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Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal idea of the

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Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal idea of the  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2009, 21:52
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19
Question 1
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A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

53% (02:16) correct 47% (02:30) wrong based on 821

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Question 2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Question Stats:

64% (00:17) correct 36% (00:35) wrong based on 780

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Question 3
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B
C
D
E

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41% (00:34) correct 59% (00:36) wrong based on 771

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Question 4
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C
D
E

Question Stats:

47% (00:26) correct 53% (00:35) wrong based on 744

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C
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E

Question Stats:

47% (00:38) correct 53% (00:43) wrong based on 695

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C
D
E

Question Stats:

52% (00:26) correct 48% (00:28) wrong based on 663

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Question 7
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34% (00:31) correct 66% (00:27) wrong based on 665

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48% (00:27) correct 52% (00:24) wrong based on 611

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D
E

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50% (00:41) correct 50% (01:23) wrong based on 636

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Part of New RC Series- Please check this link for more questions


Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal idea of the economic market when he said that the free enterprise system is the most efficient economic system. Maximum freedom means maximum productiveness; our “openness” is to be the measure of our stability. Fascination with this ideal has made Americans defy the “Old World” categories of settled possessiveness versus unsettling deprivation, the cupidity of retention versus the cupidity of seizure, a “status quo” defended or attacked. The United States, it was believed, had no status quo ante. Our only “station” was the turning of a stationary wheel, spinning faster and faster. We did not base our system on property but opportunity—which meant we based it not on stability but on mobility. The more things changed, that is, the more rapidly the wheel turned, the steadier we would be. The conventional picture of class politics is composed of the Haves, who want a stability to keep what they have, and the Have-Nots, who want a touch of instability and change in which to scramble for the things they have not. But Americans imagined a condition in which speculators, self-makers, runners are always using the new opportunities given by our land. These economic leaders (front-runners) would thus be mainly agents of change. The nonstarters were considered the ones who wanted stability, a strong referee to give them some position in the race, a regulative hand to calm manic speculation; an authority that can call things to a halt, begin things again from compensatorily staggered “starting lines.”

“Reform” in America has been sterile because it can imagine no change except through the extension of this metaphor of a race, wider inclusion of competitors, “a piece of the action,” as it were, for the disenfranchised. There is no attempt to call off the race. Since our only stability is change, America seems not to honor the quiet work that achieves social interdependence and stability. There is, in our legends, no heroism of the office clerk, no stable industrial work force of the people who actually make the system work. There is no pride in being an employee (Wilson asked for a return to the time when everyone was an employer). There has been no boasting about our social workers—they are merely signs of the system’s failure, of opportunity denied or not taken, of things to be eliminated. We have no pride in our growing interdependence, in the fact that our system can serve others, that we are able to help those in need; empty boasts from the past make us ashamed of our present achievements, make us try to forget or deny them, move away from them. There is no honor but in the Wonderland race we must all run, all trying to win, none winning in the end (for there is no end).
1. The primary purpose of the passage is to
(A) criticize the inflexibility of American economic mythology
(B) contrast “Old World” and “New World” economic ideologies
(C) challenge the integrity of traditional political leaders
(D) champion those Americans whom the author deems to be neglected
(E) suggest a substitute for the traditional metaphor of a race



2. According to the passage, “Old World” values were based on
(A) ability
(B) property
(C) family connections
(D) guild hierarchies
(E) education



3. In the context of the author’s discussion of regulating change, which of the following could be most probably regarded as a “strong referee” (line 30) in the United States?
(A) A school principal
(B) A political theorist
(C) A federal court judge
(D) A social worker
(E) A government inspector



4. The author sets off the word “Reform” (line 35) with quotation marks in order to
(A) emphasize its departure from the concept of settled possessiveness
(B) show his support for a systematic program of change
(C) underscore the flexibility and even amorphousness of United States society
(D) indicate that the term was one of Wilson’s favorites
(E) assert that reform in the United States has not been fundamental



5. It can be inferred from the passage that the author most probably thinks that giving the disenfranchised “a piece of the action” (line 38) is
(A) a compassionate, if misdirected, legislative measure
(B) an example of Americans’ resistance to profound social change
(C) an innovative program for genuine social reform
(D) a monument to the efforts of industrial reformers
(E) a surprisingly “Old World” remedy for social ills



6. Which of the following metaphors could the author most appropriately use to summarize his own assessment of the American economic system (lines 35-60)?
(A) A windmill
(B) A waterfall
(C) A treadmill
(D) A gyroscope
(E) A bellows



7. It can be inferred from the passage that Woodrow Wilson’s ideas about the economic market
(A) encouraged those who “make the system work” (lines 45-46)
(B) perpetuated traditional legends about America
(C) revealed the prejudices of a man born wealthy
(D) foreshadowed the stock market crash of 1929
(E) began a tradition of presidential proclamations on economics



8. The passage contains information that would answer which of the following questions?
I. What techniques have industrialists used to manipulate a free market?
II. In what ways are “New World” and “Old World” economic policies similar?
III. Has economic policy in the United States tended to reward independent action?
(A) I only
(B) II only
(C) III only
(D) I and II only
(E) II and III only



9. Which of the following best expresses the author’s main point?
(A) Americans’ pride in their jobs continues to give them stamina today.
(B) The absence of a status quo ante has undermined United States economic structure.
(C) The free enterprise system has been only a useless concept in the United States.
(D) The myth of the American free enterprise system is seriously flawed.
(E) Fascination with the ideal of “openness” has made Americans a progressive people.



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New post 06 Apr 2009, 22:27
1
I am happy to be back :)
will now emphasize more on the Quality rather than Quantity side of RCs
Few(may be 2/day) Good Quality RCs and Good discussions are what we need

My take is DBDA BCACD(I did badly -I know it)

Btw,whats difference between "primary purpose" and "main point"?
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New post 07 Apr 2009, 17:53
I will post my answers later tonight and I am glad you are back.

I was finding it really hard to manage your duties here. Finally, I will get much needed break.


Difference between Primary purpose and Main point is same as difference between Primary purpose and Main idea i.e.

Primary purpose of message says why author has written the passage.
The answers will start with "To..." most of the times. And try identifying what kind of passage it is: explanatory, comparative or argumentative to know whether the author's primary purpose is to "outline", "evaluate", "compare", etc. while main point is superset of 2-3 option.
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New post 08 Apr 2009, 09:43
No sarcasm at all,Icandy
you are the Guru in RC.
I am just learning the tricks

Are you asking abt this one?which I got right too

6. Which of the following metaphors could the author most appropriately use to summarize his own assessment of the American economic system (lines 35-60)?

(A) A windmill
(B) A waterfall
(C) A treadmill
(D) A gyroscope
(E) A bellows


I opted for treadmill because "its in continuously running" mode resembling "American economic system "
check the last line--#60
"There is no honor but in the Wonderland race we must all run, all trying to win, none winning in the end (for there is no end)."
sent PM to you,pls check,icandy
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New post 08 Apr 2009, 10:54
nitya34 wrote:
No sarcasm at all,Icandy
you are the Guru in RC.
I am just learning the tricks

Are you asking abt this one?which I got right too

6. Which of the following metaphors could the author most appropriately use to summarize his own assessment of the American economic system (lines 35-60)?

(A) A windmill
(B) A waterfall
(C) A treadmill
(D) A gyroscope
(E) A bellows


I opted for treadmill because "its in continuously running" mode resembling "American economic system "
check the last line--#60
"There is no honor but in the Wonderland race we must all run, all trying to win, none winning in the end (for there is no end)."
sent PM to you,pls check,icandy


I agree with what you are saying but I dont understand how it is treadmill unless "running" is the analogy here. I drew similarity on the continuously running piece. Can a treadmill be stopped? ofcourse yes, then how is it running all the time. The only thing that came close to me was the waterfall.
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New post 08 Apr 2009, 22:14
After a while I felt that I have no clue what passage was saying and really struggled to get grasp of it.
Got 4, 7 and 9 wrong.

I feel treadmill is the correct choice as it is referring to something continuous, of course windmill is there but when author says none winning in the end treadmill takes an edge. As far as waterfall is concerned it is top to bottom and in my opinion does not reflect what author is trying to say.
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New post 17 Aug 2009, 09:04
I got
ABAECCACD
Off on 3, 5 and 7
3 -> Why not the principal?
A strong referee to give them some position in the race, a regulative hand to calm manic speculation; an authority that can call things to a halt, begin things again from compensatorily staggered “starting lines.” - cant a principal be that? May be judge is the better answer.

5 -> no change except through the extension of this metaphor of a race, wider inclusion of competitors, “a piece of the action,” as it were, for the disenfranchised. -> doesnt this mean that Americans value this? OA say "an example of Americans’ resistance to profound social change", am not able to deduce why??

7- >
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New post 29 Aug 2009, 08:34
Hi... I am late too... but better late than never....
my answers:
BBCABCACE
i seek someone's intervention to help me correct my logic on arriving at the right answer:

1. B--X--- A is correct: As a thumb rule, the answer choices that swing towards one extreme should be avoided... the 1st answer choice uses 3 terms that suggest extremity-- critisize, inflexibility, economic mythology... B looks like the second best..
4. A---X---E : I could not catch the essence of the question... pls help.
6. D--X---C : Previous posts have justified treadmill... but i think... challenging every traditional value system deprives the society of its axis.. and therefore a gyroscope which has a changing axis would be a good choice...
7. A---X--B : God knows what ws i thinking that i marked A. Though B dsnt look too promising either.
9. E---X--D : The same logic as the first question. One thing tht makes E a lesser likely choice is that.. no where in passage does the author mentions that he has any such opinion that Americans are progressive. For Indian applicants like me.. Americans being progressive is too much a discussed topic that we are adding personal baised to this ans choice :lol:
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New post 18 Feb 2010, 17:58
Dude no point if you dont intend to put the OAs here

Here are my answers. Some points as I found my choices different than the posters above (Janani: u have posted only 8 answers)

1 A
2 B
3 E
4 B - E sounded like a better choice on review ( word sterile goes better with fundamental than with systematic)
5 B
6 C - treadmill as you keep running on it without an end and without going anywhere
7 B
8 B
9 D - I will pick "Seriously flawed" over "useless concept" which sounded too strong.
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New post 19 Jan 2011, 16:42
1
sacmanitin wrote:
Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal idea of the economic market when he said that the free enterprise system is the most efficient economic system. Maximum freedom means maximum productiveness; our “openness” is to be the measure of our stability. Fascination with this ideal has made Americans defy the “Old World” categories of settled possessiveness versus unsettling deprivation, the cupidity of retention versus the cupidity of seizure, a “status quo” defended or attacked. The United States, it was believed, had no status quo ante. Our only “station” was the turning of a stationary wheel, spinning faster and faster. We did not base our system on property but opportunity—which meant we based it not on stability but on mobility. The more things changed, that is, the more rapidly the wheel turned, the steadier we would be. The conventional picture of class politics is composed of the Haves, who want a stability to keep what they have, and the Have-Nots, who want a touch of instability and change in which to scramble for the things they have not. But Americans imagined a condition in which speculators, self-makers, runners are always using the new opportunities given by our land. These economic leaders (front-runners) would thus be mainly agents of change. The nonstarters were considered the ones who wanted stability, a strong referee to give them some position in the race, a regulative hand to calm manic speculation; an authority that can call things to a halt, begin things again from compensatorily staggered “starting lines.”
“Reform” in America has been sterile because it can imagine no change except through the extension of this metaphor of a race, wider inclusion of competitors, “a piece of the action,” as it were, for the disenfranchised. There is no attempt to call off the race. Since our only stability is change, America seems not to honor the quiet work that achieves social interdependence and stability. There is, in our legends, no heroism of the office clerk, no stable industrial work force of the people who actually make the system work. There is no pride in being an employee (Wilson asked for a return to the time when everyone was an employer). There has been no boasting about our social workers—they are merely signs of the system’s failure, of opportunity denied or not taken, of things to be eliminated. We have no pride in our growing interdependence, in the fact that our system can serve others, that we are able to help those in need; empty boasts from the past make us ashamed of our present achievements, make us try to forget or deny them, move away from them. There is no honor but in the Wonderland race we must all run, all trying to win, none winning in the end (for there is no end).
1. The primary purpose of the passage is to
(A) criticize the inflexibility of American economic mythology
(B) contrast “Old World” and “New World” economic ideologies
(C) challenge the integrity of traditional political leaders
(D) champion those Americans whom the author deems to be neglected
(E) suggest a substitute for the traditional metaphor of a race
2. According to the passage, “Old World” values were based on
(A) ability
(B) property
(C) family connections
(D) guild hierarchies
(E) education
3. In the context of the author’s discussion of regulating change, which of the following could be most probably regarded as a “strong referee” (line 30) in the United States?
(A) A school principal
(B) A political theorist
(C) A federal court judge
(D) A social worker
(E) A government inspector
4. The author sets off the word “Reform” (line 35) with quotation marks in order to
(A) emphasize its departure from the concept of settled possessiveness
(B) show his support for a systematic program of change
(C) underscore the flexibility and even amorphousness of United States society
(D) indicate that the term was one of Wilson’s favorites
(E) assert that reform in the United States has not been fundamental
5. It can be inferred from the passage that the author most probably thinks that giving the disenfranchised “a piece of the action” (line 38) is
(A) a compassionate, if misdirected, legislative measure
(B) an example of Americans’ resistance to profound social change
(C) an innovative program for genuine social reform
(D) a monument to the efforts of industrial reformers
(E) a surprisingly “Old World” remedy for social ills
6. Which of the following metaphors could the author most appropriately use to summarize his own assessment of the American economic system (lines 35-60)?
(A) A windmill
(B) A waterfall
(C) A treadmill
(D) A gyroscope
(E) A bellows
7. It can be inferred from the passage that Woodrow Wilson’s ideas about the economic market
(A) encouraged those who “make the system work” (lines 45-46)
(B) perpetuated traditional legends about America
(C) revealed the prejudices of a man born wealthy
(D) foreshadowed the stock market crash of 1929
(E) began a tradition of presidential proclamations on economics
8. The passage contains information that would answer which of the following questions?
I. What techniques have industrialists used to manipulate a free market?
II. In what ways are “New World” and “Old World” economic policies similar?
III. Has economic policy in the United States tended to reward independent action?
(A) I only
(B) II only
(C) III only
(D) I and II only
(E) II and III only
9. Which of the following best expresses the author’s main point?
(A) Americans’ pride in their jobs continues to give them stamina today.
(B) The absence of a status quo ante has undermined United States economic structure.
(C) The free enterprise system has been only a useless concept in the United States.
(D) The myth of the American free enterprise system is seriously flawed.
(E) Fascination with the ideal of “openness” has made Americans a progressive people.


please help me with the explanations for Question 2 ,3 ,6,7 ,8.


2 - “Old World” categories of settled possessiveness versus unsettling deprivation, the cupidity of retention versus the cupidity of seizure, a “status quo” defended or attacked - hence property

3 - a strong referee to give them some position in the race, a regulative hand to calm manic speculation; an authority that can call things to a halt, begin things again from compensatorily staggered “starting lines.” - hence a judge

6 - see the answer of nytia34

7 - if the main point of the passage is "criticize the inflexibility of American economic mythology" hence we still believe in "traditional legends about America" the myth resist to date

8 - only the third we find it in the passage

hope this help you ;)
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New post 03 Jun 2011, 05:05
i got 7/9 correct. i made an error in q 6 , because i did not understand why it can not be a windmill and why is it a waterfall.

i got q 9 wrong under acute time pressure. had to choose between B and D and chose B under time pressure.
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New post 08 Nov 2011, 11:01
2
Jesus..Christ! What the hell was that passage? Reads like it just landed on earth from some alien mothership..

1 - right
2 - right
3 - wrong (picked B..the whole question sounded to me like "if a+b=2, then what's the color of a two-legged elephant" :P )
4 - right
5 - wrong (picked A)
6 - right (treadmill is the only word I've ever read in an economic context, so..(un)educated guess)
7 - right (although I didn't even know what "perpetuated" means...the other choices sounded even more stupid, tho.)
8 - right
9 - wrong (picked B)

I'm VERY surprised I had so many correct answers but I guarantee that was pure luck. I barely understood anything in there, I was guessing every single question...

I particularly dont understand the following:
"The nonstarters were considered the ones who wanted stability, a strong referee to give them some position in the race, a regulative hand to calm manic speculation; an authority that can call things to a halt, begin things again from compensatorily staggered “starting lines.”"

in how far is the "strong referee" related to the nonstarters? does he need to give them "some position in the race"? why would he have to regulate "manic speculation", doesnt sound like something "nonstarters" would do?!
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New post 20 Jul 2012, 08:28
2
Hi ppl i am new to gmatclub,

Could someone please explain the answer for 7th Q.

i completed the passage in 15.xx mins. Tough one but nice to solve such a passage. My answers:

1. A. bcoz the author criticizes the american economic system throughout the 2nd para. phrases like "our empty boasts from the past" point to the myths of american economic ideology.

2. B. easy one.

3. B. The answer is C. Got this wrong but understood why i was wrong. words like "regulative hand" "an authority who can halt things" all point to a judge :)

4. E. the author uses the word sterile to assert that all social changes have been very superficial and no fundamental change has taken place.

5. B. The act of giving a piece of the action symbolizes that the system is not ready for a fundamental change and rather it wants to keep things as it is by giving the have nots a small piece of the pie and keeping them satisfied. using POE too only B looks good. :)

6. C. easy one.

7 .A. the answer is B. Got this one wrong could someone explain this to me. :(

8. C. 1. no techniques are discussed anywhere in the passage. 2. old world is only mentioned in the 1st few lines of the 1st para after that nothing about its similarities or differences are discussed. 3. A firm YES

9.D. easy one.
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New post 12 Jan 2014, 09:32
I literally understood very little of what was written in the passage.
I attempted this passage in 21 minutes and I was expecting that I might get 1 or 2 correct because the RC didn't go well.
But, to my surprise when I checked the answers I got the first 7 correct and last 2 incorrect.

My answers are: A,B,C,E,B,C,B,E,B
Total Time: 21 minutes
Accuracy: 7/9 (77%)
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New post 05 Feb 2014, 23:27
sahilchaudhary wrote:
I literally understood very little of what was written in the passage.
I attempted this passage in 21 minutes and I was expecting that I might get 1 or 2 correct because the RC didn't go well.
But, to my surprise when I checked the answers I got the first 7 correct and last 2 incorrect.

My answers are: A,B,C,E,B,C,B,E,B
Total Time: 21 minutes
Accuracy: 7/9 (77%)



Hi
What you think that happened to me. I got "ONLY" 2 correct ,though thought it would have been 4 or 5.
Extremely disappointed..... :oops:

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New post 07 Jul 2014, 06:13
Criticizes how America focuses not enough on interdependence and too much on competition. (2nd para)

So answer of 1st question is A.
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New post 05 Oct 2014, 04:49
1-> A: I used POE here. None of the other options sounded right. All the other options were either partially or completely out of scope.
2-> B: None of the answers looked right to me. I chose property because it was the only one which looked as possible answer. "settled possessiveness" -> seems like something that talks about settling -> hence property.
3-> C: Since only a judge can act as a strong referee for the country.
4-> E: POE
5-> B:POE
6-> C: Its the only option that talks about movement and something that can be halted. Similar to the US economic system which is always on the move but can be brought to a halt if required, a treadmill keeps moving and is also something that can stop.
7-> B: POE. All others are OOS.
8 ->C: 1st 2 statements arent spoken about at all.
9-> D: A-> OOS. B-> Undermining of the US economic structure isnt spoken about in the passage. Not sure about C. E is absolutely not right according to the passage.
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New post 12 Apr 2017, 12:04
In question 2, could you please explain how "property" can be the answer, from which sentences, we can conclude this.

For question 4, could you please explain the meaning of first few lines of second para as in first line of it, it has been written as " reform has left america sterile" but after few lines, it has been mentioned as " america seems not to honor the stability".so got confused between positive and negative trend, what to choose and how to choose?
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Re: Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal idea of the  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2017, 12:38
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VKat wrote:
In question 2, could you please explain how "property" can be the answer, from which sentences, we can conclude this.

For question 4, could you please explain the meaning of first few lines of second para as in first line of it, it has been written as " reform has left america sterile" but after few lines, it has been mentioned as " america seems not to honor the stability".so got confused between positive and negative trend, what to choose and how to choose?


Fascination with this ideal has made Americans defy the “Old World” categories of settled possessiveness versus unsettling deprivation, the cupidity of retention versus the cupidity of seizure, a “status quo” defended or attacked. The United States, it was believed, had no status quo ante. Our only “station” was the turning of a stationary wheel, spinning faster and faster. We did not base our system on property but opportunity

The above answers your query about 2nd question - as far as 4th question is concerned even am in doubt. I got it wrong.
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Re: Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal idea of the  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Apr 2017, 22:35
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VKat

Quote:
For question 4, could you please explain the meaning of first few lines of second para as in first line of it, it has been written as " reform has left america sterile" but after few lines, it has been mentioned as " america seems not to honor the stability".so got confused between positive and negative trend, what to choose and how to choose?


The author is trying to say that reform in America has been sterile (ie unproductive) because there was never any attempt to change the fundamental system that had taken hold in America, a system that the author compares to a race. There may have been attempts to modify or improve the rules of the race, but there was never an "attempt to call off the race" entirely. In other words, changing the rules of the race (ie modifying the existing system) would not result in significant change or reform; in order to achieve real, substantial change, there would have to be an attempt to call off the race (ie embrace an entirely different system). The latter would constitute "fundamental" reform, whereas the former constitutes only superficial reform; thus, "reform" is placed in quotes to assert that the changes to the rules of the race have resulted in superficial reform but not fundamental reform.
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Re: Woodrow Wilson was referring to the liberal idea of the &nbs [#permalink] 15 Apr 2017, 22:35

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