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Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants!

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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Mar 2016, 01:54
Hi! Congrats to everyone who got the coveted call! :)

I actually wanted to go for a feedback...and Adcom replied that feedback is applicable only for reapplicants!
Any insights on this?
TIA!
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Applying to Tuck? Check These off Your List  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2016, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Applying to Tuck? Check These off Your List
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As you continue working on your April Round application, think about the following reminders. Checking off these tasks—in advance of the April 4 deadline—will help you submit the strongest application possible. Good luck, and we look forward to getting to know you soon!

1. If you are able to visit and take advantage of our open interview policy, book yours soon. The interview deadline for the April application round is April 4. Of course, we understand that circumstances sometimes prevent applicants from a visit to Tuck, and that’s OK!  An interview is not required in order to apply and Tuck does offer interviews by invitation.

2. Check-in on your recommenders to be sure they are on track to submit their recommendation on time. Be sure to do this prior to the application deadline to ensure that they have time to comply with the deadline, or, if necessary, you have time to find a new recommender.

3. Don’t procrastinate on tackling the essays! This is often an element of the application that many prospective students leave as the final step in the application process, and many are surprised by how challenging they can be. Remember, the suggested word count for each essay is around 500 words, so a great deal of introspection is often needed to ensure that you present the most clear, concise and well-presented essays you can.

4. Proofread. Proofread. Proofread. We can’t say this enough. You may be surprised to know how often we see mistakes that are so easy to avoid with a little attention to detail (remember, Spellcheck is not foolproof, nor is “find and replace”). Focus on good grammar and clear, focused writing.

5. Strive to submit your application prior to the April 4 deadline. Not only will this allow you to troubleshoot if the unexpected happens, it also ensures that you don’t have to experience the last-minute rush of getting everything in on time.

6. Be sure to submit your official GMAT score. The turnaround time for official GMAT scores is down to just 5 or 6 days, so you have some additional leeway in terms of how close to the January deadline you take the test and still have time to get it submitted.

7. Continue to be introspective and explore programs you think would be a good fit. We invite you to take advantage of the many tools, resources and opportunities available to you.
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2016, 04:19
I got denied w/o interview, but in my rejection note, they requested me to seek feedback, starting that my profile had a lot of potential, and have encouraged me to reapply.

If they felt I had potential, any idea why I wasn't given an interview? I'm guessing its because I probably come from an overrepresented candidate pool (Indian + Engineer + Consulting)
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2016, 07:38
Hi Everyone, Tuck chat will start in 20 minutes. If you are around, join the chat room to attend this Q&A with Tuck admission director. http://gmatclub.com/gchat/

Narenn wrote:
Live Chat Session with Tuck Admission Director


Good luck to all January round applicants who are waiting for the decisions!! This is to inform all applicants that the last chat session of this application season with Tuck school will be held on March 17th. All current as well as prospective applicants are requested to attend this chat and get answers to your questions from Tuck's admission director.

Date: March 17, 2016.
Time: 9 AM Pacific Time

Place: GMAT Club Chat Room http://gmatclub.com/gchat/


Presenter: Kristin Roth, Associate Director of Admissions at Tuck.


Kristin is an Associate Director of Admissions at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth and has been with Tuck since 2007. She serves on the admissions committee, reads applications, interviews candidates, leads recruitment of military veterans, and travels globally for Tuck. Prior to Tuck, Kristin worked in career services at Dartmouth College, the University of Virginia, and Georgetown University, as well as in human resources for General Electric. She received her undergraduate degree from Georgetown University and master’s degrees from Georgetown and the University of Virginia.

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CDO Weighs In: Recruiting Advice for Investment Banking - Part II  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2016, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: CDO Weighs In: Recruiting Advice for Investment Banking - Part II
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Deirdre O’Donnell is an associate director of the Career Development Office (CDO).

Click here for Part I of this series.

For the investment banking industry, how important is prior experience vs. performance in interview vs. networking?

The job is going to go to the person who’s competent, can do the work, and wants it the most. How do they measure how badly you want it? Part of it is networking; part of it is having really meaningful conversations with multiple people at each institution. They definitely track which events you’ve been to so you want to be at all events. It’s a huge commitment of time. Most students will go down to New York to visit banks at least once so if you’re interviewing with eight banks, that’s a lot of trips to New York. (However, it is always important to remember that the quality of your interactions outweigh the quantity.)

There are a lot of people interviewing for a very small number of jobs so your initiative and passion really play a role. The ones who want it the most are the ones who are going to get it. If a particular bank is your number-one choice, tell them that in an interview because making that commitment in the interview may make the difference between you and somebody else getting the offer. (Obviously, integrity is everything and you can only tell one bank they are your top choice.)

For bulge bracket banks, prior experience is not critical. If you can get through the Tuck curriculum and perform well, they will be confident that you can do the job. The big investment banks have very robust training where they will teach you everything you need to know based upon your level of understanding once you get in there. Middle market investment banks also have training but their associate classes are smaller. It is different when you go to the boutique investment banks. Some have training programs which are usually small, and ideally they’re looking for somebody who already has a grasp of finance, preferably with previous investment banking experience. Boutique banks will often look at somebody who’s been at a bulge bracket bank for two years and hire them laterally.

Any other advice on how best to prepare for interviews in the investment banking industry?

There are a finite number of requirements to do well in an interview and we’ve recorded most of them. Trust what the previous Tuck students have put together in terms of questions asked and practice! Practice your technical questions—you have to do well on them to get to the final round—and practice doing fit interviews so you’re thoughtful around your core competencies. Show your commitment and passion for the business, network, and reach out to second-years and young Tuck alumni.

Finally, have a clear understanding of who the Tuck recruiting team is at each bank. You only have so much time at each bank, so you need to target the right people to spend time with.
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Is getting an MBA right for you?  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2016, 05:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Is getting an MBA right for you?
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Is getting an MBA right for you? This USA Today article was published in November, but it’s just as relevant today. If you’re starting to gear up in order to submit MBA applications this fall, you’re off to a good start. The strongest applications come from candidates who have taken the time to figure out what they really want from a program and have done a significant amount of research to help inform their goals and school choices. In fact, a lot of the feedback we’ve been providing to those currently on the waitlist asks them to clarify their goals, and strengthen them with details.

We have many more qualified applicants than we do seats in the class. It would be unwise for an admissions committee to fill those seats with people who don’t understand what an MBA is, why they need one, and why now is the right time for them to pursue it. Once you’ve determined this, make sure you’re able to articulate it with clarity and detail, both on paper and verbally. One of the biggest application mistakes we see is not addressing the “why” or the “how” of a given question.

By understanding why you need an MBA, you’ll not only be a stronger applicant, but you’ll also be better prepared to take advantage of the MBA program itself. This article is a good place to start framing your introspection.  
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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A Summer Internship at Converse  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2016, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: A Summer Internship at Converse
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By Matthew Wheeler T'16


Sneakers everywhere, I remember thinking, when I walked into Converse Headquarters last winter to interview for a summer internship position. The sneakers, rock-and-roll music, and street art throughout the office were a jarring departure from the more traditional, corporate environment I worked in prior to Tuck. Immediately, I started to feel a sense of excitement and energy; Converse’s core values of creativity and individuality were personified in this space. 

Before coming to Tuck, I worked as a strategy consultant, where I particularly liked grappling with issues surrounding customer experience. For my summer internship I knew I wanted three key things: to work at a company obsessed with customer experience, to put the general management perspectives I learned in my first year at Tuck to use in an interdisciplinary role, and to work with people who would challenge me and give me an opportunity to grow. My summer with Converse, as an intern in the Strategic Planning group, satisfied all three of these desires beyond expectations.

Over the course of my summer, I worked on three primary projects; each provided me with different opportunities and learnings. 

My first project was to help senior leaders develop and create a set of materials which chronicled Converse’s past performance and explicated growth paths and expectations for the future. What were the key areas for growth? How were we positioned? How would we communicate this? This work had me interacting with c-level executives and decision makers across Converse within my first week at the firm. Not only was this a rewarding task, but it provided me with great foundation, overview, and relationships to begin my summer.

The next project was to think about Converse’s commercial strategy and better understand channel dynamics across products and geographies. This work allowed me to interact with front-line general managers in regions and categories. Exposure to these different colleagues enriched my experience and perspective. Throughout this project I became better able to see through the lens of strategy activation; good ideas are only as valuable as your ability to share them and build support for execution.

My last project during the summer involved kicking-off a new study, evaluating potential new product offerings Converse could bring to market in the near-, medium-, and long-term. This project exposed me to more the creative and artistic side of the business. Collaborating with product designers and engineers really made the material come to life in a new way. The ability to think through the whole lifecycle of new product development: from concept, to design, to business plan, to timeline, to execution was exciting to be a part of. 

Throughout my ten weeks at Converse, I had many rewarding personal and professional experiences. The people I was able to work with every day were uniformly talented, passionate, and helpful. Working with two Tuck alums (T’05 & T’11) was particularly exciting. I was grateful to be in a company allowed me to take risks, explore, and put to work the concepts I learned during my first year at Tuck. 

I left the summer with a greater appreciation for the significant impact internal strategy teams can have, a perspective into the life of a general manager, a range of experiences that I can draw on in the future, a host of new friends … and far too many pairs of new sneakers.   

Matt Wheeler is a second-year student at Tuck. Prior to Tuck, he was a senior associate consultant at L.E.K Consulting. He has a degree in economics from Boston College.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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CDO Weighs In: Recruiting Advice for the Consulting Industry  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2016, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: CDO Weighs In: Recruiting Advice for the Consulting Industry
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Stephen Pidgeon T’07 is an associate director of the Career Development Office (CDO) and author of the books How to Get a Job in Consulting and Case Interviews for Beginners.

How should someone prepare for fit interviews for the consulting industry?

The most important thing is to understand what competencies the companies are looking for. It sounds obvious, but you can’t really succeed in a job interview unless you know what they’re looking for. The good thing about consulting companies is they’re very, very transparent about that. You can go to their website and there’s usually a page entitled, “What We’re Looking For.” The other nice thing is that they’re all really looking for the same type of person, so you only need to do this research once. They want to know: Are you intellectually curious? Are you very driven to succeed? Are you able to work well with other people in stressful situations?

Once you understand what they’re actually looking for, then it’s a matter of thinking very carefully about your own experience. All consulting companies that I know of use the competency-based interviewing model. Rather than asking you about your theories, they’re asking you for evidence from the past with questions like, “Tell me about a time when you had to influence someone” or “Tell me about a time when you did something you’re very proud of.”

For your answers, imagine that you’re writing a novel or a Hollywood screenplay and use the same techniques that those writers use. Come up with memorable details. If you tell me, “My supervisor called me into his office,” that’s one thing. If you tell me, “My supervisor was a scary person, very intimidating, and his office was on the top floor of a tower in New York and it was all glass and minimalist furniture,” that tells me a lot more about him and it actually allows the listener to remember it and share the emotion that you felt.

Also, tell me the ups and downs in the story. Very often, when people tell a story from their past and they know it turned out well, they make it sound easy. I want you to put me back in your shoes at that point when you really thought, “I don’t know how I’m going to do this” or “This is going to fail.” If you give me that sense of threat and peril at the beginning, I’ll feel more empathy with you as we go through the story.

To recap: know the job, know your stories, and use storytelling tricks to make the person understand, follow, and remember you. That last one is important. For example, today, we’ve got McKinsey on campus. Every McKinsey interviewer is going to interview 8 people. At the end of a very long day, they sit down in a meeting room and decide who to hire. Your story has got to stay in that person’s memory if you want to get hired, so you want to be the one who’s created the vivid images and impression.

Shed some light on technical questions that are asked in the consulting industry.

The consulting industry uses the case interview extensively, which, simply put, means you will need to talk through a hypothetical business problem with some actual data to show you can use math. It’ll test a number of things, like your ability to come up with a structured approach. Let’s say they ask you how to improve the profitability of Murphy’s on the Green in Hanover. Even if you’ve never stopped to think about running a bar before, hopefully you could take a minute and think, “Okay, here are the kinds of things I want to talk about: the customers, the operations, the staff, etc.” Then, they’ll give you some data so you can show that you can derive insight from it. They’ll also often have some sort of creative-thinking component that will really push you out of the box, too.

The other area, across both the fit and technical questions, is the real question they are asking themselves: “Do I want to work with this person?” So even if you’ve got the great story about influencing your boss and you do really well in the case interview, if you’re not the kind of people person they want on their team or in front of their client, they’re not going to hire you. Whereas on the reverse, if you actually are friendly and they feel that you would do well with their teams and their clients, you can probably make some mistakes along the way and still have a better chance of being hired.

So that’s actually the secret a lot of students instinctively know, but spend so long practicing the technical stuff that they forget—to be themselves.
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Why This Marine Chose Tuck  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2016, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Why This Marine Chose Tuck
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By David Donahue T'17

 

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Going to business school was not even on my radar while I was in the Marines.  I didn’t know its purpose or who it was intended for. I grew up in a small town west of Boston and attended Bowdoin College in Maine. I studied Government, Legal Studies, and English and spent my summers at a residential fencing company, installing wooden fences. When not digging holes, I attended Officer Candidate School for the US Marine Corps in Quantico. An acquaintance of mine from Bowdoin had participated in the program and said it was one of the “best” experiences of his life. I always believed in the idea of service and thought this would be an awesome and challenging leadership experience.

After graduation and a short stint in construction management, I went back to the Marines. I spent about a year in schools of different sorts, ultimately ending up as an infantry platoon commander in Camp Pendleton. In my first deployment to Afghanistan, I was responsible for 50 Marines, 40 Afghan National Army soldiers, and about 60 square kilometers of local villages. I did a subsequent deployment as a platoon commander in support of the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit throughout Southeast Asia and the Middle East.  After returning, I spent three years teaching at The Basic School and the Infantry Officer Course. 

While I was at the Infantry Officer Course, one of my co-workers was applying to business school. I picked his brain for a while and determined that business school might be a good way for me to transition out of the Marines, learn some new skills, and apply my leadership skills in a different manner. I had no idea of what type of industry or company I would want to work for. Business school would expose me to industries and companies in the short term as well as give me some long-term flexibility by developing the hard skills needed to be successful later on.

Additionally, I was fortunate enough to lead the design and implementation of exercises that tested current and future Marine Corps equipment for potential future operating environments. The problem-solving involved with the exercises and knowing that the work I was doing was going to have an impact on the future of the Marine Corps helped shape my decision to go to business school. I truly enjoyed the problem-solving, working with other motivated people, and knowing that this work was going to help positively impact the lives of Marines. About a year later and after way too many hours doing GMAT math, I applied to and was ultimately accepted by Tuck.

Tuck was the best fit for me for a number of reasons. The small class size enables me to build a strong relationship with my classmates and professors. The close-knit community was a great place for our family. My wife was able to get a job in the Tuck Alumni Giving office and my daughter was fortunate enough to get a spot at the Dartmouth daycare facility. Additionally, living in Sachem Village (Tuck’s graduate student housing) has enabled my wife and me to build strong relationships with other couples at Tuck. The strong alumni network facilitated my learning more about Tuck during my school search process and also in getting a job once at school. The Tuck Tripod League (intramural hockey) was a way for me to stay active during the week while building strong relationships with the rest of my class, the second years, and other members of the Tuck community.

Post Tuck, my goal is to be a strategy consultant at a large international firm. I recently accepted a summer internship offer with Deloitte Consulting in their Strategy & Operations sector in Boston, MA, which I am extremely excited about. Tuck helped me to secure the internship by facilitating on-campus information sessions with Deloitte as well as coordinating a “Consulting Trek” down to Boston to visit the Deloitte office. Tuck also does a great job of putting you in contact with Tuck alumni at whichever company you are interested. One of the most special things about Tuck is just how strong the alumni network is. I was able to learn a ton about Deloitte’s Boston office through the Tuckies and military veterans who work there which absolutely helped shape my decision to apply to the office.

Many of the top business schools offer military applicants the opportunity to visit and learn more about their programs through special programs. Be sure to check with the programs you’re most interested in to see what they offer. Tuck is hosting its Military Visit Day on Monday, April 18, 2016. Join us that day to learn more about Tuck!

David's back on Tuck 360, this Thursday, with tips for business school applicants from military backgrounds. Make sure to check it out! 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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What We Learned: The 2016 India GIX  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Mar 2016, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: What We Learned: The 2016 India GIX
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Traveling to India with nine other Tuckies this past spring break was truly an eye-opening experience.

The focus of our expedition was reverse innovation and design thinking. Tuck partnered with the Indian School of Business (ISB) for a six-day trip from Hyderabad to Mumbai, utilizing several in-class sessions Image
and numerous site visits to highlight the Global Insight Expeditions (GIX) curriculum. Aside from experiencing the culture and people of India, our focus was to identify non-consumers, and address an unmet need using empathetic design thinking.

The faculty members of ISB gave us a phenomenal introduction to marketing in India—in particular, ISB provided a basic understanding of the marketing similarities and differences in India compared to marketing in developed nations. In the classroom we learned—through facts and figures—how vast India is culturally, economically, and regionally. At each company visit and with each conversation, we experienced these concepts firsthand.

Throughout the six-day journey, our activities included:

  • Infosys company presentation and tour
  • Interviews of college students, professionals, and homemakers facilitated by market research companies
  • Company presentation and tour with CEO of LV Prasad, India’s leader in affordable eye hospital centers
  • Visit of rural Hyderabad including house visits of weaving community
  • Tour of car manufacturing plant Mahindra Mahindra in Mumbai
  • Tour of Dharavi slums in Mumbai
  • Company discussion with the Future Group, leading retailer in India
  • Shadowing of lunch delivery service Dabbawala
  • Networking happy hour with successful female entrepreneurs in India
  • ITC Choupal company presentation
  • Sit down chat with the owner of first microbrewery in Mumbai

Each activity and conversation provided a new perspective and lens to view India. For instance, learning how LV Prasad was able to increase cornea donations by three-fold through positioning representatives at key hospitals, as well as how ITC Choupal transformed rural agriculture through it’s understanding of the market and its customers. By talking to entrepreneurs as well as various individuals along the socioeconomic spectrum, we learned varying unmet needs ranging from the desire for more greenery in Hyderabad by a business professional, to the need for computer access by an aspiring college computer engineer.

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The India GIX was a truly memorable experience—bringing me closer to my classmates and providing me a new way to view the opportunities and needs of the largest democracy in the world.

Chris is a first-year student at Tuck who was born and raised in California. After completing his master's of engineering from the University of California San Diego, he participated in Baxter’s Operations Development Program. He has four years of pharmaceutical operations experience and will be working at in operations consulting during the summer.

 

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Military Visit Day (Sneak Peak): Tips for Applicants  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2016, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Military Visit Day (Sneak Peak): Tips for Applicants
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By David Donahue T'17

 

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On Tuesday, I shared my personal path to the Marines and then to Tuck. Today, looking back at the application process, there are a few tips I would give to business school applicants with military backgrounds (a small dose of the kind of things you'll learn at Military Visit Day, April 18!). 

 

Tip # 1: Start learning to talk about yourself. The school absolutely cares about your leadership skills and your potential added-value to the school but they care about the personal impact that you had. How specifically did you train 100 Marines to get ready for a deployment? What sets you apart from other applicants? It’s okay to replace the “we” with an “I” here or there in an effort to really explain your impact. 

Tip # 2: Determine the learning environment in which you would be the most successful. Do you excel in large or small classes? Do you like the lecture or case method? Do you like working in groups or individually? Do you want to pick all of your own classes or do you want to be part of a more general curriculum? Understanding the environment in which you would be most successful is crucial to narrowing down the schools that appeal the most to you. 

Tip # 3: What’s your story? Why did you join the military? Why do you want to go to business school? What do you want to do after business school? Schools put a lot of emphasis on these parts, both with the essays and with the interviews. Spend the time thinking about these questions and make sure you can explicitly answer each of them (and be convincing).

Many of the top business schools offer military applicants the opportunity to visit and learn more about their programs through special programs. Tuck is hosting a special day for military applicants, Monday, April 18. Tuck’s Admissions Office and the Armed Forces Alumni Association (AFAA) teamed up to plan a day full of events that will help set you up for success in the MBA application process. There will be a chance to sit in on a class and panels hosted by members of the Admissions Committee, current Military students, the Career Development Office, and the Financial Aid Office.

If you are planning to apply to the Tuck Class of 2019, you may schedule an admissions interview during Military Visit Day (if you’re ready!). Join the AFAA members on Sunday night for an informal social. Military Visit Day officially kicks off at 7:30am, Monday morning, April 18.

Join us to learn more about Tuck!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Military Visit Day (Sneak Peek): Tips for Applicants  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2016, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Military Visit Day (Sneak Peek): Tips for Applicants
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By David Donahue T'17

 

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On Tuesday, I shared my personal path to the Marines and then to Tuck. Today, looking back at the application process, there are a few tips I would give to business school applicants with military backgrounds (a small dose of the kind of things you'll learn at Military Visit Day, April 18!). 

 

Tip # 1: Start learning to talk about yourself. The school absolutely cares about your leadership skills and your potential added-value to the school but they care about the personal impact that you had. How specifically did you train 100 Marines to get ready for a deployment? What sets you apart from other applicants? It’s okay to replace the “we” with an “I” here or there in an effort to really explain your impact. 

Tip # 2: Determine the learning environment in which you would be the most successful. Do you excel in large or small classes? Do you like the lecture or case method? Do you like working in groups or individually? Do you want to pick all of your own classes or do you want to be part of a more general curriculum? Understanding the environment in which you would be most successful is crucial to narrowing down the schools that appeal the most to you. 

Tip # 3: What’s your story? Why did you join the military? Why do you want to go to business school? What do you want to do after business school? Schools put a lot of emphasis on these parts, both with the essays and with the interviews. Spend the time thinking about these questions and make sure you can explicitly answer each of them (and be convincing).

Many of the top business schools offer military applicants the opportunity to visit and learn more about their programs through special programs. Tuck is hosting a special day for military applicants, Monday, April 18. Tuck’s Admissions Office and the Armed Forces Alumni Association (AFAA) teamed up to plan a day full of events that will help set you up for success in the MBA application process. There will be a chance to sit in on a class and panels hosted by members of the Admissions Committee, current Military students, the Career Development Office, and the Financial Aid Office.

If you are planning to apply to the Tuck Class of 2019, you may schedule an admissions interview during Military Visit Day (if you’re ready!). Join the AFAA members on Sunday night for an informal social. Military Visit Day officially kicks off at 7:30am, Monday morning, April 18.

Join us to learn more about Tuck!
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Get to Know a Tuckie: Ashley Cousins T’17  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2016, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Get to Know a Tuckie: Ashley Cousins T’17
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Ashley Cousins T’17 is from Charlottesville, Virginia. She attended Spelman College in Atlanta Georgia where she studied economics. Prior to Tuck, she worked for Google and then Delta, where she was focused on international partnerships. This summer she is interning at Esteé Lauder.

Did you know during your undergrad that you were going to get your MBA?

Not initially. I’m a first generation college student, so I couldn’t really imagine myself here 10 years ago. But I knew I wanted an undergraduate degree. I think toward my junior or senior year I started thinking about getting an MBA, but I wanted to get more work experience before I started applying to schools. I really wanted to figure out what I wanted to do before business school so I could maximize my time and focus as opposed to trying to figure out what I wanted to do while in business school.

I worked for about four and a half years before I went to business school. I worked at Google for two and a half years in the sales organization for large organizations. It was great to be in the tech space, but I knew I was going to pursue an MBA and I wanted to round out my perspective before going to business school. I wanted to work in emerging markets, so I transitioned to Delta where I worked in international partnerships. My job was to increase the loyalty database in Brazil and the Caribbean by strategically positioning Delta’s brand and managing partnerships in those regions.

Why Tuck?

I want to go into beauty which is a very non-traditional path for business school. The options were very, very thin. You always hear about how great Tuck alumni are, so I wanted to test this out. I reached out to alumni at all the schools I was accepted to, and I was really impressed by Tuck. I talked to an alumnus at Esteé Lauder and although he worked in a completely different field from marketing, he was more than willing to assist me in learning about the culture of Esteé Lauder and if it was a great fit for me. He took me to lunch, showed me store fronts, and competitor’s store fronts. It was extremely fascinating. Not many people go above and beyond in a situation where they have nothing to gain from it. He didn’t really have to do what he did. ImageTuck alumni did way more than I expected, so that really sealed the deal for me.

So, how is it going at Tuck so far?

It’s been really crazy—it was a major adjustment. I should write a blog post just on transitioning from the South to the Northeast. I didn’t even own a winter coat. Here, everyone was telling me to get Bean boots. I was like, “What are Bean boots??” I came from 90 degree weather, and when I got here it was 70 degrees which is basically fall for me, but it was still summer. It took a while to adjust to the New England lifestyle. I went apple picking for the first time. I went skiing for the first time. Overall it’s been great but also tough.

If you’ve made it to a place like Tuck, you’re probably really hard on yourself. So being in situations where you’re constantly challenging yourself can be immensely draining at times because you want to be great. You want to be great at everything. At some point, at the end of Fall B, I realized that I can’t be great at everything. It’s impossible. What I can do is stretch myself to learn as much as I possibly can to leave Tuck better than I came in. That’s the transition that you make in Fall B. It’s about learning that you try your best, but it’s impossible to be great at everything. The people who learn this faster tend to have an easier transition, but it is hard and people handle it differently.

You have a lot going on. How do you manage your time?

I am the academic rep for the T’17s, which is interesting because I take my academics seriously, but I also understand that I can’t kill myself to get the best grades. So I like to find a balance and be involved socially as well and get to know more of my classmates. Every time I go out, I feel like I get to know people better and that feels great. I’ve learned that you just have to go out and force yourself to be social. I try to be in some-what of a leadership position on campus, I want to hang out with my classmates, and I try to do well in academics. I don’t try to be the best at any one thing—I try to be good enough in each to where I’m satisfied with myself. Sometimes this is harder than other times since I’m tough on myself. When I first got to Tuck I thought I was the only one who was having a tough time transitioning, then one day you talk with your classmates and you realize that most are having a tough time transitioning and balancing it all. It’s almost like a bond is formed over the toughness of how everything works—it’s really what makes us all closer.  

I think the number one thing is admitting when you need help. You’d be amazed at how many people are willing to help you when you need it. There are times when I can’t get my head around certain things, and then I study with my study group mates. I’ve been on the phone until 2 a.m. with a friend, working on problems in a class that he wasn’t even in. I had told him I was struggling and he helped me. And in turn, the classes that I’m strong in, I help out others. I think, because we’re not competitive at Tuck, we’re even more willing to help each other.  

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Lastly, it’s really important for you to take time for yourself—even if it’s only five or ten minutes—and sit and do nothing to process your own thoughts. It’s not a long time, but it’s definitely needed. There are times where I pencil in things on my calendar where it’s just for “me time.”

Do you have a favorite moment since being here at Tuck?

 As the academic rep, I had to plan section wars which is a big to-do on campus. I was first impressed by how many of my classmates volunteered their time to help plan something that we honestly really didn’t understand what it was. We were all figuring out what it was as we were doing it. At one point I was so overwhelmed and I didn’t know how to say I was overwhelmed. One of my classmates saw me one day, and he saw just saw it in my eyes. He stopped and took the time to say, “I can see you’re overwhelmed and need help, what do you need to do today?” So I gave him a list of what I had to do regarding the party that night, and he took over almost 70 percent of it and just did it! He absolutely didn’t have to do that, but he did. I also realized from this that Tuck is so small that you can’t hide. People are always going to notice when you need help and say hey, I’m here for you. For me that was one moment that was really great. It’s easy to ask how someone is doing, but it takes a special person to fill in the gaps of somebody else’s needs. 
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Top 3 Reasons for Choosing Tuck: Military Edition  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2016, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Top 3 Reasons for Choosing Tuck: Military Edition
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We asked a couple members of our Armed Forces Alumni Association (AFAA) what their top 3 reasons for choosing Tuck were. Here's what they had to say...

Sam F. Courtney, T’17

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Sam grew up in Auburn, WA and is a 2010 graduate of Stanford University with a BA in Public Policy Honors. Following graduation, he worked at the Federal Reserve Board of Governors in Washington, D.C. before being commissioned into the Marine Corps. Sam was stationed primarily in the Asia Pacific region and held multiple intelligence positions at both the tactical and operational levels, including deployments with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit and a Special Operations Command Pacific Augmentation Team in Indonesia. His primary focus is currently in investment banking.

The community: A class size of less than 300 students ensures that you will form lasting relationships with nearly all of your classmates prior to graduation. Professors have vested interests in their students as Tuck is focused primarily on the MBA experience.

The core curriculum: Coming to Tuck as a Marine, my exposure to many areas of business management was limited. The core curriculum requirement forced me to take courses outside of my initial interests, and in the process has greatly increased my holistic knowledge of how businesses operate.

The location: The remote location of Hanover creates an environment where interactions with your peers is constant. I wanted to join a program where I could spend time with classmates in both classroom and social settings. Skiing and hockey are also benefits of the Upper Valley.

Max Wunderlich, T’16

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Max graduated from the US Military Academy in 2008 with a B.S. in International History and Arabic and was commissioned as an Armor officer. He served as a Scout Platoon Leader, Troop Executive Officer, Troop Commander, and Squadron Assistant Operations Officer in the 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, KS and deployed to Kandahar Province, Afghanistan in 2011. He then served as an Observer/Controller Team Chief with 1st Army at Camp Shelby, MS before coming to Tuck. Max and his wife Jamie have two extremely energetic sons, Kurt and Thomas. He plans to find an operations or marketing role in the Upper Valley after graduation.

Loyalty: One of the first things I noticed, apart from reading the reviews of the close-knit community, etc., was the extreme loyalty of the alumni to the program. This was manifested by the giving rate of 70%+, but also by the stories of alums being very responsive to current students, as well as each other. I figured that people vote with their wallets—for that many people to contribute, there must be something quite special about the school. Regarding the latter, I can personally attest to the fact that alums will do everything in their power to help you; as soon as they see that Tuck email address, you’re family.

Passion: Every time I talked to a Tuckie, current student or alum from 20+ years ago, there was this palpable zeal that seemed to ooze through the phone. They were so excited to talk about the school and its people; and the theme I kept hearing over and over again was how jealous they were of the incoming students; nobody wanted their 2 years at Tuck to end. It’s not that people from other schools were disparaging about their schools, but it just wasn’t the same. The only way I can describe this Tuck passion is “cult-like” but in a good way…

Fit/Location: When I came to interview at Tuck, it was an excellent opportunity to experience the community first hand. You simply can’t replicate the utility of this, to me it’s the most important part of the school selection process. It just felt right, the best fit for me. Plus the location was ideal for my family: my wife and I aren’t big city people, so the idea of rural New England living was very appealing (so much so in fact we’re continuing to do it after graduation!).

Interested in learning more about business school, the MBA application process, or transitioning from the military to a career in business? Tuck Admissions and the AFAA teamed up to plan a special event for future military applicants on Monday, April 18. There will be a chance to sit in on a class, as well as attend panels hosted by members of the Admissions Committee, current military students, the Career Development Office, and the Financial Aid Office. Register to join us for Military Visit Day today!
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Brazilience: What We Learned on the 2016 Brazil GIX  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2016, 13:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Brazilience: What We Learned on the 2016 Brazil GIX
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By Sherry Sun T’17 & Emily Niehaus T’17

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Sherry grew up in China and lived in Finland for a few years before she came to the U.S. She graduated from Boston University Questrom School of Business in 2011 with a major in Business Administration and Management. Before Tuck, she worked for Boston Scientific as a project manager. 

During spring break, I traveled to Brazil with 21 fellow Tuckies on a trip led by Professor Leslie Robinson, an associate professor who teaches financial accounting in the MBA program. This trip was one of the Global Insight Expeditions (GIX) trips offered at Tuck that earns you course credit and counts toward the global requirement as part of the Tuck curriculum.

The course was focused on “Brazilience”—building resilience amid economic stress and change in Brazil. We had an opportunity to visit various leading Brazilian companies such as Engie, Radar SA, Embraer, Kroton Educational, and Iochpe-Maxion. These visits have further advanced my understanding of the business environments in different industries, and the policies and structures that the Brazilian government put in place to build a resilient economy.

Fabio Giambiagi, a famous Brazilian economist, delivered a speech on the overview of the Brazilian economy. From his speech, I learned that the success of the economic reform and the start of the social reform so far has been attributed to Brazil’s decision to cut government spending, float the exchange rate, and raise interest rates to control inflation. However, these policies, along with the current political chaos, have led to an economic contraction with a negative GDP in Brazil. During the time we were in Rio and Sao Paulo, we witnessed the biggest demonstration against the Brazilian government in the history. Given the current political uncertainty in Brazil, I am interested to keep an eye on how the government’s policies will shape the Brazilian economy in the long term.

Apart from company visits and presentations on Brazil’s macroeconomics, I was constantly amazed by the astonishing scenery and fun that the Brazilian culture has to offer. We visited Christ the Redeemer, watched the most beautiful sunset over the Copacabana beach in Rio, learned to Samba dance for the first time in a local club, had a Tuck ladies’ night enjoying the night view of Sao Paulo on the rooftop sky bar, and, of course, tried various exotic food and Caipirinha. The GIX experience was such an eye-opening experience for me. It allowed me to gain a deep understanding of Brazil’s political landscape and business environments. And most importantly, it was an amazing spring trip to bond with Tuckies.

***

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Emily grew up in Greenwich, Conn. She graduated from Dartmouth College in 2012 majoring in psychology and geography. She spent the last three years working at Parthenon-EY in Boston, Mass., specializing in health care and private equity management consulting. 

I had an unbelievable time traveling to Brazil on the Tuck GIX with 20 of my classmates and Professor Leslie Robinson. We couldn’t have asked for a better time to go to enhance our learning of the country because: 1. Brazil is in its largest economic downturn since the 1930s; 2. It’s in the process of impeaching its president, which led to millions of people taking to the streets in protest; and 3. Brazil is hosting the Olympics in Rio this coming summer.

It is my belief that you can really understand the true business environment when a country is in a downturn, and that is what our trip theme Brazilience was all about: How is Brazil showing resilience as a country, community, and a collection of businesses through this economic and political turmoil?

We had the opportunity to visit a wide variety of companies both in both Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. We visited an aircraft manufacturer, a foundation providing assistance to kids in a very poor neighborhood, a city operations center, the American consulate, a government agency bringing in foreign investment, a startup incubator, and more. My favorite visits were to the Brazilian arm of Engie, an energy company that distributes power to 6 percent of Brazil, and Iochpe-Maxion, the largest wheel manufacturer in the world, because we got extensive time with both CEOs (Iochpe-Maxion’s CEO is a Tuck alum and Engie’s CEO is the father of a current Tuck student). During both visits, we learned all about their company’s strategy, applied our knowledge from our Tuck core classes to their company (accounting, corporate finance, GEM, etc.), and really learned what it is like to run a company in an economic recession and complete political turmoil.

One of my takeaways from the trip is that Brazil is a beautiful country, with a rich culture (we experienced it Samba dancing one night!) that will make it through the mess it is in now. It will be able to broadcast the beauty of its beaches, tropical rainforests, and mountains in Rio this summer with the Olympics. It was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be in Brazil when millions of people took to the streets in protest. Even though I had no idea what everyone was shouting in Portuguese, I could tell that the Brazilian people were ready for change. All the executives at the companies we visited felt the same way. Our Tuck GIX gave us such an insider view into the richness and complexity of Brazil. I will certainly be paying attention to the news as Brazil digs itself out of this mess!

Thank you to the TuckGO office and Professor Robinson for putting together such an incredible trip!

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CDO Weighs In: Recruiting Advice for the Tech Industry  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2016, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: CDO Weighs In: Recruiting Advice for the Tech Industry
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Mathias Machado T’09 is an associate director of Tuck'sCareer Development Office.

Discuss how you’d prepare for fit interviews for the tech industry.

One of the things about tech to keep in mind is that it’s not the same as consulting or investment banking where it’s about one role. Tech companies are so different—not just culturally, but also from a role perspective—and tech has so many niches.

The questions you can expect really depend on the role, but in general you should remember that each company will be looking for different things and it’s important to figure that out. For example, Amazon has 14 leadership principles and they make sure when they ask behavioral questions that they look for them in candidates. Google looks for four attributes in any interview: cognitive ability, leadership or emerging leadership, culture fit (“Googliness”), and role-related knowledge. (That last one is the least important unless it’s for very specific roles.)

The best way to prepare for an interview in tech, besides knowing your story and prepping for the generic behavioral questions, is have an understanding of what’s going on in the industry. You can’t just pick up the newspaper today if you have an interview tomorrow. You really have to look over a period of six months and follow stories. For example, if today Google is acquiring a company, there’s a reason behind it you should know, whether it’s a strategic move to be more competitive in a certain space or to prevent another company from buying it. The only way to know these things is to continuously follow the news.

You can do that however you prefer: listening to podcasts, following Twitter, or reading blogs and publications. Besides knowing the news, you need to also form opinions, which takes time. An interviewer can tell in five minutes whether or not you’re truly passionate and informed about tech.

Shed some light on technical questions that are asked in the tech industry.

It’s difficult to know because it depends on what role you’re interviewing for. If you’re going for a product-related role, they might ask you to tell them your favorite product and why as well as what would you change about it and why. You need to be able to dig deep. I’m just making this example up, but let’s say they ask you to pretend that you’re the product manager for Amazon Prime, which hasn’t been released yet and you have to price it. How much would it be and why? There’s no right answer, but an interviewer will be interested to analyze your thought processes.

Tell me about the logistics of the typical interview process for the tech industry.

Again, there are no “typical” interviews. Amazon, Google, and Microsoft are the three biggest recruiters at Tuck in terms of numbers. Amazon would do first and final rounds in the same week here at Tuck. You would have two interviews with one interviewer each in the first round and two in the second round. For Google, you would have one or two phone interviews then they would fly you out to Mountain View. For some Microsoft roles, like marketing, you would interview here, but for others you would do a phone interview before they fly you out to Seattle.

Most interviews will include a mini case—not as full-fledged as a consulting case—just for reasoning ability. I always tell students to practice consulting cases, even if they’re not going to do consulting because it’s always helpful.

Google used to do brainteasers but now they’re more geared towards reasoning through business problems. One sample case question could be if you were to put a vending machine on an airplane, where it would go, what you would sell, how you would manage inventory, how much you would charge, etc. Your first reaction might be to think about a vending machine selling cans of soda, but if you think differently, you could have earplugs or phone chargers or books. Getting into these kinds of questions tells an interviewer a lot about you and how you think.

For the tech industry, how important is prior experience vs. performance in interview vs. networking?

It depends by company. My experience tells me that for Google, for example, prior experience is important, but it’s less so at Amazon and Microsoft. With Google, if you’ve done marketing before, you’ll probably get a marketing interview, for example. You will be able to move laterally or between functions once you join the company.

Tech is not networking heavy like banking or consulting. It’s always important, however, because it can give you the idea of what makes a marketing role at Microsoft different from one at Amazon. It’s not that companies put emphasis on networking, but it’s important for a student to network to get the right information to then do well in the interview.

Any other advice on how best to prepare for interviews in the tech industry?

Connect with alumni, understand what to expect in an interview, and know the news and the company. Formulate your value position: where do you see yourself fitting in the company and what things would you would like to work on?

The nice thing about the tech industry is that it’s very public. There’s a lot of things written about the tech industry from news to opinion pieces.
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MBA Student, World Traveler, Photographer  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Apr 2016, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: MBA Student, World Traveler, Photographer
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There's a new addition to the walls outside of Tuck's classrooms: the stunning photography of Santhosh Havanagi T'17. From Dartmouth's Baker-Berry Library, to a starry night over Tuck Hall, Santhosh's photography captures the unique beauty of the Tuck School campus and Hanover. 

About Santhosh Havanagi T’17

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The second name sounds Japanese, but Santhosh is actually from Bangalore in India! His family presented him his first DSLR camera as a wedding gift when he married his longtime girlfriend two years ago. Since then, his passion for photography has been fueled by two of his other passions—travel & technology. Prior to Tuck, Santhosh worked in the semiconductor industry in Texas Instruments, where he also worked on an image capture module in a satellite to Mars!

As they say, Photography is the only language that can be understood anywhere in the world. There is no better place than the beautiful Ivy league campus of Tuck & Dartmouth for Santhosh to take his skills to the next level.

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What We Learned: The 2016 Cuba GIX  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Apr 2016, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: What We Learned: The 2016 Cuba GIX
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By Nicole Daniele T'16


My decision to attend the Cuba GIX was motivated by two factors. First, visiting Cuba has always been on my bucket list, so the chance to travel there with one of the first groups from Dartmouth was incredibly compelling. Second, I’d yet to participate in a TuckGO international course, and the opportunity to study in-country with a fantastic professor and alongside a great group of energetic fellow Tuckies made it an easy choice in the last few months of my MBA.

In the weeks before the trip, everyone I spoke with seemed to have an opinion on what I would see, hear, and experience in Cuba. At best, some of them Image
were half true. The trip was, quite honestly, exhausting—in the beginning, we constantly questioned everything, and the bus after each visit was a beehive of conversations. Was that restaurant with the amazing chicken and beans still privately owned, or had it become so profitable and world-renowned that the government stepped in to “help” with operations? Was that artist actually independently and secretly saving historical landmarks, or had the government simply turned a blind eye? I finally realized that not all of my (admittedly incessant) questions would be answered, and that once I learned to go with the Cuban flow, it became so much easier to understand the pace of the island, and to better empathize with the wonderful Cubans we had the opportunity to meet.

Cuba is a place of unexpected contrasts. Pastel-hued buildings—composed in eccentric concoctions of architectural styles—that softly crumble into rubble on the Malecon, are juxtaposed with harsh Soviet-style structures. A favorite restaurant with a stunning rooftop bar is situated at the top of a tenement building, beckoning visitors upstairs with photographs of celebrities next to an enormous wall painted with quotes from Castro’s treatises. A country notoriously dependent on its tobacco exports boasts one of the best longevity rates in the western world. A dual currency system can make transactions between Cubans and tourists difficult. Despite the assumption that socialism Image
perhaps inhibits freedom of speech, music can be heard on every street corner at night in Havana. Much has been written about the desire of American companies to set up operations in Cuba now that relations have resumed between the two countries, but it was clear to all of us on the GIX that none of these business ventures will succeed without commitments from both sides to consider and comprehend the challenges of doing business in Cuba under the current economic model.

As future business leaders, we Tuckies learned a vital lesson in patiently striving to understand the culture, history, and motivations of potential business partners. 

Nicole Daniele is a second-year MBA candidate hailing from New Jersey.  At Tuck she has interviewed prospective candidates as an admissions associate and co-chaired the Women in Business Conference and the Wine Club. After graduation, she is excited to join IGS in Boston, a consulting firm specializing in working with private equity firms.
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Which school should I attend?  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Apr 2016, 05:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Which school should I attend?
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After months (and sometimes years) of getting to know you through your application, your interview, emails, and conversations…we know you’re pretty phenomenal! We also know there are other MBA programs that think so too. And now, with enrollment deadlines right around the corner, you have a flattering—yet difficult—choice to make.

Which school should I attend?  

To start, we’d counter that this is the wrong question. Instead, frame it this way: At which school do I see myself thriving? Where can I make the most of my MBA experience? Which community can I see myself a part of? Who are the people I want as my friends, classmates, teammates, and network?

You’ve been doing this already, but keep talking to current students and alumni. Attend any admit weekends if you’re able. And then…reflect. Can you see yourself at the schools you’re considering? Was the campus and community a place you could live for two years? Are the students and alumni people you could identify with? Are they people you feel compelled to get to know? Did they make you feel comfortable throughout your conversations with them? Was the overall vibe of the school in keeping with your core principles and values? As you ask yourself these questions, many others will come up that will be more specific to you. Don’t underestimate the importance of fit as you consider which school is right for you.

A brief word on the role scholarships might play in your decision. An alum might equate scholarships to a corporate finance principle: don't use short-term funds to invest in long-term capital. Simply put, remove the scholarship (or short-term funds) from the equation entirely. Then, decide which program and which community, can offer you the most value and growth. Where do you see yourself spending the next two years, and who you want to be associated with for a lifetime?

Now, crunch the numbers and consider what they mean. Tuck’s Financial Aid Office encourages all students to review the “Information on Managing Your Money” section of the Mapping Your Future website.

Another valuable resource at Mapping Your Future is the Debt Wizard tool. Here you can determine how much salary is needed to make payments on current and future student loan debt and how much can be borrowed based on expected future earnings.

A post-MBA salary can vary drastically depending on what industry you go into and where you’re located geographically. For example, jobs in the non-profit sector will not pay as much as those in consulting, and a consulting job in India probably won’t pay as much as one in New York. Maybe it does make sense to put a higher premium on scholarship money, but you owe it to yourself to determine exactly what that amount will mean in the grand scheme of things.

Good luck!
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants!  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2016, 07:58
Pretty much just had my ass handed to me during the feedback session for my ding'ed application. It was like getting rejected all over again (the feeling of heartbreak and pain)! Once I recover, I'll appreciate the brutal honesty and specificity, I suppose. It is, after all, what I signed up for! :)
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants!   [#permalink] 19 Apr 2016, 07:58

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Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants!

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