone who I’d never met nor communicated with, emailed me out of the blue offering me the opportunity to live with her and her family for the summer. Not only that, but she offered me a car to borrow for the summer. To top it off, Sue and her husband Harvey refused to let me compensate them for their generosity. “Someday you’ll be in a similar position and I know you’ll open your doors to Tuckies and others,” she told me.

Sue and her family welcomed me with open arms. They invited me to join in on family dinners, events, and connected me to the Denver community. I enjoyed discussing the daily headlines with Harvey over breakfast. A fellow health-conscious foodie and adventurous eater, Harvey introduced me to many new, exciting foods. (If you haven’t tried a Chia Pod, go for it!) I had a great time going out with Sue and garnering career and life advice along the way. Our first adventure was Image
to an over 100-year-old iris farm where we dug our own irises to add to the Allon family garden. What better way to get to know someone than to dig irises together?! I also really enjoyed getting to know Sue & Harvey’s daughter, Natalie, too. I found myself feeling jealous when she told me she got to spend part of her summer in Hanover for a Dartmouth summer program. I’d also be remiss if I didn’t mention the pets that rounded out my summer family—three dogs, a cat, and three chickens kept me company and brought me many laughs.

Sue didn’t just welcome me into her family, she also helped me make the most of my summer. Before I even landed foot in Denver, she’d scheduled a lunch for me with the CEO of WhiteWave, Gregg Engles D’79, a rare opportunity. Most of my coworkers hadn’t even met Gregg, much less have lunch with him!  Sue works magic! Now you’re starting to understand the fairy godmother thing, right? 

Other Tuckies also made my Denver summer special. Newton Logan T’81 and his family invited me into their home for a lovely home-cooked meal. Michael Needel T’15 and I welcomed two T’16s, Remi Evans and Jon Elkin, into the Tuck family over drinks. I hosted the Denver Global Tuck 'Tails, which close to 20 local alumni—from T’72s to T’16s—attended and sparked the inception of a Tuck women’s monthly dinner.

I could go on and on, but you get the picture. I’ve learned that the Tuck network is more than your everyday, run-of-the-mill network. Tuckies are family.

(Photo above: Erica catches up with Sue Allon T'89 at Tuck.)

Image

Hiking with Jon Elkin T’16

Image

Global Tuck 'Tails

Image

Drinks with Jon Elkin T’16, Remi Evans T’16, and Michael Needel T’15
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 04 Jul 2014
Posts: 293
Location: India
GMAT 1: 640 Q47 V31
GMAT 2: 640 Q44 V34
GMAT 3: 710 Q49 V37
GPA: 3.58
WE: Analyst (Accounting)
Reviews Badge
Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Apr 2015, 08:36
joseph0alexander wrote:
Any April round applicant got invited to interview?


Anyone any update? This phase seems lengthy. :-|

Posted from my mobile device
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
How Tuck Helped Me Succeed in the Non-Profit Sector  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Apr 2015, 13:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: How Tuck Helped Me Succeed in the Non-Profit Sector
Image

Image
By Christine Hou T'15

Christine is a second-year student at Tuck pursuing a dual-degree with Harvard Kennedy School. After growing up in Silicon Valley and obtaining a Bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley, she spent her time as a management consultant at Bain & Company in San Francisco. Immediately before matriculating to Tuck, Christine consulted for the Gates Foundation and TechnoServe across East Africa. This past summer she interned with Acumen in Nairobi, focusing on healthcare and education investments. This coming summer she will be interning with the Asian Development Bank in Manila. She is also a dual degree candidate with Harvard Kennedy School’s Masters in Public Administration program.

In a blend of perseverance, time, and Tuck’s deep expertise in the social impact space, I managed to land the very internship I wrote about in my admissions essay and was equipped with the skills to succeed in the role. However, it truly takes a village, and many facets of Tuck were instrumental in the process of getting me to where I am today.

Tuck's Career Development Office (CDO) has been a tremendous support system during my journey. Shout out to Lizzie Napier who was a champion for me for both my summer internships (as a dual-degree student, I have two summer internships to recruit for). During our initial meeting, I told her exactly what I wrote to Tuck almost a year prior—as an ex-consultant and international development worker, I hoped to gain more experience in impact investing. After a lengthy discussion, I left Lizzie’s office with a list of potential contacts and other opportunities. She continuously checked in throughout the years and made sure to help when she could. Just a month ago, on our Global Expedition trip to Armenia and Georgia, she personally introduced me to the regional directors and managers for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. She has been a true mentor, and I cannot imagine having a stronger advocate within Tuck.

Speaking of the Global Expedition, I recently went on the trek to Armenia and Georgia. This trek was specifically focused on international investment in the region, and how financial and strategic assistance from America and others shapes development. We met with the Ambassador, the US Embassy, Center for Disease Control, USAID, Deloitte, Chief of Staff to the President, and other politicians and leading businessmen. It was a truly eye-opening experience. Not only did I bond with my fellow travelers, but I gained a greater understanding of the region and how politics impacts local citizens and businesses – a good foundation from which I can make more informed business decisions later in my career.

The Center for Business & Society with its various initiatives have also influenced my path. Its annual Business & Society Conference connected me with impact investor Nancy Pfund, Managing Director and Founder of DBL Investors, a VC fund that supports firms like Tesla and Pandora. A private dinner with her and my fellow BSC co-chairs proved invaluable in understanding how to raise money for impact funds and how to effectively create value in societies. Pat Palmiotto has also helped create independent studies that build my knowledge base, and as a fellow for the Center, I also have the opportunity to build my own initiative within Tuck.

Net Impact and specifically a T’14 who interned at Acumen previously played the biggest role in securing my internship. The Net Impact Club at Tuck has a mentorship program, and my interests aligned well with a T’14’s previous experience. She spent time looking over my resumes and cover letters, prepping me for the interviews, and putting in a personal word for me. There is no doubt that my internship would not have happened if it weren’t for her and Net Impact’s program.

And last, but certainly not least, the powerful alumni network. Though not as large as some other business schools, the Tuck alumni are extremely responsive—almost all respond within 24 hours, and everyone links me up with other folks to speak with. I can’t speak enough about the alums that have gone out of their way to tell me about their experiences, meet up for coffee, and vouch for me.

I’ve run out of space here, but other parts of Tuck that have enabled me to succeed include my current classmates, the professors, and the coursework. But really, to fully describe how each aspect supported and campaigned for me, I would need the space of a novel! Nonetheless, I hope this helps others understand my journey, and how I could not have done it without being at such a supportive school.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
Building Business from Thin Air: The Start-Up Science of What-To-Do-To  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Apr 2015, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Building Business from Thin Air: The Start-Up Science of What-To-Do-Tomorrow
Image

By Pete Mathias T'16

A first-year student at Tuck, Pete is co-founder of Decade Records and drummer for Filligar, a touring American rock band. He has served as a cultural ambassador for the U.S. State Department and is a voting member of The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences (The GRAMMYs). Pete is a Distinction master’s graduate of Oxford University (MSt, History) and Dartmouth College (BA, Classics).

The ideaman, the self-starter, the creative, the entrepreneur—whatever we call a person wanting to make something from nothing, there is a consistent void in their business thinking: “Tomorrow.” If you have a next-big idea, what action do you take tomorrow?

Seed funding. Series A, B, C.  IPOs. These are the Silicon-sourced, Shark Tank-fueled distractions from the hard work of building business from thin air. As I see it, the entrepreneur science of what-to-do-tomorrow is a rare pedagogy, a sacred knowledge.

Enter a conference room at The Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network (DEN). A banker, a consultant, a nuclear submarine officer, an Air Force chief and myself—a touring musician—are five guys with an idea. Actually, the idea belongs to the Air Force chief and a Dartmouth computer science major, who together developed a mobile app to transform peer-to-peer contact sharing. We have an idea, but what action do we take tomorrow?

The First-Year-Project (FYP) at the Tuck School of Business is instruction in business building when there is nothing but an idea. In the winter, Trip Davis of the Office of Technology Transfer and Tom Naughton of the Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship primed our team in Entrepreneurial Thinking, distilling for us how to develop a comprehensive business model canvas. The takeaway: moving from pen and paper to hammer and nail—or from “smoke and mirrors” to real results as a visiting VC from Andreessen Horowitz put it—requires scientific method.

How to conduct market testing interviews. How to collect meaningful survey data. How to iterate product prototypes. How to find and how to hire a product developer. How to finance it all. The FYP disciplines you in these hypothesis-driven methodologies. 

It is hard to imagine a corporation in its emerging moments. To us, General Electric is NYSE:GE, not Edison tinkering with copper wire and carbon filaments. Disney is rides and films, not a cartoonist with his multiplane camera. 

But there is process for venture. It begins with pen and paper, but without execution know-how and how-to, ideas will forever remain possibilities; not products. As a student of history, I think of it like this: Imagine an ancient Greek architect with blueprints in hand but without any understanding of how to extract multi-ton marble slabs from raw earth, sail them across ocean, then refine, lift, and stack them, column after column, into a temple.

That process of erecting a lasting monument—like a corporation—is not trial and error. It is craft mastered over past efforts. And during Tuck’s First Year Project, we are fortunate to learn business building from some truly remarkable business craftsmen.    

Also: Check out one of my classmates’ start-up First Year Projects, BAE, now in the App-store.

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
Life after the Military: Why an MBA?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Apr 2015, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Life after the Military: Why an MBA?
Image

If you’re transitioning out of your military service, you have a wide array of choices in front of you. Why consider an MBA? Below, four Tuck veterans offer their perspectives on the value an MBA provides and why Tuck was the right school for them. If you would like to learn more about the MBA and Tuck, join us for Tuck's annual Military Visit Day on Monday, May 4, 2015 in Hanover, NH. The day will include a class visit and panels hosted by members of the Admissions Committee, current military students, the Career Development Office, and the Financial Aid Office.

Register today and we'll look forward to seeing you soon!

Steve Janco T’16, US Naval Academy 2008

I was searching for a new set of challenges as I made the decision to transition from the service. While I had genuinely enjoyed my time in the SEAL Teams, I believed that an MBA would serve as the capstone needed to step into the next phase of my career. An MBA allows you to leverage your experiences from the service while developing the critical skills necessary for success in your next endeavor. My experience at Tuck has exceeded every expectation, not only as a student but in my personal life as well. As a student, I am continually amazed by the inclusive environment at Tuck and the caliber of my classmates. There is an immediate sense here that everyone wants to see you succeed and genuinely cares about your short and long-term goals. On a personal level, my wife and children are truly a part of the culture here at Tuck. As a family we enjoy every minute of this experience.

I can promise that you will be valued here and given the opportunity to further develop yourself alongside an amazing group of friends. The Armed Forces Alumni Association as well as the overall Tuck community is here to help, so please reach out as you work through your personal decision making process.

Sara McGuigan T’16, US Coast Guard Academy 2008

Following the expiration of my obligated service, I was faced with a transition point in my life and career. I had a general curiosity to try new things, learn a new skill, and meet new people. I knew that an excellent program would help guide me, and I was very right. Not only have the core classes given me a great business foundation, it has exposed me to so many different industries, companies, and functions that have allowed me to smartly think about what I would like to pursue. On top of that, on a more personal level, faculty, staff, and peers have helped me to make the transition emotionally easy. Their relentless support has allowed me to feel confident in this new venture and highly value the leadership experiences that I bring.

Rob Wilson T’16, Notre Dame 2009

When I made the decision to leave the Navy and pursue other opportunities, business school quickly rose to the top of my list. The complexity of problems you'll face and the responsibilities you'll be given at a company after receiving an MBA are tough to compete with. I pushed myself hard throughout my submarine career to learn everything I could and to gain the respect of those I led; that is a process I feel I'm continuing here at business school. I've been amazed at the diversity of my classmates' experiences. I learn as much outside the classroom through these new friendships as I ever could inside it. Business school has exceeded all my expectations and I recommend a strong consideration of an MBA program for anyone transitioning from the service. Your varied perspective will be valued in the community and you will gain every skill you need to succeed two years later in the job market. I hope this helps you to make an informed decision about your future; reach out to vets and schools and we'll be willing to help.

Max Wunderlich T’16, US Military Academy 2008

Before I committed to leaving the active duty Army, I wanted to have a plan in place for the future. After talking with a number of friends and networking with other veterans who had gotten out, I knew it would be possible to get a job without getting an MBA. However, with the increasing number of junior officers leaving the military, I knew that I needed to find a way to set myself apart in order to get the job that I really wanted, and the MBA was the best way for me to do that. It would arm me with the necessary business skills, and connect me with a helpful and supportive alumni network that would be able to help guide me through my transition and beyond. In the end, the Tuck MBA proved the ideal fit for me and my family, as it allowed me to attain my professional goals in an unmatched community and collaborative environment.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
Tuck International Exchange Program: Studying in India  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Apr 2015, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck International Exchange Program: Studying in India
Image

By Raphael Bonacci T’15

Image
Raphael is a second-year student at Tuck. Prior to coming to Tuck, Raphael worked in corporate development at a specialist insurance group in the United Kingdom, on group strategic initiatives and acquisitions. Raphael started his career in investment banking in London and Paris. He has an MSc in economics and finance from the University of Warwick and an undergraduate degree in economics from Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management.

During winter term, I decided to study abroad at Indian School of Business (ISB) in Hyderabad. Little did I know that I would leave India with a wealth of experiences and amazing new friends! During my exchange, I took a class on managing complexity with a NASA professional, learned about conjoint analysis from one of its pioneers, and used game theory to formulate strategy. On the social side, I attended numerous campus events and epic birthday parties, learned to drive a rickshaw, visited religious and meditation sites, learned about Hindu mythology, attended weddings, and travelled to Rajasthan, Punjab, Tamil Nadu, and Karnataka, not to mention trips abroad to Sri Lanka and Myanmar. Hyderabad is one of the largest cities in the country and has an interesting mix of Indian, Persian, and Arabic influences, which is quite unusual. The city has some of the finest food, from biryanis to delicious yet spicy street food. I can say that my experience in India lived up to my expectations pretty well. It has been a feast and a festival of joy.

After two previous shorter visits to India, I was interested in something more than just visiting the country as a tourist. I came across the exchange program during my first year at Tuck after discussions with the MBA Program Office (MBAPO), second-year Tuck students who completed the exchange, and incoming exchange students from ISB. Aside from my keen interest in globalizing my education, gaining exposure to managerial challenges in one of the fastest growing and largest countries in the world, as well as connecting with the people on another level, I wanted to give myself the privilege to see the world from a completely different perspective.

Studying in India has allowed me to build bridges across cultures in ways that cannot be done otherwise. I’ve learned so much about India from its people by spending just a term abroad. Some of my most memorable experiences were the role-plays for my Negotiation Analysis class. Aside from the benefit of getting to know the students more quickly, the experience has taught me to deliver and receive feedback and to deal with different negotiation styles in a cross-cultural context. I also realized that many people are deterred by the living conditions in India and the chaos often depicted by the media. Interestingly, it’s only when you go beyond the surface and start seeing the people as your peers or friends that you can really appreciate the richness of the culture and the strong sense of community, something that we value so strongly at Tuck and that is rather uncommon elsewhere. In India, I gained exposure to some popular traditions. I attended Lohri, a festival from Punjab, where students typically dance to Punjabi music around a bonfire in January. We also celebrated Holi, an ancient Hindu festival, also called the festival of colors, in March. There were hundreds of students coloring each other with powder and paint, dancing all day long, as well as sharing food and drinks. The International Club and the South Asia Business Association at Tuck are now bringing this event to the Tuck community. I found the interactions with people in India so energizing. It is not uncommon to be invited for dinner or Chai or to join weekend trips. I was stunned by how friendly, curious and inclusive the students were. I was also touched by their generosity, thoughtfulness, open mindedness, sense of humor, and enthusiasm, as well as the authenticity that many demonstrated. It’s been an inspiring journey and a humbling experience.

The process of studying abroad is surprisingly simple but MBA students often don’t seize the opportunity. Some perceive the process as complicated, others fear of missing out from Tuck or are worried about living abroad. Perhaps, some students may simply have never thought about the idea. All students were living on campus in India, making it easy to settle and have quality interactions with other students, and those with a family had access to child care facilities. A significant part of the course offering is taught by visiting professors from other MBA programs, providing consistency with the curriculum at top US business schools. Finally, the cost of living is much lower in India. Tuck students typically rent their room in Hanover to incoming exchange students at Tuck during their stay abroad.

I would recommend every student to spend a term abroad as part of an MBA. While there are many opportunities for Tuck students to globalize their education, especially with the new Tuck Global Insight Requirement,  there are few ways outside the MBA to embrace a culture so closely. The transition back to Tuck was very smooth, aside from having to readapt to the cold weather and the snow. It’s like I’ve never really been away. The MBAPO, the Quality of Life team, and the International Club organized a “Welcome Back” event at Murphy’s to help students returning from abroad reconnect with the Tuck community and share their experience. I’ve picked my spring term classes and my calendar is now again packed with social events and weekend trips until graduation.

Image

Student Village 3, Indian School of Business.

Photo Credit: Jahaan Premji

Image

Sand dunes, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan, January 2015

Image

February 6-8, 2015, trip to Hampi, Karnataka.

Photo Credit: Goutham Reddy

Image

The Charminar and Laad Bazaar, Hyderabad (old city)
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
Can you start a business in the woods?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Apr 2015, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Can you start a business in the woods?
Image

By Justin Gerrard T'16

Image
Justin is co-founder of Bae (Before Anyone Else), a mobile matchmaking app curated for people of color. Bae won first place at the 13th annual Dartmouth Ventures Competition and he will be pursuing the venture full time during the summer. Justin is a graduate of Harvard College (Bachelor of Arts, Anthropology).

I always aspired to be an entrepreneur. From my first lemonade stand in primary school, to an apparel business in college, the notion that I could create a successful business from scratch appealed to me. I guess it’s somewhat in my blood. My maternal grandfather was a serial entrepreneur who started a shoe shine parlor, hot dog stand, ice cream shop, and upholstery business, among numerous other pursuits. Despite never graduating from high school, his tireless work ethic, keen business sense, and affable nature allowed him to put all five of his children through college. My goal was to someday apply that same effort to my own entrepreneurial endeavors, and achieve half of his success.

When I submitted applications to business schools after four years of product marketing experience at Microsoft and American Express, my plan was to use my MBA as an incubator for starting a business. I chose Tuck because of its strong alumni network, the values and quality of its students (Tuckiness), its emphasis on world-class pedagogy, and focus on building out networks of entrepreneurial support—through the organizations like the Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network (DEN) and the Tuck Entrepreneurship Initiative. I believed that the confluence of elements embedded into a Tuck education would allow me to hit the ground running in my first year, and start a business before the end of the summer. I had an idea that I’d been working on with my brother, (a dating app targeted at the African-American community), and decided to run with this concept once I arrived on campus.

When I entered Tuck last fall, the resources afforded me through the school and the broader Dartmouth network exceeded all my expectations. My professors and the administration at Tuck fully committed their time to support my entrepreneurial journey, and the broader Dartmouth community provided alumni mentorship, funding, and co-working space to turn my idea into a business. Moreover, my amazing classmates offered boundless encouragement, which helped me to push through tough times when I thought we would fail to bring the product to market.

On April 1, my team launched our dating app Bae (Before Anyone Else), in front of a crowd of 2,500 students at the historically Black university, Howard University, in Washington, DC. Since our launch, we have had over 15,000 downloads, and recently won first prize at the Dartmouth Ventures competition. Because of Tuck, I can work on my business full time through the summer, have a pipeline of funding, and am pursuing my dream. So, if your question before applying to Tuck is, “Can I actually start my business in the woods?” I hope my story provides a helpful lens into the incredible community and resources we have here.

You can download Bae for iPhone and Android at www.baeapp.co (shameless plug). 

(Photo above: Justin at the 2015 Dartmouth Ventures. Photo by Laura DeCapua.)
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
Women @ Tuck: Growing, Leading, Learning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Apr 2015, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Women @ Tuck: Growing, Leading, Learning
Image

Image
Last  Image
fall, Senior Associate Director of Admissions and head of women’s recruitment Pat Harrison, sat down with the President of Tuck’s Women in Business Club, Lindsey Windham, to talk about her experience as a woman at Tuck. While this blog highlights some of Lindsey’s points, it certainly doesn’t capture her palpable enthusiasm for Tuck. We encourage you to listen to their full conversation here.

Pat and Lindsey first discussed some common concerns that Lindsey initially had as an applicant from a non-traditional background. As Pat explains, however, her concerns were actually misconceptions. You can still be incredibly successful in business school even if you come from a non-traditional background and/or you have non-traditional post-MBA career goals.

You are not alone!

Lindsey came to Tuck having gained all her work experience in the public sector. Specifically, in education management and even as a classroom English teacher as part of Teach for America. She chose to pursue her MBA to develop her skills as a leader and to learn about how the private sector and technology can help transform struggling public institutions.

Lindsey soon discovered that her classmates came from a wide variety of backgrounds: some traditional (like finance and consulting) and others non-traditional (like the military and health care). In fact, Tuck’s Admissions Committee specifically aims for a student body with a diversity of industry, function, and education backgrounds. If everyone had the same perspective, there wouldn’t be any fresh ideas!

Lindsey realized quickly that her “non-traditional background” had positioned her well for an MBA, and that she had a lot of real-world experience to offer to her classmates through the study group and in the MBA classroom setting.

 

Why did you choose Tuck?

Lindsey wanted a place where she could immerse herself in her courses and community. Tuck stood out as a place to develop true, lasting connections built on learning, relationships, and a shared experience. She also knew the small scale would provide an opportunity to take on larger leadership roles and proactively push new initiatives forward to impact the school. Some other important to her were Tuck’s incredible alumni network, which represent life-long professional connections.  Lindsey found Tuck a collaborative place where students do aim to “help everyone achieve more.”

Image

Resources at Tuck

In addition to classmates, there are a number of people and offices at Tuck who serve as resources to Tuck students.  Tuck’s Career Development Office, for instance, help Lindsey connect with several alumni in the Bay area during an exploratory recruitment trip she took in the fall of her second year.

She took advantage of the variety of resources within the MBA Program Office, including the tutoring program. The MBAPO coordinates tutoring, plans events, assists student clubs, and processes student feedback to make the student experience even better. Also falling under the MBAPO purview are first-year study groups, which are comprised of students from diverse industries, functions, and geographies. Lindsey calls hers a huge reason why she was so successful in the fall core.

Finally, Lindsey cites the unparalleled access Tuck students have to the faculty. At Tuck, faculty are available to students to ensure students are getting the most out of each course. They have an open door policy across the board. Lindsey has developed relationships with faculty who she feels are authentically invested in her as a student and in her career.

In the Classroom

Lindsey calls her experience in the classroom at Tuck “incredibly positive.” She came in wanting to challenge herself to get involved and be engaged in class discussion. Like everyone, she was nervous about the infamous cold call, but soon realized that everyone (male or female) contributes to class discussions. She found the atmosphere to be a supportive, non-critical one, where it’s perfectly OK to ask questions, challenge a classmate, or get something wrong as long as the discussion is enriched by the dialogue.

Tuck Involvement

Lindsey, like many of her classmates, is highly involved outside the classroom as well. She’s in the Tuck Band (relishing the chance to unleash her inner pop-star), serves as a Leadership Fellow within the Center for Leadership (an opportunity to contribute to topics such as Women in the C-Suite), and she’s on the Student Board Quality of Life Committee (in a position that’s dedicated to student and faculty engagement outside the classroom).

Perhaps Lindsey’s most impactful roles are as president of the Women in Business Club and co-chair of Tuck’s Initiative for Women. She outlines the three primary ways WIB carries out its mission to build an inclusive community that supports and enables women to achieve everything they hope to at Tuck:

• Helping to prepare each other for careers.

• Creating an environment for dialogue on gender equality.

• Strengthening our community of women.

The Initiative for Women was founded on the belief that Tuck is, and can continue to be, the best place for a woman to obtain a graduate business education. I4W was student created, with lots of staff and faculty support. Its goal is to ensure that Tuck is the school of choice for women wanting MBAs, the best place for MBA women, and will also serve as a place for gender research and gender based programming.

After Tuck

Image
Lindsey started her career search at Tuck with a desire to explore her options. With her interest in technology, she spent the summer between first- and second-year doing an internship at Amazon. She says that Tuck gave her the confidence to look at a high-level strategic project and tackle it head on.

After graduation, Lindsey plans to move to Seattle and go back to Amazon as part of the Retail Leadership Development program.

Lindsey’s Advice

Pay attention as a prospective; be present when you’re visiting campus and meeting alums & students.

• Tell your story in an authentic way.

Go with your gut when deciding which school to attend, which internship to take, and which full-time offer to pursue.

• When you get to a new place, new phase, or new job, believe that you belong – you can truly do anything, so use your time in business school to pursue your dreams.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
A New Perspective on Health Care: The Netherlands GIX at the TIAS Scho  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Apr 2015, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: A New Perspective on Health Care: The Netherlands GIX at the TIAS School for Business and Society
Image

By Eric Giles T’16, Robin Daley T’16, and Bryan Pyfer T’16

Ten students traveled to the Netherlands over spring break to attend a Global Insight Expedition (GIX) led by Bob Hansen, senior associate dean and the Norman W. Martin 1925 Professor of Business Administration. Global Insight Expeditions offer students opportunities to travel to a variety of countries to learn how business is done around the world. They learn about each country's unique business environment, opportunities for social entrepreneurship, and the role of business people in addressing social challenges.

These three students offer their biggest takeaways from their time in the Netherlands.

Eric T’16

Image
Eric is a career switcher who transitioned from an education nonprofit—Teach For America—to the health care sector. He hopes to expand health access to all populations.

I came to Tuck knowing that I would pursue a career in making health care a more equitable industry. Like any other business entity, health care is a global concern and, like any business leader, I wanted to break out of my domestic bubble and understand how other nations are thinking about shared problems. Part of operating in the global economy means sharing information across borders and languages, and the GIX trip to the Netherlands gave me opportunities to learn from international experts that far exceeded my expectations.

The trip is a partnership between Tuck and the TIAS School for Business and Society, a top business school in the Netherlands. TIAS lined up some truly thought-provoking speakers who challenged my thinking around a range of issues. My team had deep conversations with a CEO around his assumptions about incentives, watched a former CERN scientist explain how he is using data to predict health outcomes, and engaged an ethics expert in a discussion around the Netherland’s position on euthanasia. Connecting with experts and diving to the root of issues is what business school is all about, and as I move into my career, I will leverage the perspectives and lessons of the Dutch people.

Here are my top three takeaways:

  • Cultural values inform the health policies of a nation. Given the stickiness of cultural values, health care must be designed around them.
  •  Addressing the care for a quickly aging population is a common global problem, and one which no country truly has an answer to yet.
  • The Netherlands provides vastly more care and choice at a lower cost. It reaffirmed that there is a lot of waste and misaligned incentives in the U.S. system.

Robin T'16

Image
Robin grew up in Bar Harbor, Maine. Prior to Tuck, he worked as a consultant at Charles River Associates in Boston. At Tuck, Robin is a Revers Board Fellow for the Upper Valley Haven, is a mentor for Vermont Everybody Wins!, and is co-chair of the Basketball Club. This summer, he will spend his internship at Gilbarco Veeder-Root, an operating company of Danaher Corporation.

I found the lectures by Dr. Freek Lapré—senior lecturer at TIAS and founder of Movinex BV—and Professor Loek Winter—renowned health care entrepreneur in the Netherlands—to be intriguing. Both believed that the amount of government involvement in the Netherlands should be reduced and seemed to be motivated by developments in the United States. Dr. Lapré spoke to the need for the Netherlands to move towards a more “participative” society and for long-term care facilities to develop the service standards maintained in the United States. Professor Winter’s entrepreneurialism with regard to creating focused and specialized care centers reminded me of the success CVS Health has had in the United States with Minute Clinics. However, the fact that the transfer of medical records between health care organizations is illegal in the Netherlands seems to create a problem for these specialized centers. Additionally, I found Professor Winter’s statement of “I don’t believe in non-profit organizations” to be particularly powerful in the context of the “solidarity” perspective that is prevalent in the Netherlands.

During the tour of Philips research headquarters in Eindhoven, I was also struck by Professor Nardo van der Meer’s—cardiovascular anesthesiologist and intensivist at the Amphia Hospital Breda—comment with regard to MRI waiting times in the Netherlands being a result of limited service hours; not a lack of machines. Dean Robert Hansen, who led our GIX, contrasted this with the airline industry, which gets as much utilization from its investment in fixed costs as possible by offering red-eye flights. While health care utilization in the United States is far from a 24/7 industry, I was able to receive an MRI for a non-critical condition at 10:30 p.m. the day of my visit to an orthopedic specialist last year.

The Netherlands GIX has taught me that while the United States health care system receives a lot of criticism, there are many positive aspects that are influencing other countries.

Bryan T’16

Image
Bryan is an MD/MBA candidate with a background in sales and health care consulting. I am interested in health care innovation, technology, and consumerism. After Tuck, I plan on a career as a surgeon and health care entrepreneur.

“Here in the Netherlands, we have our rights. In the U.S., you have your benefits.” This seemed to be a common theme throughout our visit as we discussed the general tenets of the Dutch health care system. Before today, I understood that social services were a high priority in Europe, but I guess I didn’t appreciate to what extent. This idea of health care being a right seems to permeate much deeper than just who provides health care—it essentially has dictated health care laws (individual mandates), determined insurance corporate structure (not-for-profit) and pricing (a flat rate percentage of income), and care delivery (basic minimum package of services with a flat deductible for every insured citizen). The CEO of CZ remarked, “Nobody in this country goes bankrupt because of medical expenses.”

It is impressive to me how organized the Dutch government is around this idea. This has made me think about what is keeping the United States from moving in this direction? Is it the “Live Free or Die” mentality that makes people uncomfortable when the government imposes mandates like this? Is it the growing federal deficit that makes it unaffordable? Can the Netherlands do it because they are such a small country and are thus more nimble to meet the needs of its citizens? Whatever the reason, I am impressed with the government’s commitment to universal health coverage.

Hear from other Tuckies on their Global Insight Expeditions: Israel, South Africa, and Japan.

Image

Image
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
ASW: A Glimpse Into the Next Two Years of Your Life  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 May 2015, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: ASW: A Glimpse Into the Next Two Years of Your Life
Image

By Allyson Himelstein, Tuck Partner (TP) '16

Image
Allyson works at Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth in the career services, communication, and advancement departments. Before moving to the Upper Valley, she worked as a recruiter in Manhattan and guest lectured at NYU's Career Center. While she misses New York’s food scene and architecture, she’s fallen in love with her new life in the Upper Valley. She recently bought ski gear and has learned to appreciate snow—and lots of it, at that! She loves to read memoirs, explore cities, is an outspoken book club participant, and is currently learning how to cook.

After some preliminary research (e.g. reading and viewing photographs from previous blog posts about Admitted Students Weekend from 2011 onward), I am fairly certain that the MBA Program Office and the weather are working together to ensure that Admitted Students Weekend (ASW) is consistently glorious. Let me explain.

Last year, I was shocked to experience perfect weather April 18–20. And, by perfect, I mean 70 degrees and sunny the entire time (excluding the evenings, of course). I thought the perfect weather was an isolated event. But, no—the same thing happened this year. My Yahoo Weather app predicted that it would be crummy, rainy, and grey for this year’s ASW. But, guess what? It wasn't. Of course, ASW isn't just about the weather, although it does help make Tuck even more enticing. ASW is about the glimpse into the next two years of your life. Hand on heart, this glimpse is pretty super.

When my boyfriend and I boarded the Dartmouth Coach from Manhattan to Hanover for ASW one year ago, I was nervous and had no idea what to expect. In hindsight, this was helpful because life is really all about moderating expectations. The moment we got off the bus, gaggles of current students in matching t-shirts welcomed us with cheer and food from The Box. What’s The Box you ask? It’s just an exceptional food truck founded by a TP’15, and has a ubiquitous presence at Dartmouth to boot. I chose a falafel pita sandwich with homemade hummus and felt like I was at home. This year, I missed lunch because I was working—thank you Thayer School of Engineering—and raced back to Sachem Village to begin preparing dinner for our prospective students. It’s impossible for me to choose what my favorite part of ASW is, but small group dinners (FYI: these continue) are high up there. When current students grill flank steaks outside and bake gooey chocolate brownies for you, break out Settlers of Catan—Tuck students are obsessed with this game—Swiffer their floors, and utilize creative ice breakers to learn about who you are, it feels good. It feels like a community. It makes you want to be here.

Everyone says the following about Tuck: “These will be the best two years of your life.” And, “Yes, everyone is this friendly.” These statements are true. They have also produced a moderate degree of sadness within me.  I love it here so much that I have started counting down the months until it’s all over. I recognize that this is unhealthy and not in the least bit productive, but I do it all the same. For me, ASW—the informative panels, conversations while hiking, inclusiveness, the band party, the international lunch (fried PB&J, a variety of dumplings from Russia, shepherd’s pie, mango lassi, MEAT, etc.) wide-eyed and exhilarated T’17s and TP’17s, and the hundreds of salted oat chocolate chip cookies from the Box—made me realize how quickly time has passed. I have relished in every moment, and I will try to live in the present until next year’s ASW, when I will surely cry of nostalgia and jealousy of the incoming class of 2018.

(Photo above: The international lunch at Tuck during ASW. Photo by Laura DeCapua.)
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
Ask Dawna: I’m a few years from applying. What can I do now?  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 May 2015, 05:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Ask Dawna: I’m a few years from applying. What can I do now?
Image

In the video below, Tuck Director of Admissions Dawna Clarke offers tips and advice for current undergraduate students and recent grads who are considering eventual pursuit of an MBA.

As you think about getting an MBA down the road, keep in mind that most business schools look for a diverse student body with a wide range of industry and functional experience. As you begin your career and consider different positions, do what you're passionate about. Look for opportunities for progression, and chances to manage people, budgets, and projects.

Similarly, we recommend getting involved in activities and with organizations that you're passionate about outside of work as well. Commit to a few things, rather than several that are short lived.

Other tips include looking for global experiences to differentiate yourself within the applicant pool, preparing for (and taking) the GMAT before things get really busy, and starting to research schools early. By thinking about these things now, you're putting yourself in an excellent position to stand out within an impressive applicant pool. As you continue moving toward "submit," keep reading this blog, talk to students and alumni when you can, and please reach out to us with questions. 

If you have a question you would like us to consider for an upcoming "Ask Dawna" video, please post it in the comments section of this or any of the "Ask Dawna" posts. Thanks for reading and good luck! 

 

ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
What We Learned: Tuckies Reflect on India Global Insight Expedition (G  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 May 2015, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: What We Learned: Tuckies Reflect on India Global Insight Expedition (GIX)
Image

Eighteen students traveled to India over spring break for a Global Insight Expedition (GIX) led by Amit Bhattacharjee, visiting assistant professor of business administration, and Sudershan “Suds” Tirumala T’10. Global Insight Expeditions offer students opportunities to travel to a variety of countries to learn how business is done around the world. They learn about each country's unique business environment, opportunities for social entrepreneurship, and the role of business people in addressing social challenges.

These eight students offer their biggest takeaways from their time in India.

Erin Wall T’15 and Jun Jiang T’15

During our time in Mumbai, we paid a visit to Viacom 18 which is a 50/50 joint venture created in 2007 between Viacom, Inc. from the U.S. and India’s Network18 Group. Viacom 18 was a great case study for us on how to customize a global brand for success in a new market. While Viacom 18 imports many programs directly from the U.S., it also tailors much of its content to appeal to the diverse viewership in India. To highlight this, our Viacom 18 host showed us a map of India divided by regions, marked with cultural and language preferences of each region.

By the time we arrived at Viacom 18, we had already noticed the importance of television in India; even in the poorest slums, there are satellite dishes for digital programming on top of each roof. As both viewership and population continue to expand, media companies such as Viacom 18 need to increasingly consider how to create business opportunities and best address the needs of the customers at the bottom of the pyramid. This experience not only helped us learn about the Indian consumer, but it also helped put into context the theories and concepts we learned in our operations, marketing, and strategy courses.

Jaimie Sarrault T’15 and Jorge Seldner Torres T’15

During our stay in Kolkata, we visited a large conglomerate called ITC that began as the Imperial Tobacco Company and has since grown and diversified its businesses to include both hospitality and CPG industries. In the afternoon we visited the ITC Sonar luxury hotel and were blown away by both the presentation given by the organization and the tour of the facilities, including one of the water treatment plants located below the hotel. The presentation started with an exceptional speaker, Nazeeb Arif, vice president of corporate communications at ITC Limited. A great storyteller, he knew exactly how to engage us Image
throughout the presentation, beginning with an overview of ITC’s strategy and its successful eChoupal network, an initiative which has been recognized by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for supporting and promoting agriculture and small rural farm workers, empowering rural women, and providing rural supplementary education. We left the presentation contemplating how it could make sense that a tobacco company is able to set the stage so well for sustainable luxury.

Beyond the engaging presentation, we were able to compare and contrast the culture of an Indian conglomerate, ITC, and other foreign multinational companies we visited throughout our stay in India. In general it seemed employees demonstrated more passion when they worked at an Indian conglomerate. An example illustrating this was the manager of food and beverages we visited at ITC Sonar who started working at the company when he was 18 years old who mentioned that he “could not picture himself working at another company.” This passion for working at an Indian company was something we perceived across our company visits during the India GIX.

Sarah Reynolds T’15 and Christina Pluta T’15

While in a rural village near Bangalore, we visited several local craftsmen including a potter and silk spinners. Both professions have been passed on from parents to children for generations, as is the case with many traditional handicrafts. However, throughout India many of these craftsmen are currently struggling financially and as such their children are not interested in pursuing their parent’s trade. The government of India subsidizes many such professions in effort to keep them alive. 

Our experience talking to the potter and his son proved to be a fascinating exception. When we asked the potter’s son, who had learned the profession, if he was hopeful about his future as a Image
potter he beamed ear to ear and beckoned us to follow. We walked into another potting room filled with clay pots shoulder high. He explained he once received an order for an enormous pot, and was curious what purpose such a huge vessel would serve. So he followed up with the patron and learned it was to be a tandoori oven for a restaurant. This enterprising young potter decided to become an expert at making these ovens-to-be. Now his creations ship all over India and into Nepal. How does he sell his masterpieces? Google of course.

Innovation in India and the ways business is executed across such varied cultural and economic realities was a topic we discussed regularly throughout the trip. This vignette beautifully encapsulated a young generation’s ability to adapt and expand on the body of existing knowledge, thereby making it relevant and available in a global marketplace.

Jeremy Reich T’16 and Kevin Friedenberg T’16

Our second full day in Bangalore began with a set of field visits to help us understand the social dynamics surrounding urban middle-class consumers in India. Splitting into three groups, we had the opportunity to visit a local pharmacy and public hospital, a set of consumer homes, and the Spastics Society of Karnataka, a foundation providing education and care to disabled children.

Our glimpses into the social fabric of Bangalore were eye-opening. All three visits underscored that day-to-day life is a challenge for the average urban middle-class consumer and that institutions are still catching up to support quality of life across income levels. However, they also showed glimmers of hope: a set of hardworking individuals pouring themselves into creating a brighter tomorrow and measuring their progress day-by-day.

The experiences of field visits in the morning and a visit to an electronics company in the afternoon once again reminded us of the many Indias captured within the borders of the country. In the morning, we saw the India of the middle class urban consumer—one characterized by hard work with an optimistic future, where infrastructural gaps served as reminders of the ground still left to cover. In the afternoon, we saw the India of a successful corporation, trying to do its best to help its community—in some cases, the same people with whom we met in the morning—within the constraints of an arguably shortsighted regulatory policy. While the two visits were merely kilometers apart, their thematic distance helped us all begin to see the unfathomable depth of complexity in relating different players in such a dynamic society.

Hear from other Tuckies on their Global Insight Expeditions: Israel, South Africa, Japan, and the Netherlands.

Image

Image

Image

 

Image
Erin Wall T’15
graduated from the College of the Holy Cross with majors in economics and mathematics.  Before Tuck, she worked in corporate finance at EMC Corporation and at Bausch + Lomb.  Following her first year at Tuck, Erin interned in the Corporate Development Program at Liberty Mutual and is excited to return to Liberty Mutual full time post-graduation.  At Tuck, she has enjoyed playing tripod hockey, co-chairing Tuck Grooves (the dance club), teaching first graders about business as a volunteer for Junior Achievement and spending as much time as possible in the great outdoors of New Hampshire!

 

Image
Jun Jiang T’15
was born in Beijing. She grew up in Southern California and studied international relations and physics at Stanford University. Before Tuck, she worked as an auditor, saving taxpayer money in the California state government. After Tuck, she will be working in investment banking for Bank of America Merrill Lynch in the technology, media, and telecommunications group.

 

Image
Jaimie Sarrault T’15
is a second-year student at Tuck. Prior to receiving her MBA, Jaimie worked in automotive consulting in Detroit, serving General Motors’ dealer network planning and investments group as a strategic analyst. Growing up in northern Michigan, Jaimie went on to receive her undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan in industrial and operations engineering with a minor in international studies. Last summer, Jaimie interned with Intermountain Healthcare where she worked in operations improvement, program development, strategy, and financial impact analysis. Outside of the classroom, Jaimie enjoys Tuck tripod hockey, volleyball, soccer, cooking, and admiring the beauty of the Upper Valley.

 

Image
Jorge Seldner Torres T’15
is originally from Hermosillo, Mexico. He studied engineering, receiving a double-degree from Tec de Monterrey (Mexico) and Aalborg University (Denmark). Before arriving in Hanover, he was living in the fascinating Mexico City. He started his professional career in the manufacturing industry and then transitioned to commercial banking. This past summer, Jorge interned at CVS’ pharmacy strategy group. At Tuck, he is co-chair of the General Management Club and is an admissions sssociate. Outside the classroom, Jorge enjoys skiing, playing tripod hockey, and traveling to new places. After graduation, he will return to CVS strategy group.

 

Image
Sarah Reynolds T’15
has taken full advantage of every global experiential education program at Tuck: traveling to India and China for GIX trips, Uruguay for Global OnSite Consulting, and leading a first year project (FYP) with the Turtle Mountain band of Chippewa.  She spent her summer internship at Microsoft. Before Tuck, she lived in San Francisco where she thrived working in sales and marketing for an industry disrupting tech start-up. She studied anthropology and Spanish literature at Colgate University and is a Tuck Business Bridge graduate ’06.

 

Image
Christina Pluta T’15
has over eight years of experience as an investment analyst, covering both equity and high yield corporate bonds. This past summer she interned with an investment bank in the health care M&A practice where she developed industry analysis, co-created the confidential information memorandum, and assisted in material review meetings with the client for the sale of a leading medical device company. She spent her recent winter break on the commercial team at a biotech startup working on various strategic projects, which included creating a competitive intelligence tracking process from scratch. She has a degree in cellular & molecular biology and is co-chair of the Tuck Healthcare Club.

 

Image
Following undergraduate studies at Columbia University, Jeremy Reich T’16 remained in New York City and worked as a management consultant and—more recently—a strategist for a primary research firm. At Tuck, he is involved with the Revers Energy Initiative and the Center for Business & Society—two groups which, in overlap, represent his aspirations post-Tuck. As a Connecticut native, Jeremy feels at home in the mountains of New England and tries to hike and be outdoors as much as possible.

 

Image
Originally from Needham, MA, Kevin Friedenberg T’16 graduated from Swarthmore College in 2010 and spent four years as a management consultant prior to coming to Tuck. For his summer internship, Kevin will be working directly for Siemens USA CEO Eric Spiegel T’87 as a member of the business development and strategy Team. He enjoys playing ice hockey, spending time on the Connecticut River, and raising his puppy.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
How I Landed A Summer Internship at Siemens USA  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 May 2015, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: How I Landed A Summer Internship at Siemens USA
Image

By Kevin Friedenberg T'16

Image
Originally from Needham, MA, Kevin Friedenberg graduated from Swarthmore College in 2010 and spent four years as a management consultant prior to coming to Tuck.  For Kevin, Tuck represented an opportunity to switch careers, with the goal of joining a company’s internal strategy team or leadership development program. This summer, Kevin will be working directly for Siemens USA CEO Eric Spiegel T’87 as a member of the business development and strategy team. He enjoys playing ice hockey, spending time on the Connecticut River, and raising his puppy.   

Carpe Diem: An Anecdote on Internship Recruiting

It’s pretty amazing to take a moment and reflect upon how all the small decisions that you have made throughout your life and career have amplified over time to lead you to where you stand right now. When Tuck alumnus and current Siemens USA CEO Eric Spiegel T’87 came to speak to our Analysis for General Managers course this fall, his introspection on a successful career as a consultant and as the leader of a $22B business, suggested to me that he also reflected in this way. 

One particular “leadership lesson learned” that Eric touched upon was the importance of being able to recognize and seize opportunities as they arise. It was during this presentation that Eric himself issued an opportunity to the Class of 2016. He mentioned that if, during his discussion on some of the key challenges his business was facing, students had a few strategic points that they felt might help him address these challenges, that we should write them down on a piece of paper and turn them in to him after the talk. Eric would then pick a few papers that resonated with him and invite these students to potentially interview for his personal internship in Washington, D.C. this coming summer. 

Following the wise words of Wayne Gretzky—“you miss 100% of the shots that you don’t take”—I decided to share my perspectives.  

Three months later, I accepted an offer to join Eric’s team for the summer and remove myself from the recruiting processes of the other companies that I was interested in. But as I reflect upon what ultimately led me to this amazing opportunity, what were the key lessons that I learned?

Take advantage of the opportunities that visiting companies provide you

Perhaps the most important thing that I have learned during the course of internship recruiting is that Tuck creates an unbelievable amount of opportunities for students. Whether it is a visiting executive having dinner with a group of a students, a company hosting a happy hour at Murphy’s, or even just the chance to sit down and have coffee with alumni on-campus, Tuck can really open a lot of doors for its students. The key though, is taking the initiative to walk through those doors. These are the types of small decisions that Tuckies must make during their first-year recruiting efforts—and it is not uncommon for these decisions to lead to further networking opportunities, interviews, and potentially offers.

Keep an open mind regarding industries and companies during the internship search

The summer before coming to Tuck, one T’15 gave me an invaluable piece of advice. She said to explore 5 – 10 companies that I had either never heard of or would never have thought about working for previously. During the course of recruiting I was amazed by how outgoing, passionate, and candid the Tuck alumni who return for recruiting activities are. These interactions really enabled me to learn about different industries, functional roles, and cultures. Having the chance to experience so many different companies during the fall also helped me understand and hone which criteria were truly important to me when selecting firms and positions to apply to. 

Leverage the resources the school gives you access to

Many students take the opportunity to pursue their MBA as a way to help them switch careers into different industries or functional roles. Given how hectic the fall term is, this can be a stressful time—but fortunately we students do not walk alone. Before even coming to Tuck, the Career Development Office provides its students with a few different diagnostic tools to help first-years explore potential careers and cultural styles. Coupling the results of these assessments with individual counseling sessions with members of the CDO allowed me to figure out the types of companies that fit my criteria and suggested the names of several alumni that I should reach out to in order to learn more. Organized career-oriented treks to NYC and Minneapolis also allowed me to experience these companies first-hand.  Even so, nobody at the school will force you into these activities, you must decide for yourself which you want to take advantage of and why.

While internship recruiting can seem like a daunting task amidst a busy fall term, it is also a hugely valuable way to learn about companies and careers and to meet Tuck alumni. My two cents would be to have fun during it, and use this unique environment to help you find the opportunities that interest you the most.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
Top Four Things I Learned from Planning & Attending Admitted Students   [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 May 2015, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Top Four Things I Learned from Planning & Attending Admitted Students Weekend
Image

By Kiley Winsnes T'16

Image
Kiley is a first-year student at Tuck. Before arriving in Hanover, she was living in stunning San Francisco and working for an integration software company. Originally from Chicago, Kiley spent her formative years in Seattle before chasing the California sunshine for her undergraduate degree in economics and religious studies. After Tuck, she hopes to get a job that combines two of her passions: fitness and technology. Outside of the classroom, Kiley enjoys running, road biking, writing, and the beverages of her two home cities: coffee and wine. Kiley can be contacted at kiley.j.winsnes.tu16@tuck.dartmouth.edu. Follow her on Twitter at @kileywins.

Now, I bet you’re thinking, “four?” “Top four things” you learned? That’s random. But think about it, four is such an underutilized number. People are always making “Top 5” and “Top 3” lists—don’t you think four feels left out? Yeah. So let’s give four some much-needed attention. Also, it’s how many lessons came to mind, so, there’s that.

4. When it comes to business school, it’s best to check your ego at the door.

This lesson isn’t necessarily limited to ASW, but it definitely made itself even more apparent during the planning phases. At a place like Tuck, you’re surrounded by people who are accomplished, driven, compassionate, generous, good looking (yep, I said it, my classmates are pretty); in other words … perfect. They’re ex-MLS players from another continent going into investment banking who can have you halfway out of your chair laughing in class. They’re ex-Navy SEALs who are incredible fathers and landed their dream job at Bain but still make time to help a classmate prep for case interviews. They’re ex-Peace Corps volunteers who are earning a dual degree but won’t hesitate to spend a few hours tutoring a friend, then share a tear-inducing speech about their life-changing experiences abroad. Not a bad lot to be around. The thing is, to get to business school, especially one like Tuck, you kind of have to have done some pretty impressive things, so you come into school thinking you’re a bit of a hot shot (and you are!), but quickly realize you’re an ice cube compared to some of your classmates (work with me on the metaphor, people, I’m trying).

When it came to ASW, this sort of ego-crushing experience happened all the time. I chaired a few committees, thinking that my experience and title meant I was the one with all the expertise. Ha. I couldn’t have been more wrong. Instantly I realized the volunteers I selected to lead my committees were all far more qualified for the task, had insanely creative ideas, and were absolute work horses when it came to execution. Any illusion I had of bestowing my wisdom or being needed were quickly dashed. Instead, my committees ran with their responsibilities, delivered way above and beyond anyone’s expectations, and did it more gracefully and competently than I ever could have. Ego: checked.

3. Buy more T-shirts.

Don’t worry, I didn’t mix up my blog list and my to-do list, this is a real lesson. To explain: Here at Tuck, we have a rich tradition of buying t-shirts for just about everything. First-year section wars? T-shirts. Blacklight party? T-shirts. Conference? T-shirts. Winter Carnival? T-shirts. An excessively large group of students going on a completely Tuck-unrelated trip to Costa Rica? T-shirts. So, of course, ASW would require T-shirts. The next logical question was “how many t-shirts”? Well, we knew we would want the volunteers to wear them during the weekend. What we didn’t realize was just how many volunteers there would be.

ASW is a very volunteer-heavy event. There was the core planning team comprised of four co-chairs, who together led twelve committees, each of which had one or two leads, who were tasked with building out teams of up to ten volunteers. Yeah, it starts to sound like a 7th-grade math problem, right? And this was just the planning team. That doesn’t include the folks who graciously offered their homes for students to stay for the weekend, hosted groups for dinners, led optional activities, and much, much more. There were so many tasks and so many volunteers that we failed to keep track of them all, and committed the ultimate Tuck sin: We ran out of t-shirts. So, lesson learned: When it comes to a Tuck event, you’ll have way more volunteers than you bargained for; plan accordingly.

2. Tuck admits some very, very impressive people.

This one is a little repetitive to point four, where I already bragged about my current classmates, but is also a more explicit call out to the incoming class of 2017. Our admissions team reads off some class stats during the first day, at which point I basically gave up on ever being anywhere close to as accomplished as you people. Seriously, the class of 2017 is out of control.

Together, they speak 59 languages; one of them is a member of the West Point Parachute Team (i.e. jumps out of planes for a living) and has completed over 400 jumps; one of them literally helped found a political party in Romania; 26 of them were captains of college sports (yes, college, like, legitimate athletic teams); and one of them, for their actual profession, manages a nuclear reactor on an aircraft carrier. I wouldn’t even be qualified to manage a bathroom on an aircraft carrier. So, yeah, these are some pretty impressive people. As for me? I’m patting myself on the back just for being here; after all, it’s not what you know …

1. Tuck really is as special as people say.

I know I say this a lot, but I’m not even close to sorry for it. I feel incredibly lucky to be a member of this community, and I will brag about how amazing it is every chance I get. Lucky for you, every blog post I write is one of those chances!

The moment that best captures this lesson for me happened Saturday afternoon of ASW. I was walking toward our international lunch event a few hours before it was scheduled to begin, expecting to arrive to an empty venue and to be overwhelmed with the work still to be done. I should have known better.

Instead, what I saw was enough to bring me to tears (and no, it wasn’t from the grill smoke).  Dozens of my classmates and their Tuck Partners from countries around the world were already hard at work: Brazilians and Argentines were flipping massive pieces of steak on the grill, Indians were carrying bowls splashing with mango Lassi, Chinese and Russians balanced trays laden with steamed buns, little ones (Tiny Tuckies) were laughing and screaming, dodging their parents and the tables of food, and above it all Brazilian music blared. In other words, it was like an international Pleasantville had set itself up on campus and I had arrived just in time for lunch. Try to imagine it from my perspective: here were people willing to spend their entire day working for an event that had no impact on them, willing to spend hours in the kitchen and at the grill cooking and serving food to admitted students simply because they believe Tuck really is the best MBA program in the world. That kind of pride, generosity, and community simply don’t happen other places, and that’s precisely why I’m so humbled to be a part of this one.

(Photo above: Students share a laugh during an ASW panel. Photo by Laura DeCapua.)
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
A Tuck Partner Who Took Her Career to the Next Level  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 May 2015, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: A Tuck Partner Who Took Her Career to the Next Level
Image

By Kayla Greenberg, Tuck Partner (TP) '16

Image
Kayla is a TP'16 who moved from Boston to the Upper Valley with her husband Eliav Kahan. She now works at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC) as a nurse practitioner in pediatric neurology. She is an avid member of the book club, wine club, and enjoys exploring the beautiful outdoors of the Upper Valley.

I recently had a moment. I was attending a video conference between my colleagues at Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth (ChaD) and the Mayo Clinic. Neurology, neurosurgery, and neuropsychology team members were discussing an eight-year-old with refractory epilepsy and whether she was a good candidate for surgery. When you imagine the job a supportive wife takes during her husband’s two-year business school stint, you typically don’t envision a cutting edge learning experience in pediatric neurology.

When my husband and I decided to move to Hanover for business school, it was important for me to find both relevant and meaningful work for the two years that we’d be here. I wanted the opportunity to advance my career while my husband was doing the same. I’m a pediatric nurse practitioner and had been working in Boston area hospitals in pediatric primary care for the past two years.

Tuck has a reputation for being very partner-friendly. The spring before we moved, Tuck connected me with the recruitment team at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC). Over the next few months, the job fell into place. I remember interviewing over the summer and looking out the window onto the lush, verdant mountains. This was very different from the congestion and tall buildings of the city skyline. I excitedly texted my husband, “Will we stay here forever!?” 

I now work at DHMC, a twenty minute walk through the woods from our home, and a far cry from the hour plus commute I dealt with in the city. My role in the outpatient pediatric neurology clinic allows me to see children and adolescents with a host of neurologic problems. This is a new specialty for me and I’m learning a great deal, particularly about seizure disorders and migraines. While it’s difficult and I often feel the pull between my job and everything else going on at Tuck and in the Upper Valley, I am drawn in by the challenging work. I know the two (or more) years I spend up here will not be idle time. I am thrilled to be actively growing as a clinician as well as furthering my knowledge and skills as a health care provider. What began as a plan to support my husband on his professional path has become the career move that takes my skills to the next level and pushes me far beyond what I had envisioned.

(Photo above by Mark Washburn)
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Status: Waiting
Joined: 22 Jan 2015
Posts: 56
Location: United States
Concentration: Healthcare, Marketing
GMAT 1: 660 Q47 V34
GMAT 2: 680 Q48 V35
GPA: 3.37
WE: Engineering (Health Care)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 May 2015, 04:12
Tuck Summer Visit Day

Anyone else received invitation for summer visit day june 26th? Email says invitation only event. Not sure what that suggests. I was an R4 applicant and still waiting to hear back. Is that a subtle indication to "Try next year"?
_________________
May the odds be ever in your favor.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 377
“The Best Trip of My Life”–Georgia and Armenia Global Insight Expediti  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 May 2015, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: “The Best Trip of My Life”–Georgia and Armenia Global Insight Expedition
Image

Twenty-three students traveled to Georgia and Armenia over spring break for a Global Insight Expedition (GIX). Global Insight Expeditions offer students opportunities to travel to a variety of countries to learn how business is done around the world. They learn about each country's unique business environment, opportunities for social entrepreneurship, and the role of business people in addressing social challenges.

By Parthi Duraisamy T’16

Image
Parthi grew up in Kochi, India and moved to Singapore after high school. He graduated from National University of Singapore in 2009 with a degree in electrical engineering. Before Tuck, he worked for Barclays Investment Bank in London. He will be heading back to London to work at McKinsey & Company for the summer.

Imagine you are in a quaint, serene village on the top of a hill surrounded by a stunning valley. You are sitting by a long, wooden dining table and are listening to ancient Georgian polyphonic singing. You are surrounded by gorgeous brick walls adorned with antique Georgian artifacts. Then you are served some of the best wines in the world, fermented and aged in qvevris (clay vessels lined with beeswax and buried in the earth). To add to the splendor, you are served a delicious, ten-course Georgian meal.

This was just one of the many amazing moments we had during our spring break GIX (Global Insight Expedition) to Georgia and Armenia. Observing and experiencing how food and wine are deeply connected to the Caucasus’ culture helped us understand the region on a personal level. We learned the art of toasting during meals. Toasts that helped us learn so much more about ourselves and our peers, and the profundity of which gently teased out a tear or two.

The Georgian leg of the trip was led by Lizzie Napier, associate director in the Career Development Office. Her father was Georgian and her grandfather was a leader of the 1924 Georgian uprising against the communists. She is extremely well connected in Georgia and this helped her curate an itinerary that finely balanced our cultural, political, and business exposures. Be it having a cigar with a Tuck alum Image
who is a majority investor in several of the largest companies in Georgia (Irakli Rukhadze T'92), or having tea with the CEO of the largest tea company in Georgia (Mikheil Chkuaseli), or toasting with the man who founded one of the largest banks in Georgia (Mamuka Khazaradze), we were humbled to meet so many of these highly successful leaders. What surprised me most was how honest, direct, and genuinely interested they were in talking to us.

The Armenian leg of the trip was led by Steve Powell, professor of business administration, and Nick Bazarian T’15. They both have ancestral roots in Armenia and experiencing the country together with them was incredible. One of the highlights was meeting with the chief of staff to the president of Armenia, Vigen Sargsyan, who gave us an overview of the history and politics of Armenia. We also sat together for a case discussion with MBA students of the American University of Armenia (AUA). We were pleasantly surprised with the hospitality of the AUA students who took us out every night and also bid us farewell when we left Armenia. Just when we thought the trip couldn’t get any better, it did—we travelled back to Georgia in a soviet-era Russian train. The snail’s pace of the train didn’t stop us from celebrating the end of our magnificent trip all night long.

I experienced so much singing, so much dancing, and so much camaraderie during my time in Georgia and Armenia. I learned not just about business, but also about life, from the wonderful people of the Caucasus. I have been fortunate to travel to more than 40 countries, but this trip has been one of the best, if not the best!

Hear from other Tuckies on their Global Insight Expeditions: India, Israel, South Africa, Japan, and the Netherlands.

Image

Above: Tuckies pictured with Mikheil Chkuaseli, CEO at Geoplant Ltd, former minister of finance of Georgia, and governor of Guria Region, Georgia; Tamara Kirvalidze, director for external relations media communications at TBC Bank; and Mamuka Khazaradze, chairman at TBC Bank. Photo taken at Chateau Mukhrani by Nick Bazarian T'15.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 26 Jan 2015
Posts: 27
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, General Management
GMAT 1: 660 Q44 V36
GMAT 2: 620 Q42 V36
GPA: 3
WE: Project Management (Consumer Products)
Reviews Badge
Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 May 2015, 08:05
Any R3 or waitlisted applicants with good news?
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 30 May 2014
Posts: 2
Concentration: Finance, Real Estate
Schools: Tuck '17 (A)
GMAT 1: 750 Q48 V44
GPA: 3.79
WE: Analyst (Real Estate)
Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 May 2015, 08:19
No news here, yet. Hoping for the phone call. I'm surprised that no one's heard anything...or at least they're not reporting.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!   [#permalink] 15 May 2015, 08:19

Go to page   Previous    1  ...  55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66    Next  [ 1303 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2017 - Calling All Applicants!

  new topic post reply Update application status  

Moderator: BingingOnNetflix






Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne