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With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perh

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Re: With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perh  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2016, 19:35
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paidlukkha wrote:
is this part underlined in the Q or not?
public health and safety there

Why is B wrong?


Hi paidlukkha, my mistake, I've edited the question.

Regarding B, the structure "the construction (preposition) + NOUN + VERBing" is WRONG, unless the preposition refers directly to the NOUN
you can refer explanation of Ron here :https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/forums/post26678.html#p26678
Additional: in this case you can think "expecting...." is a V-ing modifier to "California", but I think the preposition refers to the action, not the NOUN

Another point, if "With California expecting..." is the short of "With California which expects....", this is impossible as California cannot expect anything itself, it's not human being to expect anything.

Besides, "the administration's concern has grown increasingly", I think this subject not make sense, a concern cannot increase about something, the subject must be "The administration", not the concern.



B. With California expecting to see severe electricity shortfalls this summer, and there will possibly be blackouts for as much as 30 days, the administration's concern has grown increasingly about
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Re: With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perh  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2016, 10:37
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johng2016 wrote:
With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about public health and safety there.


A. With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about

B. With California expecting to see severe electricity shortfalls this summer, and there will possibly be blackouts for as much as 30 days, the administration's concern has grown increasingly about

C. As California is expected to be seeing severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as much as 30 days this summer, the administration's concern is increasing for

D. Insofar as California is expected to see severe electricity shortfalls this summer, and there will possibly be blackouts on as many as 30 days, the administration has increasing concern about

E. Insofar as California expects to see severe electricity shortfalls and the possibility of blackouts for as much as 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about


IMHO (A) for the hihglighted errors in the options ...

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Re: With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perh  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2017, 09:36
Michael KC Chen wrote:
With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about public health and safety there

A. With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about

B. With California expecting to see severe electricity shortfalls this summer, and there will possibly be blackouts for as much as 30 days, the administration's concern has grown increasingly about

C. As California is expected to be seeing severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as much as 30 days this summer, the administration's concern is increasing for

D. Insofar as California is expected to see severe electricity shortfalls this summer, and there will possibly be blackouts as many as 30 days, the administration has increasing concern about

E. Insofar as California expects to see severe electricity shortfalls and the possibility of blackouts for 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about



Hi mikemcgarry,

Though I understand why A is correct, I would require a bit of your help here.

1. I wanted to understand the difference between the usage of expected in A vs expecting and B.
2. Also, is "to be seeing" as mentioned in C idiomatic ?

Thanks in advance :-)
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Re: With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perh  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Nov 2017, 11:27
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Poorvasha wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry,

Though I understand why A is correct, I would require a bit of your help here.

1. I wanted to understand the difference between the usage of expected in A vs expecting and B.
2. Also, is "to be seeing" as mentioned in C idiomatic ?

Thanks in advance :-)

Dear Poorvasha,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, the "to be seeing" in (C) is train wreck wrong. This is very specifically a trap for all the non-native speakers who do not understand the difference between the present and the present progressive. We use the progressive tenses when we want to emphasis that the action is in the process of taking place: we are emphasizing the action as an ongoing activity. The "seeing" will happen, but we are not concerned with the actual performance of this activity. The progressive tense is utterly useless in this context.

The construction in (A) is a some rare and extremely sophisticated construction. The construction in (B) is a typical mistake pattern. See:
with + [noun] + [participle] on GMAT Sentence Correction

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perh  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Dec 2017, 19:32
can some one explain how is parallelism maintained in A?

With california expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer.

perhaps is an adverb, is it used as adverbial modifier such as [and therefore, and thus] ?

thanks.
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Re: With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perh  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2017, 10:24
Avinash_R1 wrote:
can some one explain how is parallelism maintained in A?

With california expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer.

perhaps is an adverb, is it used as adverbial modifier such as [and therefore, and thus] ?

thanks.

Dear Avinash_R1,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, my friend, I am going to say that you need to gain more experience reading. Your question is precisely the sort of question asked by someone who has learned a lot of individual technical rules but who has less experience with reading in context. Context is everything in language! It is absolutely impossible to arrive at GMAT SC mastery by learning some chimerical "complete" collection of rules. To perform at a high level on GMAT SC, you have to develop the "feel" of the language and, for a non-native speaker, this comes only from cultivating a rigorous habit of reading. See:
How to Improve Your GMAT Verbal Score

The parallelism here is 100% correct. The infinitive verb "see" has two parallel direct objects, "severe electricity shortfalls" and "blackouts," but it has a slightly different relationship to these two direct objects. The sentence conveys with certainty that, yes, the folks in California will "severe electricity shortfalls;" by contrast, we don't know for sure whether California will see "blackouts." The sentence very elegantly denotes this by putting this adverb, "perhaps," in front of the second direct object blackouts." This adverb, of course, reaches back and modifies the verb "to see"--unlike noun modifiers, adverbs and verb modifiers are not under the jurisdiction of the Modifier Touch Rule. The verb has a relationship with two direct objects in parallel, and the adverb modifies one of those two relationships. This is perfectly correct.

Non-native students, especially those who excel in math, are likely to fall into certain misunderstandings about parallelism. The most common of these is that parallelism requires some kind of precise mathematical equivalence between the two element, and that any deviation from strict equality is a violation of parallelism. That is a completely disastrous misunderstanding of the nature of parallelism. Fundamentally, parallelism is NOT a grammatical structure. Instead, parallelism is a logical structure, and the purpose of matching grammar is to support and elucidate the logic. All kinds of quite different looking elements can be in parallel. Again, it's hard to spell out the limits of parallelism in explicit rules: some of it necessarily involves a "feel" for the language, which, again, one acquires through a rigorous habit of reading.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perh  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2017, 12:13
mikemcgarry wrote:
Avinash_R1 wrote:
can some one explain how is parallelism maintained in A?

With california expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer.

perhaps is an adverb, is it used as adverbial modifier such as [and therefore, and thus] ?

thanks.

Dear Avinash_R1,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, my friend, I am going to say that you need to gain more experience reading. Your question is precisely the sort of question asked by someone who has learned a lot of individual technical rules but who has less experience with reading in context. Context is everything in language! It is absolutely impossible to arrive at GMAT SC mastery by learning some chimerical "complete" collection of rules. To perform at a high level on GMAT SC, you have to develop the "feel" of the language and, for a non-native speaker, this comes only from cultivating a rigorous habit of reading. See:
How to Improve Your GMAT Verbal Score

The parallelism here is 100% correct. The infinitive verb "see" has two parallel direct objects, "severe electricity shortfalls" and "blackouts," but it has a slightly different relationship to these two direct objects. The sentence conveys with certainty that, yes, the folks in California will "severe electricity shortfalls;" by contrast, we don't know for sure whether California will see "blackouts." The sentence very elegantly denotes this by putting this adverb, "perhaps," in front of the second direct object blackouts." This adverb, of course, reaches back and modifies the verb "to see"--unlike noun modifiers, adverbs and verb modifiers are not under the jurisdiction of the Modifier Touch Rule. The verb has a relationship with two direct objects in parallel, and the adverb modifies one of those two relationships. This is perfectly correct.

Non-native students, especially those who excel in math, are likely to fall into certain misunderstandings about parallelism. The most common of these is that parallelism requires some kind of precise mathematical equivalence between the two element, and that any deviation from strict equality is a violation of parallelism. That is a completely disastrous misunderstanding of the nature of parallelism. Fundamentally, parallelism is NOT a grammatical structure. Instead, parallelism is a logical structure, and the purpose of matching grammar is to support and elucidate the logic. All kinds of quite different looking elements can be in parallel. Again, it's hard to spell out the limits of parallelism in explicit rules: some of it necessarily involves a "feel" for the language, which, again, one acquires through a rigorous habit of reading.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


thanks mike. i have understood it now.

can
WITH be followed by a clause as it is in this statement?
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New post 27 Dec 2017, 16:12
Avinash_R1 wrote:

thanks mike. i have understood it now.

can
WITH be followed by a clause as it is in this statement?




Hello Avinash_R1,

I will be glad to answer this one for you. :-)

Please note that with is a preposition and is ALWAYS followed by a noun or a noun phrase. It is never followed by a clause.

In this official sentence also, with is NOT followed by a clause. See, a Subject-Verb (SV) pair makes a clause. However, there is no SV pair immediately after the preposition with as we can see in the following structure:

With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about public health and safety there.

With is followed by the noun California that is followed by the verb-ed (noun) modifier expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer.

There is no SV pair in the structure immediately following with. Hence, with is NOT followed by a clause in the original sentence.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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New post 27 Dec 2017, 19:49
egmat wrote:
Avinash_R1 wrote:

thanks mike. i have understood it now.

can
WITH be followed by a clause as it is in this statement?




Hello Avinash_R1,

I will be glad to answer this one for you. :-)

Please note that with is a preposition and is ALWAYS followed by a noun or a noun phrase. It is never followed by a clause.

In this official sentence also, with is NOT followed by a clause. See, a Subject-Verb (SV) pair makes a clause. However, there is no SV pair immediately after the preposition with as we can see in the following structure:

With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about public health and safety there.

With is followed by the noun California that is followed by the verb-ed (noun) modifier expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer.

There is no SV pair in the structure immediately following with. Hence, with is NOT followed by a clause in the original sentence.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha



Thanks very much. I have a confusion in understanding whether verb-ed is acting as verb or modifier in an sentence.
If i want to check it, can i do this -> if i think its a verb, check who / what performs the action. if i am not finding answer to it, it is more likely to be a noun modifier
in this example if i assume expected to be a verb and ask who expected? it points to california, california can not expect anything. [so expected is not acting as verb]
is my approach right?
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New post 28 Dec 2017, 01:27
Avinash_R1 wrote:


Thanks very much. I have a confusion in understanding whether verb-ed is acting as verb or modifier in an sentence.
If i want to check it, can i do this -> if i think its a verb, check who / what performs the action. if i am not finding answer to it, it is more likely to be a noun modifier
in this example if i assume expected to be a verb and ask who expected? it points to california, california can not expect anything. [so expected is not acting as verb]
is my approach right?




Hello Avinash_R1,


Yes, your approach is correct. Well done. :thumbup:


You can also review our very popular article named ED FORMS - Verbs or Modifiers on the same topic for more details and examples by clicking on the following link:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/ed-forms-verbs-or-modifiers-134691.html



Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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New post 07 Feb 2018, 21:05
Hi RonPurewal , answer A has with + clause, is it OK? I thought that usage of with is unacceptable?
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New post 08 Feb 2018, 12:37
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ng.phg.mai wrote:
Hi RonPurewal , answer A has with + clause, is it OK? I thought that usage of with is unacceptable?

Dear ng.phg.mai,

Although I'm not the genius Mr. Ron Purewal, I'm happy to respond. :-)

This is a blog articles that provides some context on this subtle rule:
with + [noun] + [participle] on GMAT Sentence Correction
If you understand the two cases discussed in that article, you see that this particular question is a little different, primarily because the participle used is not the present active participle (e.g. "expecting") but the past passive participle ("expected").

When we have the structure "with" + [noun] + [present participle], there's the possibility that this could fall into Case I in that article, action by a different actor, and that always requires a full bonafide subordinate clause.

Instead, when we have "with" + [noun] + [past participle], especially with a "mental verb" such as "to expect," there's not really an action happening. It's more a background condition, and this is much closer to Case II described in that article.

With Mike going to the store to buy tomatoes, Chris planned to make a salad.
That has the present participle, which is always active. This describes a full action by an actor, different from the action & actor of the main clause. This is the forbidden case. If you want to talk about an action, don't try to cram that into a measly preposition phrase--a full action deserves a full verb, and therefore we need a full clause for this action.

With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer, the administration has grown . . .
This has the past participle, which is always passive. There's not really an "action" being done in the first part of the sentence--it's more a background condition, a static state of affairs which provides context for the action of the main clause. There's no sense of a "competition" between two different actions, as there is in the previous example.

My friend, if you think about grammar and grammar rules purely mechanically, the GMAT SC will punish you. You always have to think about meaning. The primary purpose of human language is to convey meaning, and all grammar exists purely to support the communication of meaning.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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New post 09 Feb 2018, 08:26
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ng.phg.mai wrote:
Hi RonPurewal , answer A has with + clause, is it OK? I thought that usage of with is unacceptable?


^^ Nope, not a whole clause.

The issue here is that you're mistakenly processing "expected" — which is a modifier here — as a verb.

As is so often the case, you MUST establish the INTENDED MEANING of the sentence BEFORE trying to process its grammar!
This sentence is NOT saying that "California expected to see" something. In other words, the sentence is not intended to say that California itself had "expectations"; that interpretation would be nonsense, since the state of California itself does not have a single sentient mind.
Rather, the intended meaning is that California WAS expected to see something. "Expected" is therefore a modifier here.
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New post 09 Feb 2018, 08:27
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Analogy:

With California driven to the brink of bankruptcy by its overly generous government spending, ...

This ^^ could be the beginning of another sentence, with grammar analogous to that of the sentence here.
Note that "driven..." is a MODIFIER. If this were a past-tense verb, it would be "drove".

Do you see the problem?
You're processing THIS sentence under the (mistaken) assumption that "expected" is grammatically analogous to "drove" (a past-tense verb), when in fact it's analogous to "driven" (a modifier).
You just have to be more careful here, because the past-tense verb and the modifier forms of "expected" are written the same way; they don't have two distinct forms, like "drove" and "driven".
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New post 21 Jul 2018, 05:01
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B, C & E is out just by seeing the "as much as 30 days" since much is for uncountable nouns.

I wasnt too comfortable with A but D is way off. So A it is.

Good Question!
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New post 04 May 2019, 16:45
Michael KC Chen wrote:
With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about public health and safety there.


(A) With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as many as 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about

(B) With California expecting to see severe electricity shortfalls this summer, and there will possibly be blackouts for as much as 30 days, the administration's concern has grown increasingly about

(C) As California is expected to be seeing severe electricity shortfalls and perhaps blackouts on as much as 30 days this summer, the administration's concern is increasing for

(D) Insofar as California is expected to see severe electricity shortfalls this summer, and there will possibly be blackouts as many as 30 days, the administration has increasing concern about

(E) Insofar as California expects to see severe electricity shortfalls and the possibility of blackouts for 30 days this summer, the administration has grown increasingly concerned about


2/2/1 split..
I was thinking that the use of ''grown & increasingly'' is redundant....crossed A out ...and marked D.
Looks like the usage of idiom ''insofar as'' is not correct in D ?


30 days " ....So we should use "as many as ". Days" are countable nouns and so we should use "many".

Option B and C gone.

"Insofar " means "to the extent " . For example :- I will complete my homework insofar as I can.

Replace "insofar" with "to the extent" in option D and E. It does not fit in . Option D and E are gone.

Option A is the best.

Please give me kudo s if you liked my explanation.
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New post 06 May 2019, 08:44
B and C wrong because much is used for uncountable things. Many is what we need to use for countable things.

B and E are wrong because California is doing the expecting. Wrong. The best version of this sentence would have experts expecting or something, but California definitely can’t expect something.

D is just a jumbled mess.

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New post 09 May 2019, 12:24
Brilliant question.. A it is !!

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New post 12 Jun 2019, 22:28
I am not clear on why 'A' is correct. I thought "growing" and "increasing" are redundant. Moreover, I would prefer "blackouts for 30 days" rather than "blackouts on 30 days". Am I wrong? Can someone please explain
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Re: With California expected to see severe electricity shortfalls and perh   [#permalink] 12 Jun 2019, 22:28

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