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Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants!

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My Global First-Year Project with PERI in Germany [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2016, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: My Global First-Year Project with PERI in Germany
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By Nicholas Ritter T'17


Nick Ritter is a second-year student at the Tuck School of Business. Prior to Tuck, Nick worked as an electrical and product engineer for Nabsys, a biotech startup developing genomic sequencing technology. This summer, he will be working with IBM Watson's Life Sciences team in New York, NY. In his free time at Tuck, Nick is a Tripod Hockey Captain, Revers Energy Fellow, and admissions associate. He is also attempting to form a team to compete in the Tobogganing National Championships and hopes to ultimately create a Tuck Toboggan Club.

A team of Tuck students and I had the privilege of spending almost two weeks with PERI, a worldwide leading manufacturer and supplier of formwork and scaffolding systems, led by Alex Schwoerer T’02, a Tuck alumnus who is growing his family’s business in Ulm, Germany. To say that PERI was a phenomenal host is an understatement. With meetings that ran like clockwork, dinners in Ulm every night, and complete access to every business unit in PERI, the company generously opened its doors and gave us an inside look into how a successful German company runs.

On our first day, Alex and his management team began our visit with a tour of their headquarters and production plant. More than 90 percent of PERI’s formwork and scaffolding material is produced from the Weissenhorn location (just outside of Ulm). From highly automated production lines for making wooden girders to the semi-automated welding processes, PERI has invested significant resources to provide high quality scaffolding at a competitive price. In addition, having its production only a few feet away from the product development, sales, and marketing teams, PERI is able to more effectively integrate and streamline its new products’ life cycles.  Unfortunately, given confidentiality reasons, Image
we were not able to take pictures of the production, but PERI still allowed us to examine every aspect of the process. Finally, we were fortunate enough to spend time with every team from legal to sales, and it was clear from the efficiency in our meetings (e.g. information sharing, timeliness, etc.) that PERI held high expectations for our project’s results.

And the adventure did not end with the visit to PERI. Our team spent every night in the quaint, historic town of Ulm, Germany. Alex treated us to traditional German schnitzel, käsespätzle, and weissbier, and we spent a few days touring the area to discover that Ulm is both the birthplace of Albert Einstein and has the tallest church in the world.  Not to mention, the people of Ulm were both friendly and accommodating in every possible way. For anyone considering an international FYP project next year, I highly recommend that you apply for this project. It was the perfect way to experience Bavaria and connect with new people in a foreign country.

Finally, I cannot give enough credit to the PERI team for how helpful and generous they were with their time and resources. Gerd and Carl, PERI’s Middle East representatives, spent the entire week in Germany solely for our project.  Alex’s assistant, Jan, hosted us for dinner several times and fulfilled every request we had for meeting with experts within the company. Also, anytime we wanted to speak with a PERI employee, we could reach them within minutes and setup a meeting immediately. Not only were all of PERI’s employees willing and able to answer our questions, but we could tell that they genuinely enjoyed meeting with us and were passionate about PERI’s products. All in all, this was a tremendous experience. I wish we could have stayed longer, and I left Germany excited that we could spend the next three months working with PERI from Hanover, NH.

Last but not least, PERI surprised me with a birthday wish (see below)!

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What's a First-Year Project? We had a team of students who worked with Under Armour for their FYP explain.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants! [#permalink]

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New post 27 May 2016, 08:55
Hola! This is only relevant for admits from Spain & Portugal (or with high interest in working mainly in these markets based in Madrid!). I have just seen in Facebook the following:

Bain & Company Madrid Office is planning a Pre-MBA event at 19:30 in June 23rd and would like to invite the Tuck Dartmouth Class of 2018 admits. It is a unique opportunity to understand what we do in Strategy Consulting very early on!

Please **send an email to Patricia Miralles (patricia.miralles{@}bain{.}com, I can't write it as a normal email address, but you only have to delete the brackets) ** if you would like to attend, and she will answer back to you, or you can follow the instructions in the web page of Bain Madrid, where you also have more information.

If you are interested in Bain Madrid, even if you can't attend, also let her know!

Congratulations on your admission!

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Straight Outta Q&A: Starting a Student Club [#permalink]

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New post 31 May 2016, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Straight Outta Q&A: Starting a Student Club
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While the questions we hear in our on-campus Q&A session (part of every prospective student visit) can run the gamut, some stick out as being really insightful and others we hear over and over again. Wouldn’t it be great if we could share those answers with all prospective students? We think so! Enter a new blog series, "Straight Outta Q&A." 

Tuck 360 is awesome, but make sure you join us live too. Visits and interviews will begin again in September—create a Tuck profile and you’ll be notified when registration is open. For now, here's a great question that's come up more than once. Keep an eye out for more posts “straight outta Q&A,” during the 2016-2017 admissions cycle! 

Q: If there’s interest in a student-club that doesn’t currently exist, can students start a new one?

Club Reps on the Student Board, Tory Bratt T’17 and Giuliana Vetrano T’16, weigh in below.

A: Yes!

Tuck has over 75 student-run clubs and organizations. These include career clubs, sports teams, cultural affinity groups, service organizations, social clubs, special interest groups, and leadership teams for major campus events, such as Winter Carnival.

Even with this many clubs, Tuckies are constantly thinking of new activities, initiatives, and learning opportunities to rally around. The Student Board and MBA Program Office encourage diversity and inclusiveness in all student clubs and events, and students are always welcome to apply for funding to launch a new club or plan a new event that will enrich the Tuck community.

In the 2015-2016 academic year, the Tuck Student Board approved three new clubs: Design Club, Tuck Film Society, and the Cheesemongers—a trio that represents the variety of interests in the Tuck student body.

To receive approval for a new club, the club sponsors are required to draft a charter stating their purpose and proposed role in the community, demonstrate student support for the club, and present the club idea to the Student Board. The Student Board then votes to approve or deny club establishment. If a club is approved, it receives probationary status for the first year, meaning it must request ad hoc funding from the Student Board to fund its events and activities. If the probationary year proves to be successful, the club receives an allocated budget during the spring budget cycle.

Tuck’s clubs are an essential part of our close-knit community. The club system reflects not only the enormous creativity and enthusiasm of Tuckies, but also the dedication of Student Board members and the support of the school administration. 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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#IAMTUCK: A Day in the Life of Berny T’08 [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2016, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: #IAMTUCK: A Day in the Life of Berny T’08
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Bernardo (Berny) Barrera T'08, is a managing partner in a boutique consulting firm: Growth & Profit Consulting (http://www.gpcmx.com) based in Monterrey, Mexico which serves private businesses throughout the country. Bernardo is also a visiting professor at IPADE's MBA in Monterrey and Mexico City, where he teaches Case Analysis (AGM equivalent). He is married to Caty Elizondo TP'08, who is now the admissions market rep for Tuck in Mexico, and together they have 3 wonderful kids: Santiago (5), Benjamin (4), and Amanda (1). Bernardo likes sports, particularly football (soccer), movies, and has become a fan of audiobooks. He likes to read about Philosophy, Education, Justice, and Behavioral Economics; which learned about in MDM during his time at Tuck.

Berny recently took over the Tuck School Instagram to share what a typical day in the life is for him at Growth & Profit Consulting. 

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Hi all! Berny here taking over... Although this pic is from yesterday (sorry, couldn't get the school to reschedule their Christmas festival), I wanted to share it for my #DayInTheLife. Family is important, and this was clear for us since our time at Tuck - where Caty (my wife in background) always was involved and welcomed. Happy wife is a happy life can be translated to happy family (but harder to rhyme!). I'm lucky to be able to design a work-life balance where I can live important moments with my kids, like their 8 am festival. More on the implications of this with consulting later on!

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My favorite corner in the office - our library - which has books, that some say have even been read. Proudly wearing a #Tuckstuff belt. There is a section on behavioral economics, which I first learned about in MDM class with the late Professor Kent Womack. Learning about behavioral biases and our own subjectivity has helped me better understand the people behind the tupical business dynamics and how to better help them.

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At GPC, we have Office Taco Friday! Although this isn't a scheme to conquer the world as in Lego Movie, it's a chance to relax for a while and have a good breakfast taco. On the right side pic, we're having our end of year calibration for people evaluation, development, and bonuses. I always say that some of the best Tuck teachings come from access to leadership positions outside of the classroom. As soccer captains in the Tuck MBA World Cup, we had difficult conversations on how to build the team - there were 40+ people interested in a 20 person team. What was important? Winning? Inclusiveness? Balance! It's harder to put in practice though, where we try to keep a focus on constructive development.

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Lunch at home with the family! Note the Murphy's painting in the back (2008 facade) - a graduation present from our good friend from Argentina T08 Antonio Zavalia. This type of scene is part of the balance we seek in our office culture. Maybe we'll go a little slower, charge a little less, but individually we'll be more complete persons.

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We also have clients, who listen to our advice, particularly when we manage to grow a halo. This happens when our ideas are brilliant, but more frequently when light reflects off the whiteboard in the right direction. #HolyAdvice

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That's it for today! It was great sharing the experience. And what better way to end the day than with a "Posada" - Literally "Inn" in English, a Catholic Christmas tradition in Mexico, recalling Jesus's birth. But what it really means for everyone here is: Party! From all of us here at GPC, Happy Holidays! If you want to chat: @bernybar. Signing off before things get out of hand. Thanks for following along today! #IAmTuck
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Interview Etiquette: In-person & via Skype [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2016, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Interview Etiquette: In-person & via Skype
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An Associate Director of Admissions and the Regional Director of Southeast Asia, Sudershan ‘Suds’ Tirumala is back on the MBA Crystal Ball blog. This time around he shares tips on what you should—and shouldn’t—do during an MBA interview, whether it’s in person or over Skype. Tuck's 2016-2017 visit and interview season will begin in September (look for registration to open in August). Three (or more) months from now may seem like a long time...but if you start preparing now, you’re more likely to nail it later! 

An MBA interview should be treated no less seriously than a job interview. Even at Tuck, where we strive to make it a comfortable and conversational experience, we still want to know that this is important to you and that you carry yourself with a professional presence. You can read Suds' entire post here, but we've shared our favorite pieces of advice below. 

All Interviews

 

Don’t be late.

It reflects poorly on you if you’re late to an interview. If the circumstances are beyond your control (flight delay/traffic etc.), make sure you give a heads up to the interviewer so it’s not a mark against you even before the interview begins.

Ideally, you should have planned ahead, but in case of an exigency, don’t forget to show minimum courtesy to the interviewer.

Make good eye contact.

Eye contact is a proxy for confidence. When your eyes wander or don’t focus on the person in front of you, that makes it seem like you’re not sure of what you’re saying or that you’re not comfortable in your shoes.

When being asked a question or when answering the question, have adequate eye contact to demonstrate that you’re totally into the conversation that’s unfolding.

Don’t talk about how smart you are.

Yes, you may be good, and people around you must have told you so, but for you to keep talking about how intelligent you are in an interview doesn’t bode well for the outcome.

The interviewer may conclude you’re very self-focused, and are not able to empathize with others. Such conclusions almost never lead to a positive impression of your team skills. Let your actions speak for you.

Strike up a conversation.

An interview is an opportunity to showcase the best about you, so don’t let it devolve into a just another question and answer session. Get into a conversational mode and engage the interviewer.

But remember, there’s a fine line between striking a conversation that is genuine and forcing a conversation just for the sake of doing so.

 

Skype Specific

 

Be aware of your visual background.

It’s a competitive pool out there, so why would you want to get on Skype without paying attention to what’s behind you the interviewer can see? I’ve seen open bathroom doors, open closets stuffed with clothes, generally unkempt surroundings—I can go on.

The idea is not so much about this being a negative, but about how it takes the sheen away from an otherwise excellent interview. Ultimately, when you’re being compared to the broader applicant pool and there’s someone else with an identical or close to identical profile who paid attention to what’s behind them…guess who’s going to make a more positive impression?

Use of notes.

Absolute no, no. This is by far, the biggest problem among Indian interview candidates. They think having notes on the table doesn’t hurt since the interviewer can’t see them. The problem is, the camera is telling the interviewer where the candidate is looking. And believe it or not, the interviewer can tell very easily when someone is referring to notes, no matter how discreet the candidate thinks she/he is being.

Looking at notes even once during the interview, invariably turns into a look-at-notes-all-the-time extravaganza, and ultimately reflects you in poor light and demonstrates a lack of judgment. Would you do that when you’re having an in-person interview? I hope not! If that’s the case, why would you do it in a Skype interview?

Having other people in the room.

It’s not a distraction for the interviewer as much as it is for the candidate. I’ve heard giggles in the same room while I’m on Skype with the candidate.

I’ve seen candidates smile—almost laugh—inexplicably while they’re looking away from the screen (and I’m forced to make the assumption that they’re paying attention to someone else in the room) since the conversation we’re having is decidedly not funny.

 

In Conclusion

 

All in all, I’ve seen some very good candidates unravel in the interview, not because of what they said, but because of what they didn’t say and because of their actions. You owe it to yourself to not lose focus on what’s the final step in the MBA application process, having made stellar progress along the way.

It pays to be attentive. My simple advice to candidates: Think of a business school interview as a job interview. If you’re going to behave in a certain manner to make the best impression in a job interview, why would you do things any differently in an MBA interview? Follow this thumb rule and you should be fine. Good luck!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Discover the Pathways of Our Students [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jun 2016, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Discover the Pathways of Our Students
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“Being in this kind of environment invites me to be a better version of myself for the people around me.”

Dallas native Nancy Yang T'17 worked for Teach for America as a managing director before she decided to get her MBA. Nancy is a Harvard graduate who is interning at McKinsey & Co. this summer in the Seattle office. She came to Tuck because she wanted to learn—it's what she loves. 

"I wanted to learn new tools, new ways of thinking, new ideas. When I was getting to know the different schools, I felt Tuck took the learning and development of its students really seriously, and that stood out to me. The core curriculum was really coherent, and professors seemed really accessible. I came for the opportunities and recruiting successes, but primarily for the chance to really learn and expand my intellectual horizons."

Get to know Nancy's journey and others with Pathways

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Before the Application is Live [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2016, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Before the Application is Live
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The Class of 2018 isn’t even on campus yet, but we’re already in the process of recruiting the Tuck Class of 2019. For those of you who are also thinking about next year, here are some suggestions to get you started.

There are lots of details to take care of, from taking tests to updating your resume. But before you dive into all the administrative work that goes into your MBA application, take a step back. Look at the big picture; the MBA degree, your school(s) of choice, and you.

First, consider the MBA. Why this is the right degree for you? What can you gain from an MBA versus another degree? Talk to people you know with an MBA about their experience and what they learned. This gives you context to think about whether your understanding of the value of an MBA matches the reality. It also helps you to form the basis of your answer to the inevitable question during the application process, “Why do you want an MBA?”

Second, research the schools you’re considering. Learn what is distinctive about each school and program, as well as commonalities between them. Go back to what you wanted to get out of your MBA. How does each school fit your needs? Throw it all into an Excel spreadsheet if you want (you need to get comfortable with those anyway) and see how it fits your priorities.

Third, think about you: your career path so far, the decisions you’ve made along the way, and where you want to go two years from now, ten years from now, and beyond. What are your strengths and weaknesses? What skills do you want/need to develop to reach your goals? What are you looking for in a living and learning environment? What do you need outside of your academics to allow you to put your energy into your program?

The final step is to synthesize all the research you’ve done. Knowing yourself, identify what type of MBA makes sense for you and what schools offer the programs you want. Which of those schools best fit your personality but also challenge you to develop and stretch yourself?

There are lots of resources to help you in your research, but the most important resource you have right now is time. Next year’s applications will be out soon. Until then, use your time wisely to make the application process as smooth and stress-free as possible. Good luck!

Oh, and PS...our application and applicant-initiated interview deadlines are available here. You'll have a lot on your plate in the next several months, so make note of these dates now to keep you on track! 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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On the Use of Admissions Consultants [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2016, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: On the Use of Admissions Consultants
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Last week, Tuck’s Admissions Team had the pleasure of hosting about 35 admissions consultants from the Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants (AIGAC). We invited them to Hanover so they could learn more about Tuck, to answer their questions—to answer your questions—and of course, so we could learn more about them too.

There’s one thing that’s clear: There are appropriate and inappropriate ways to engage with admissions consultants and their services. And we should say from the get go, that AIGAC in particular is an organization that’s dedicated to promoting ethical practices in the industry and all of its members agree to adhere to a set of principles.

After lots of interaction, here’s Tuck’s take on using admissions consultants in the MBA application process:

The use of admissions consultants can raise eyebrows in Admissions offices. Why?

Our concern is that the work in your application is not your own. Ethics aside for the moment, how could we possibly assess whether you are a fit for our program or whether you are capable of the work we will ask of you if what you submit in your application isn’t yours? Added to that, the act of submitting someone else’s work as your own is just wrong.

If you use a consultant, it is important that the entire application is your ideas and your work, except the recommendation letters, of course, which should definitely NOT be yours. Be sure that your application reflects who you are.

There are no exceptions to this. None. Ever. Hopefully that’s clear now.

The appropriate usage.

Admissions consultants can be helpful in providing information about programs and acting as a sounding board as you flesh out your school wish list. Reputable consultants have experience in MBA programs and a broad understanding of the variety of schools out there.

Consultants can also assist on the path to reflection and discovery. A crucial component of your admissions process is knowing where you want to go. Sometimes we need someone on the outside asking the right questions to help us narrow down our goals and what we need in order to achieve them.

Preparation is key, and the right consultant can help there as well. You should be writing multiple drafts of your essays. Getting feedback is fine, whether it’s from your mother, your best friend, or a consultant, as long as the final product is written by you, in your voice, and reflecting your ideas and ambitions. In preparing for your interviews, you can bounce ideas off a consultant, practice with them, and decompress with them afterwards. But again, the hard work is all on you.

The inappropriate usage.

As I said above, all the work in your application should be your own. In the case of the recommendations, they should be the work of your recommenders only. It is a violation of the Tuck Honor Code to submit an application that is not exclusively your work or to submit recommendations that you or someone other than your recommender have written, even if at the request of your recommender.

So…do I need one of these admissions consultants to be competitive?

NO! Many, many people are admitted to business schools every year who do not use admissions consultants. Admissions consultants charge for their services and expertise. You absolutely can do all this work on your own, using school resources and your personal and professional networks as sources of information and sounding boards.

You might be wondering…

How could you possibly know if an applicant uses a consultant in an inappropriate way?

You’d be surprised. A dead giveaway is when you accidentally submit a draft copy of your essays with the consultant’s notes all over them. Rare, I grant you, but it’s happened. More commonly, something in your application raises doubts in our minds. We notice that, although your Analytical Writing Assessment, TOEFL or IELTS score is low, your essays are perfect. You seem to know the questions we’ll ask in the interview before we ask them. Now, you could have done this all on your own, but it gives us pause. In a competitive applicant pool, don’t give the Admissions Committee a reason to weed you out.

If I decide to use an admissions consultant, how do I find one?

Get referrals. Research the consulting firms and individual consultants. Talk to the consultants who make your short list and see if there’s a fit with you. Your consultant may offer a free consultation to make sure this can be a productive relationship. Understand clearly the services they offer and how they charge for their services. Don’t trust anyone who offers a guaranteed admission.

Because of their guiding principles, AIGAC is a great place to start. However, please note that it’s a relatively new organization, and its membership is still growing. Whether the consultants you are considering are members or not, the principles can give you a set of important considerations as you evaluate your options.

(Keep in mind, each MBA program you’re applying to may have a different take on the appropriate use of consultants. You should be aware of the policies of each school.)
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Connecting to the Upper Valley Community with Junior Achievement Volun [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2016, 13:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Connecting to the Upper Valley Community with Junior Achievement Volunteer Program
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By Anne de Saint Phalle T'17

I have always loved working with kids. When I got to Tuck in the fall, I joined the Education Club to learn about volunteer opportunities in the Upper Valley and meet classmates who shared my interest. Towards the end of the year, one of those classmates, Lauren Alpeyrie T’17, reached out to me to see if I wanted to volunteer for Junior Achievement, a Kindergarten through 12th grade program that fosters work-readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy skills through experiential learning, inspiring students to dream big and reach their full potential. I jumped at the opportunity. 

We were matched with a first grade class of about 20 students at Lyme Elementary School. Before our first day, we met with the Junior Achievement coordinator, Lorin Durand, who explained the program and provided lesson plans and materials to help us engage the students in each session. Lauren and I teamed up for the first class, and then each taught two sessions on our own.

Heading to the first session, we both agreed we were more anxious to teach the first class than we had been for most “firsts” at Tuck to date. Neither one of us had taught a class before. I began to question Image
the “pretend the audience is a group of first graders” advice I was given in my Management Communications course; even a group of first graders can be intimidating!

When we eventually met the kids, their excitement, positive energy, and carefree spirits were contagious and quickly put me at ease. Every student raised and waved their hands because they wanted so badly to participate in each lesson. It was a challenge to balance getting each child involved while maintaining control of the classroom. Over the course of the sessions I taught, we talked about the differences between families, the differences between wants and needs, and what jobs, entrepreneurs, and businesses are. Each student had unique contributions and even taught me that one of the main differences between families is that not all of them like to watch Dirty Dancing! They also gave me the invaluable, but admittedly too late, guidance that veterinary school makes you much cooler than business school does.  

While engrossed in the always-busy world of Tuck, it is easy to forget that we are a part of the broader Upper Valley community. Junior Achievement allowed me to feel more connected to this community and was a welcome break from my usual routine. First grade and business school can be very similar; both are places where you can learn just as much from your classmates as you can from your teachers, so it is important to speak up and share your thoughts and opinions. Most of all, working with the kids at Lyme Elementary School was a fun and rewarding experience, and I look forward to getting involved again next year.

Anne de Saint Phalle is a second-year student at Tuck. She grew up in Bronxville, NY and attended Williams College, where she majored in mathematics and psychology. Prior to Tuck, she worked at Promontory Financial Group, a strategy, risk management, and regulatory compliance consulting firm. This summer, she is working at Liberty Mutual in its Corporate Development Program.
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Denied? 3 Questions to Ask Before Reapplying [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2016, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Denied? 3 Questions to Ask Before Reapplying
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1) Are you targeting the right schools?

Make sure you’re being realistic. Though numbers don’t mean everything, consider recent class profiles of the schools you’re targeting in order to gauge whether your GMAT/GRE score and undergraduate GPA is above or around the average, within the 80% range, or below the 80% range. If you think you’ve found your dream MBA program, but don’t have a competitive test score, consider retaking it.

Also make sure you’re targeting schools that are a good cultural fit. For example, because of Tuck’s location and small scale, students have the opportunity to be fully engaged in their MBA experience. In fact, our culture nearly demands it. As a result, these engaged students who want to be active and contributing members of our community, are the exact applicants we love to see. If you’re getting an MBA so you can check the credential off your list but would prefer to anonymously float in and out of a classroom? Well, Tuck is not the school you. Do enough research about each program to know this.

2) What went wrong? Or better yet, where can I improve?

Now a bit removed from the process, applicants are often able to take a critical, more objective look, and recognize weak areas themselves. You can use Pat's 2015 post for additional guidance.

3) What do I need to do in order to be more competitive?

"Do" would be the operative word in that question. Once you’ve identified some areas for improvement, make sure you act on them. You should not expect to submit the same application and get a different result. And we repeat: Do not expect to submit the same application and get a different result! If nothing else, this tells us you don’t think getting an MBA at Tuck is important enough for you to spend any more time on.

The application process at a top business school like Tuck is incredibly competitive. There are always more applicants that are perfectly admissible than we are able to make offers to. That said, you should be doing everything you can to stand out, across as many measures as you can. For example: You took the GMAT once and got a solid 710, but you were scoring higher in your practice tests or just think you can do better. If you’re able to take it again, do it.

Also, think of this extra year as a blessing. You now have another year of work experience under your belt. Another year to take on new responsibilities, to lead and collaborate, to challenge yourself, to get involved, and to grow. You’ve had an extra year to talk to people and be introspective. As a result, you better understand your strengths, your weaknesses, and now you really know why you want a Tuck MBA! The essays are a great place to articulate all of this. Furthermore, you are now an even more experienced and confident professional—let that poise, presence, and communication skill shine through in the interview. 

If you continue to have a positive attitude and are committed to strengthening your application, the Tuck Admissions Committee views reapplicants favorably. After all, it’s a good sign that you genuinely want to be at Tuck—we want people who want to be here! 

Good luck with as you dive back into the application process, and we look forward to seeing you again. 
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Club Spotlight: Tuck Tech Club [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2016, 13:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Club Spotlight: Tuck Tech Club
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The Technology Club helps Tuck students learn about the roles that MBAs play at technology companies and gain exposure to different high-tech industries. Often, members also hold membership in other clubs like Marketing, Entrepreneurship, and General Management in order to better understand a particular area of interest, applying it to their knowledge of the technology industry gained from the Technology Club.

Aside from networking, case competitions, speakers, and other on-campus activities, the Technology Club also hosts the annual Geirheads Technology Conference, a one-day event in the fall featuring speakers, panels, and workshops focused on current trends in Tech. In the winter, the club coordinates an annual technology trek to Silicon Valley and Seattle, visiting the campuses of some of the top tech companies in the country and networking with West Coast alumni. Past tech treks have included visits to Google, Facebook, HubSpot, Intel, eBay, Amazon, Microsoft, Apple, Groupon, Pocket Gems, Tesla, IDEO, LinkedIn, Electronic Arts, and Yahoo.

For those looking to make a career switch into the technology industry, the Technology Club plays an integral role in supporting that journey. The club is very supportive throughout the recruiting process, often putting students in touch with Tuck alumni working in tech. The club helps review resumes, conduct mock interviews, and make connections so that you can expand your network outside of on-campus resources. The Tech Trek is also a great opportunity to establish initial contacts within a company, allowing them to network into their ideal summer internship. Being able to visit a company in person is also a great way to get a sense of whether or not the company or industry is a fit for you.

This year's Technology Club co-chairs are T'17s Ema Reid, Eduardo Gonzalez, Santhosh Havangi, and Yuri Maruyama. 

Visit the Center for Digital Strategies website to learn about other opportunities in technology at Tuck. 
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Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants! [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2016, 10:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck’s 2016-2017 Essay Questions
Image
As regular readers of our blog, you know we value transparency and thorough communication. With that in mind, we wanted to alert you to a change in the wording of our first essay. While the core information we are seeking is the same, we are providing you with more context on why that information is important to us.

Below is our original post on our essays, with the revised wording for the first essay. Good luck!

Tuck has long provided its graduates with the knowledge and inspiration to do well and do good – to become the difference in the world of business and beyond. As the global economy continues to become more dynamic and diverse, the call for broad, values-driven leadership will continue to grow louder. With this in mind, we’ve made some changes to this year's essay questions, so please read carefully.

Remember, the essays are your opportunity to share with us who you are beyond the numbers and the resume, so reflect, take your time, and be genuine. Think carefully about your content as well as delivery. Communicate clearly and in your voice, not who you think we want you to be; and most importantly, answer the question you are asked.

Though the application isn’t live quite yet (soon!!), here’s a look at the 2016-2017 essay questions.


Essays

Please respond fully but concisely to the following essay questions. There are no right or wrong answers. We encourage applicants to limit the length of their responses to 500 to 700 words for Essay #1 and 500 words for Essay #2. Please double-space your responses.

  • (Required) Tuck educates wise leaders who better the world of business. What are your short- and long-term goals? How will a Tuck MBA enable you to become a wise leader with global impact?
  • (Required) As a diverse and global community, our students arrive at the same place from many different paths. Tell us about an experience in which you have had to live, learn and/or work with other people very different from yourself. What challenges and/or opportunities did you experience, how did you respond, and what did you learn about yourself as a result?
  • (Optional) Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.
  • (Required from Reapplicants) How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied? Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally.

Make note of our 2016-2017 application deadlines, and allow yourself plenty of time to submit your strongest possible application. Good luck!

 
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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants! [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2016, 11:27
Essays are not updated on the website yet.. or am I missing something?

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Re: Tuck (Dartmouth): Class of 2018 - Calling All Applicants! [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2016, 11:32
HaddyPainkiller wrote:
Essays are not updated on the website yet.. or am I missing something?

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Hello from Hanover! The new essays can be found on our blog: http://www.tuck.dartmouth.edu/mba/blog/ ... -questions

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Club Spotlight: The Entrepreneurship Club [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2016, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Club Spotlight: The Entrepreneurship Club
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By Apurva Sacheti T'16

Have an idea? Searching for useful resources and well-wishers to get you kick started? The Entrepreneurship Club at Tuck strives to save the most valuable asset your startup has—time—by organizing informational and networking sessions, workshops, and useful resources that have proven to be useful to entrepreneurs at Tuck and beyond. Here are two ways you can leverage the E-ship club at Tuck:

Get into the entrepreneurship ecosystem.

E-ship club familiarizes entrepreneurial Tuckies to a number of opportunities and useful resources at Tuck and Dartmouth. Through the club, you can learn about which entrepreneurship courses at Tuck rock, how you can get access to seed funding on Dartmouth’s campus, and acquire information about global entrepreneurship competitions that will help you raise $$(!). Rob Thelen T’16 was working on his idea to create a more efficient way to share social and contact information. Becoming a part of the E-ship ecosystem early on, he learned about opportunities to gain seed funding and picked up $5,000 from the Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network. Rob is at the verge of launching the beta version of Fliqapp—his mobile application—soon!

Find the right people and skills.

Getting connected to like-minded people can help otherwise lone entrepreneurs seek advice, acquire a support group, and refine their ideas. Justin Gerrard T’16, founder of BAE, a dating application, says, “My classmates in the E-ship club provided me a support structure and network of confidants who gave me the drive and insights to launch my venture with confidence.”

The E-ship club, for many Tuckies like Justin, is a place to get connected—whether it’s to find your co-founder or find a helpful Tuckie with a useful skill that you might need. The E-ship Club endeavors to be a melting pot of people and resources that are valuable to a successful entrepreneurial ecosystem.

These are just two ways that the Club can help you work on your idea. Moreover, as part of the Club you also get the opportunity to mold its initiatives and bring new opportunities to entrepreneurially-minded Tuckies, so as to further the Club’s mission to help Tuckies succeed in the startup ecosystem, today and in the future.

Apurva Sacheti is a T'16 and part of the Entrepreneurship Club at Tuck. Prior to Tuck, Apurva worked on two entrepreneurial ventures, in the quick service restaurant and e-learning sectors in India respectively. Apurva completed his bachelor of engineering in electronics and communication from Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra in 2009.
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Creating a Successful Application Strategy [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jul 2016, 06:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Creating a Successful Application Strategy
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By Stephanie Butler, Assistant Director of Admissions

Hello! Thanks to everyone who joined me last week for online Q&A. You had so many great questions. Before our chat got started, I offered some advice for creating a successful application strategy. If you couldn’t make it last Tuesday, here’s the gist. And by gist, I mean a slightly cleaned up version of my notes!

 

 

  • Give yourself time.

    • Giving yourself time to reflect and be introspective is just as important as giving yourself time to write essays or study for the GMAT/GRE.  
    • Ask yourself: Why MBA, why now, what are my goals? What do I want from my career? My life? What is my story and how do I tell it in a compelling way? How will I be able to contribute to an MBA program?

       
  • Get the GMAT/GRE out of the way.
    • The application process is not easy, and should not be rushed. (Yes, I'm repeating this one.)
    • Taking it early allows you time to retake if necessary—or if you simply think you can do better.  
    • It takes some of the pressure off, so you can focus on other things like essays, interview prep, and school visits.

       
  • Decide which schools to apply to.
    • Benchmark yourself using class profiles.
    • Determine whether you’re a cultural fit—talk to Tuck when we’re on the road, talk to Tuckies at work or through your personal networks, utilize online opportunities (like chats or Tuck Connections), VISIT!
    • School exploration is an ongoing process—you’ll probably have another (tougher) decision to make later.

       
  • Create a timeline.
    • Keep track of it ALL—deadlines, interview policies, notification dates, etc.—whether it’s on your Outlook Calendar, your iPhone, or in an Excel doc.  
    • Make your recommenders aware of deadlines too!
    • Read all instructions carefully…every school will be different. Take notes.

       
  • Think about your finances.
    • Understand that business school is expensive (and brace yourself for it), but don’t be scared off by the price tag—consider ROI too.
      • It can be hard to do, but try to think about ROI in non-monetary terms too. Things like your network, experiences, and personal growth can be just as important. 
    • Save money, try to get your credit in good shape, maybe don’t buy a fancy car…
    • Don’t assume you’ll get a scholarship. Have a plan.

A little planning and organization on the frontend will not only make your life easier and less anxiety filled, but it will likely lead to stronger application as well.

Good luck!

P.S. Sorry, no transcript for the Q&A portion. You'll just have to join us next time!
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Tuck’s 2016-2017 Essay Questions (Revised) [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2016, 20:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck’s 2016-2017 Essay Questions (Revised)
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As regular readers of our blog, you know we value transparency and thorough communication. With that in mind, we wanted to alert you to a change in the wording of our first essay. While the core information we are seeking is the same, we are providing you with more context on why that information is important to us.

Below is our original post on our essays, with the revised wording for the first essay. Good luck!

Tuck has long provided its graduates with the knowledge and inspiration to do well and do good – to become the difference in the world of business and beyond. As the global economy continues to become more dynamic and diverse, the call for broad, values-driven leadership will continue to grow louder. With this in mind, we’ve made some changes to this year's essay questions, so please read carefully.

Remember, the essays are your opportunity to share with us who you are beyond the numbers and the resume, so reflect, take your time, and be genuine. Think carefully about your content as well as delivery. Communicate clearly and in your voice, not who you think we want you to be; and most importantly, answer the question you are asked.

Though the application isn’t live quite yet (soon!!), here’s a look at the 2016-2017 essay questions.

Essays

Please respond fully but concisely to the following essay questions. There are no right or wrong answers. We encourage applicants to limit the length of their responses to 500 to 700 words for Essay #1 and 500 words for Essay #2. Please double-space your responses.

  • (Required) Tuck educates wise leaders who better the world of business. What are your short- and long-term goals? How will a Tuck MBA enable you to become a wise leader with global impact?

  • (Required) As a diverse and global community, our students arrive at the same place from many different paths. Tell us about an experience in which you have had to live, learn and/or work with other people very different from yourself. What challenges and/or opportunities did you experience, how did you respond, and what did you learn about yourself as a result?

  • (Optional) Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

  • (Required from Reapplicants) How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied? Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally.

     

Make note of our 2016-2017 application deadlines, and allow yourself plenty of time to submit your strongest possible application. Good luck!
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5 Steps to Essays AdCom will Appreciate [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2016, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: 5 Steps to Essays AdCom will Appreciate
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Tuck’s 2016-2017 essay questions are now live on Tuck 360. While essays can be one of the most challenging aspects of any MBA application, they can also be one of the most illuminating, for both the applicant and the admissions committee.

The MBA application process is an opportunity to reflect on your experiences, your plans for the future and what motivates you. You may find yourself with little time to spend on introspection, but don’t let it fall by the wayside! Not only will it lead to a stronger, more compelling application, but it also helps us understand how compatible you are with our program. Also, by getting to know yourself and understanding your motivations, the entire application process will seem easier—spend a little more time now, save a little more time (and anxiety) later.

As you begin to write your MBA essays, keep the following tips in mind:

1) Be authentic. Don’t write your essay based on what you think the admissions committee wants to hear. In fact, there is never one response (or even a handful of responses) that we’re looking for. Instead, approach your essays with your individual accomplishments, experiences and goals in mind. Here’s where that introspection will pay dividends!

2) Answer the question being asked. This may seem obvious, but applicants sometimes get so caught up in the story they want to tell that they lose sight of question being presented. Also keep this in mind when you’re tempted to stretch one response to fit four different essay questions, at four different schools.

3) Staying as close to the recommended word limit as possible will help you be concise and articulate. In our experience, applicants who adhere to the suggested limit stay on topic. While we don’t count the words in every essay, we will notice when you meander and ramble. 

4) Proofread, review, repeat. Again, this may seem obvious, but it’s easy to overlook some pretty big mistakes (referring to another school for example). Have someone you trust read your essays—does it sound like you? Have someone you don’t know as well read your essays—does it make sense? Finally, reading your essays out loud can bring grammatical errors and unclear sentences to light, even after you’ve ready them silently 782 times.

5) Don’t forget to include the “why” and the “how.” For example: It’s wonderful that you want to pursue a career in healthcare post-MBA, but nothing in your background is healthcare related—why is it important to you to make this transition? How will you take advantage of Tuck’s MBA program to help you achieve this? Show us that you’ve put serious thought and effort into this next step. Simply stating a goal and listing a bunch of courses isn’t going to help you stand out.   

If you're considering writing your essays as a haiku, or just want some more essay insight, check out this post from Senior Associate Director of Admissions Amy Mitson: Creating Memorable Essays...and Memorable in a Good Way.

Good luck! We look forward to learning about you all! 
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Club Spotlight: Tuck Consulting Club [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2016, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Club Spotlight: Tuck Consulting Club
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The Tuck Consulting Club is a student-run organization serving students pursuing careers in management, strategy, health care, and organization consulting. The club has two primary objectives; to help studentspursue careers in consulting, and to serve as a point of contact between Tuck students interested in consulting and the greater community. 

The club fulfills its objective by:

  • Helping members understand what consultants do
  • Hosting activities to connect students with firms and their peers
  • Providing resources and opportunities to prepare for consulting interviews

The club also plans a number of events and activities during the school year, including:

  • Panel discussions with recent Tuck graduates working in consulting
  • Introductory course on case interviewing for first-year students
  • Refresher course on case-interviewing for second-year students
  • Recruiting trek to Boston and potentially other locations
  • Résumé reviews
  • Mock interviews and case-interview preparation marathons
  • Brown bag lunches with second-year students who have completed internships with firms

Feedback from alumni who were involved with the club:

“The Tuck Consulting Club gave me all the tools and training necessary to recruit successfully at the major consulting firms. The consulting club contributed to my success in a wide range of capacities, ranging from the case books / other resources we were provided, to the administrative support throughout the recruiting season, to (especially) the countless hours that club members dedicated to teaching frameworks and practicing mock interviews.”

—Amanda Grosse T’15

"The tremendous help I received from the Consulting Club: prep material, case workshops, one on one case prep with the seniors - is the only reason I was successful in my summer recruiting. The club did a great job of exemplifying Tuck's close knit and helpful culture."

—Ankit Sood T’15

"The Consulting Club was the vehicle to put me in touch with second years and fellow classmates to practice my interviews and secure offers in two major firms"

—Pablo Segovia Smith T’15
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Another Great Year for the Center for Digital Strategies at Tuck [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2016, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Another Great Year for the Center for Digital Strategies at Tuck
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By Patrick Wheeler

Patrick is the program manager of the Center for Digital Strategies at Tuck. The CDS focuses on enabling business strategy and innovation. Digital strategies and information technologies that harness a company's unique competencies can push business strategy to a new level. At the center, we foster intellectual leadership by forging a learning community of scholars, executives, and students focused on the role of digital strategies in creating competitive advantage in corporations and value chains. We accomplish this mission by conducting high-impact research; creating a dialog between CIOs and their functional executive colleagues; and driving an understanding of digital strategies into the MBA curriculum. 

Our student programs reached a huge number of Tuck students this year from a wide-ranging list of events featuring guests from an excellent assortment of companies from around the globe..

As you can see in the infographic below, CDS welcomed 31 individual executives to campus (physically and virtually) from two dozen companies. Our programs reached an audience size of 820 students across our Britt Technology Impact Series, Digital Drop-In videoconferences, and other programming. A few highlights from the year:

  • We kicked off the year in August at Google’s Mountain View headquarters with a talk from Pandora Media on the future of streaming music
  • We welcomed a group of alumni MBA fellows from the classes of 2006 and 2011 back to the center to meet with MBA fellows
  • The Tuck Technology Club held its annual conference to a record crowd of over 150 students in October, and included several members of the center's Roundtable on Digital Strategies as panelists on the topic of personalization technology
  • Amazon’s Senior Vice President of Worldwide Business Development, Jeff Blackburn D’91, filled Georgiopoulos Classroom for a unique look inside Amazon’s evolution and future growth strategies, including details on streaming video and the use of drones to deliver goods
  • The team from frog design spoke to a standing room-only audience followed by a student design-thinking workshop with students, staff and faculty to practice tools used by frog designers
  • MBA fellows learned about pure-play ecommerce companies moving into physical retail from Warby Parker’s Director of New Stores and Facilities, Sarah Apgar T’11 in a Digital Drop-In videoconference
  • We wrapped up the year discussing topics ranging from the blockchain to autonomous vehicles with financial services companies in May

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Another Great Year for the Center for Digital Strategies at Tuck   [#permalink] 22 Jul 2016, 07:00

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