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A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies

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A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 17 Dec 2018, 04:53
15
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A
B
C
D
E

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A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies by the Greek playwright Euripides. Of these, ten called the “select plays,” are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also appear in other medieval manuscripts; this group includes some of Euripides’ best-known works, including the Medea. The other eight, which appear only in L, are called "alphabeticals", because they appear in alphabetical order, without commentary. The Electra is one of the alphabetical.

Which of the following can be reliably concluded on the basis of the statements given?


A. Only Euripides’ best-known works are accompanied by ancient commentaries in extant medieval manuscripts.

B. The select plays are accompanied by ancient commentaries because they were the best known of Euripides’ works.

C. No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in ancient times.

D. Euripides’s Medea never appears in medieval manuscripts unaccompanied by ancient commentary.

E. Euripides’ Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary in any extant medieval manuscript.


Attachment:
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Originally posted by goalsnr on 03 Jul 2008, 22:06.
Last edited by Bunuel on 17 Dec 2018, 04:53, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2008, 12:09
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rpmodi wrote:
A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies
by the Greek playwright Euripides. Of these, ten called the “select
plays,” are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also
appear in other medieval manuscripts; this group includes some of
Euripides’ best-known works, including the Medea. The other eight,
which appear in alphabetical order, without commentary. The Electra is
one of the alphabeticals.

Which of the following can be reliably concluded on the basis of the
Statements given?

A. Only Euripides’ best-known works are accompanied by ancient
commentaries in extant medieval manuscripts.

B. The select plays are accompanied by ancient commentaries
because they were the best known of Euripides’ works.

C. No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in
ancient times.

D. Euripides’ Medea never appears in medieval manuscripts
unaccompanied by ancient commentary.

E. Euripides’ Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary
in any extant medieval manuscript.


First, there's nothing to suggest that the 'alphabeticals' do not also include some of Euripedes' best-known works. For all we know from the question, Electra might be the best known of Euripedes' plays. The 'select plays' only include "some of Euripides’ best-known works". A and B are out.

We only know that the 'select plays' have commentaries in manuscript L, so D is out.

C is a much stronger version of E. If C were true, E would be true as well, and the question cannot have two different answers which are both correct. By elimination, E ought to be correct.

Still, there's a logical flaw with this answer. The question tells us that the 'select plays' "are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also appear in other medieval manuscripts". The intended implication is that the alphabeticals, including Electra, neither have commentary in L, nor appear in other manuscripts- and thus do not appear with commentary in any manuscript. Logically, that's problematic. The 'select plays' are defined by two conditions: they appear in other manuscripts and have commentary in L. The 'alphabeticals' logically cannot satisfy both of these conditions; otherwise we'd call them 'select plays'. This does not mean that the alphabeticals do not satisfy one or the other of the two conditions. We know they do not have commentary in L, but that does not prevent them from appearing in other manuscripts, and perhaps having commentary in other manuscripts.

Either the question-designer messed this one up, or there was something in the original wording to better convey the intended meaning of the question. I would want to see the original wording here; "The other eight, which appear in alphabetical order, without commentary." is not a sentence.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2014, 10:46
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L - Medieval manuscript - L contains 18 extant tragedies.
10 -> have ancient commentaries in L and they appear in other medieval manuscripts -> one of them is Medea.
Other 8 -> Doesn't contain any ancient commentary in L and also doesn't appear in other medieval manuscripts.-> One of them is Electra.

A. Only Euripides’ best-known works are accompanied by ancient commentaries in extant medieval manuscripts - Cannot be inferred as best known work can be in other 8.
B. The select plays are accompanied by ancient commentaries because they were the best known of Euripides’ works - Cannot be inferred as nothing is said why they are called "select plays"
C. No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in ancient times - Cannot be inferred as Electra is not found in other medieval manuscripts. There might be commentaries written else where and not found yet. No is a strong word here.
D. Euripides’ Medea never appears in medieval manuscripts unaccompanied by ancient commentary - Medea has ancient commentary in L. The passage doesn't say about other medieval manuscripts
E. Euripides’ Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary in any extant medieval manuscript. - Can be inferred as Electra is not even mentioned in other ancient manuscripts.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2008, 12:33
1
1
IanStewart wrote:
rpmodi wrote:
A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies
by the Greek playwright Euripides. Of these, ten called the “select
plays,” are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also
appear in other medieval manuscripts; this group includes some of
Euripides’ best-known works, including the Medea. The other eight,
which appear in alphabetical order, without commentary. The Electra is
one of the alphabeticals.

Which of the following can be reliably concluded on the basis of the
Statements given?

A. Only Euripides’ best-known works are accompanied by ancient
commentaries in extant medieval manuscripts.

B. The select plays are accompanied by ancient commentaries
because they were the best known of Euripides’ works.

C. No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in
ancient times.

D. Euripides’ Medea never appears in medieval manuscripts
unaccompanied by ancient commentary.

E. Euripides’ Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary
in any extant medieval manuscript.


First, there's nothing to suggest that the 'alphabeticals' do not also include some of Euripedes' best-known works. For all we know from the question, Electra might be the best known of Euripedes' plays. The 'select plays' only include "some of Euripides’ best-known works". A and B are out.

We only know that the 'select plays' have commentaries in manuscript L, so D is out.

C is a much stronger version of E. If C were true, E would be true as well, and the question cannot have two different answers which are both correct. By elimination, E ought to be correct.

Still, there's a logical flaw with this answer. The question tells us that the 'select plays' "are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also appear in other medieval manuscripts". The intended implication is that the alphabeticals, including Electra, neither have commentary in L, nor appear in other manuscripts- and thus do not appear with commentary in any manuscript. Logically, that's problematic. The 'select plays' are defined by two conditions: they appear in other manuscripts and have commentary in L. The 'alphabeticals' logically cannot satisfy both of these conditions; otherwise we'd call them 'select plays'. This does not mean that the alphabeticals do not satisfy one or the other of the two conditions. We know they do not have commentary in L, but that does not prevent them from appearing in other manuscripts, and perhaps having commentary in other manuscripts.

Either the question-designer messed this one up, or there was something in the original wording to better convey the intended meaning of the question. I would want to see the original wording here; "The other eight, which appear in alphabetical order, without commentary." is not a sentence.


No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in
ancient times


>>>>We cannot conclude that No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in
ancient times. The author is discussing only the L manuscript. In L the Electra doesnot have commentary. But we cannot conclude that other manuscripts will not have Electra with commnetaries
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2008, 15:09
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I feel it should be E

Here's why....

A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies
by the Greek playwright Euripides. Of these, ten called the “select
plays,” are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also
appear in other medieval manuscripts; this group includes some of
Euripides’ best-known works, including the Medea. The other eight,
which appear in alphabetical order, without commentary. The Electra is
one of the alphabeticals.

Which of the following can be reliably concluded on the basis of the
Statements given?

A. Only Euripides’ best-known works are accompanied by ancient
commentaries in extant medieval manuscripts.

Too extreme
B. The select plays are accompanied by ancient commentaries
because they were the best known of Euripides’ works.

The people who wrote the commentaries at that point in time could or could not have possibly known which were the best known of Euripides’ works. Its not safe to conclude that they did.....
C. No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in
ancient times.

Too extreme
D. Euripides’ Medea never appears in medieval manuscripts
unaccompanied by ancient commentary.

The plural medieval manuscripts is what makes this option wrong. Okay we have L where it is always accompanied by ancient commentary. What about Y and Z, do we know anything about them??....hmmm no
E. Euripides’ Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary
in any extant medieval manuscript.

This is correct as it refers to particular manuscript in question and will always be true with respect to this manuscript (ie L)
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2008, 17:19
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I was between C & E

The distinction between C & E is scope. C expands it to ancient times, which is out of the scope of the argument.

B is wrong because stimulus clearly says some best known works and not all

A is wrong because it reverses what stimulus establishes. stimulus says works with commentaries have some best known works. A says best known works all have commentary

D again is too strong. we only know that Medea appears with Commentary in L. We don't know about other manuscripts.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2008, 20:09
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Is there something missing from the stimulus? The second last sentence is only a sentence fragment, and NONE of the answer choices follows reliably (i.e., necessarily) from the stimulus.

A: Not necessarily true. The stimulus tells us that the select plays (which include SOME of E's best known works) are accompanied by ancient commentaries in L. It tells us nothing about what is or is not accompanied by commentaries in other manuscripts. Not only that, but it leaves open the possibility that some of the "select plays" are NOT among E's best known works, in which case A would be false.

B: There is no information at all indicating WHY the select plays were accompanied by commentaries in L, or anywhere else -- IF they were so accompanied in other manuscripts.

C: The stimulus shows that there are no commentaries about Elektra in L. This does not tell us anything about whether there are or are not commentaries about Elektra in any other mediaeval manuscripts. Even if there were not, it would still be possible that there were ancient commentaries written about Elektra which did NOT happen to be captured in any of the mediaeval manuscripts which have survived.

D: The stimulus shows that Medea is accompanied by commentary in L. This does NOT prove that every other mediaeval manuscript which contains Medea also contains an ancient commentary about Medea.

E: Partly the same analysis as C: The stimulus shows that there are no commentaries about Elektra in L. This does NOT prove that there are no commentaries about Elektra in any OTHER mediaeval manuscript.

Please check the original stimulus: If one of these answers follows logically, there must be more in it than has been posted.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2010, 22:52
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seofah wrote:
A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies
by the Greek playwright Euripides. Of these, ten called the “select
plays,” are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also
appear in other medieval manuscripts; this group includes some of
Euripides’ best-known works, including the Medea. The other eight,
which appear in alphabetical order, without commentary. The Electra is
one of the alphabeticals.
Which of the following can be reliably concluded on the basis of the
Statements given?
A. Only Euripides’ best-known works are accompanied by ancient
commentaries in extant medieval manuscripts. --> it is too self-assumed. The premise stated that there are Euripides' best known works that are accompanied by ancient commentaries BUT IT IS NOT NECESSARILY the "ONLY"one.
B. The select plays are accompanied by ancient commentaries
because they were the best known of Euripides’ works. --> the statement didnt say the best known of Euripides' works is the CAUSE of the select plays accompanied by ancient commentaries. (not causation)
C. No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in
ancient times. --> electra is one of the alphabetical but it does not necessarily mean that there is NO commentaries written about it.
D. Euripides’ Medea never appears in medieval manuscripts
unaccompanied by ancient commentary. --> again too conclusive, there might or might not be in other manuscript.
E. Euripides’ Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary
in any extant medieval manuscript. --> in these 18 extant medieval manuscript, E's Electra not accompanied by a commentary (correct)

My ans is E.
there are eighteen extant tragedies
- ten called the “select
plays,” are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also
appear in other medieval manuscripts; this group includes some of
Euripides’ best-known works, including the Medea.
- The other eight,which appear in alphabetical order, without commentary. The Electra is
one of the alphabeticals.

What is the OA?
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2012, 15:38
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So weird question... I don't agree with any of those answer choices.

a. We don't know and "only" is too extreme.

b. Some of the select plays are Euripides's best known work, so we cannot assume or say with the passage that the whole select plays are the best known work

c. Commentaries might have been written about Electra in ancient times since we cannot assume with the passage that Electra only appears in the medival manuscript called L and that also the L is the only extant medival manuscript.

d. We don't know "never" is too exterme.

e. We don't know anything about other extant medival manuscript.

"Now there is one little step. Notice how the "select plays" differ from "the alphabeticals" in that they are ALSO found in other medieval manuscripts. Therefore the "other eight" are not found in medieval manuscripts ------> Electra does not appear in other ancient manuscripts. The only manuscript it does appear in it is not accompanied by commentary. Thus (E)."

This is explanation of a GMAT instructor from another GMAT website.
I can't see how the bold part makes sense. The passage mentions that the select plays have commentary whereas other other eight don't, but the passage doesn't mention anything that implies the select plays are different from the other eight in that they also found in other medieval manuscripts.

I'd like to hear other people's opinions on this issue.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 17 May 2012, 21:40
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eybrj2 wrote:
So weird question... I don't agree with any of those answer choices.


"Now there is one little step. Notice how the "select plays" differ from "the alphabeticals" in that they are ALSO found in other medieval manuscripts. Therefore the "other eight" are not found in medieval manuscripts ------> Electra does not appear in other ancient manuscripts. The only manuscript it does appear in it is not accompanied by commentary. Thus (E)."

This is explanation of a GMAT instructor from another GMAT website.
I can't see how the bold part makes sense. The passage mentions that the select plays have commentary whereas other other eight don't, but the passage doesn't mention anything that implies the select plays are different from the other eight in that they also found in other medieval manuscripts.

I'd like to hear other people's opinions on this issue.



The statement *does* reference that those "select" plays also appear in other medieval manuscripts.

"Of these, ten called the “select plays,” are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also appear in other medieval manuscripts;"

So what it's saying here is that these 10 were so popular they were also captured in other manuscripts out there, not just this "L" one. This "L" happens to also include 8 additional "less known" plays. The "Electra" is a lesser known play and doesn't have commentary as is described since it is among the "8".

We know that the 10 were "also in other manuscripts" => kind of implying that the remaining 8 were not. The 8 did not have commentary and were not as known. Most likely they were not in other manuscripts. So (E) says that Electra does not appear with a commentary in ANY manuscript. Well the only one that it *appears* to be in does NOT have a commentary - so (E) seems to be a valid conclusion. Note (E) mentions the word "appear" so we don't know for sure but it's highly likely based on what we inferred - that it doesn't have commentary in ANY manuscript.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2014, 12:21
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OA is E.
Source: GMAT Prep EP

C is wrong cause it strongly says no commentaries were written at all. However, we are taking about only the extant manuscripts. It is possible that the commentaries were written, but somehow the manuscripts are lost or not found.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2016, 05:26
seofah wrote:
A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies
by the Greek playwright Euripides. Of these, ten called the “select
plays,” are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also
appear in other medieval manuscripts; this group includes some of
Euripides’ best-known works, including the Medea. The other eight,
which appear in alphabetical order, without commentary. The Electra is
one of the alphabeticals.
Which of the following can be reliably concluded on the basis of the
Statements given?
A. Only Euripides’ best-known works are accompanied by ancient
commentaries in extant medieval manuscripts.
B. The select plays are accompanied by ancient commentaries
because they were the best known of Euripides’ works.
C. No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in
ancient times.
D. Euripides’ Medea never appears in medieval manuscripts
unaccompanied by ancient commentary.
E. Euripides’ Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary
in any extant medieval manuscript.


The argument didn't talk about other extant medieval manuscripts.
We dont know if L is the only extant medieval manuscript or NOT.
Was this implied anywhere in the stimulus?
So how can we reliably conclude that Euripides' Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary
in any extant medieval manuscript
?

It is clear that Euripides' Electra has no commentary in manuscript L whcih is a medieval extant manuscript

Did the argument suggest anywhere that manuscript L is the only extant medieval manuscript?

I'll appreciate your appropriate responses with kudoses.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2016, 06:42
Nez wrote:
seofah wrote:
A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies
by the Greek playwright Euripides. Of these, ten called the “select
plays,” are accompanied in L by ancient commentaries and also
appear in other medieval manuscripts; this group includes some of
Euripides’ best-known works, including the Medea.The other eight,
which appear in alphabetical order, without commentary.
The Electra is
one of the alphabeticals.
Which of the following can be reliably concluded on the basis of the
Statements given?
A. Only Euripides’ best-known works are accompanied by ancient
commentaries in extant medieval manuscripts.
B. The select plays are accompanied by ancient commentaries
because they were the best known of Euripides’ works.
C. No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in
ancient times.
D. Euripides’ Medea never appears in medieval manuscripts
unaccompanied by ancient commentary.
E. Euripides’ Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary
in any extant medieval manuscript.


The argument didn't talk about other extant medieval manuscripts.
We dont know if L is the only extant medieval manuscript or NOT.
Was this implied anywhere in the stimulus?
So how can we reliably conclude that Euripides' Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary
in any extant medieval manuscript
?

It is clear that Euripides' Electra has no commentary in manuscript L whcih is a medieval extant manuscript

Did the argument suggest anywhere that manuscript L is the only extant medieval manuscript?

I'll appreciate your appropriate responses with kudoses.
hi great chetan2u.


Hi,
E cannot be the answer in the way the Q has been written..
the highlighted portion is not grammatically or logically correct, so I read the thread above..
It seems this has been reproduced with errors and misses out on an important aspect that can relate to correct choice..
please see the post above yours, which carries an image..
the correct Q is written there and the line is actually
" the other 8, which are only in L, are called alphabeticals, because they appear in alphabetical order , without commentary.

Yeah, it is surprising that many have found the answer to be E, without this vital information..

It is not a strengthener or weakener, where we can assume to reach OA as the one in CLIMATE Q of GMATPREP, we saw yesterday.
This is a conclusion Q and has to be only on what is given in the argument..
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Feb 2019, 11:43
This is a real brain twister. Can an expert please look into this? I answered C, my reasoning was that Electra was an alphabetical, and alphabeticals are written without commentary, thus no commentaries were written. I need help understanding this better.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Feb 2019, 12:17
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ramalcha wrote:
This is a real brain twister. Can an expert please look into this? I answered C, my reasoning was that Electra was an alphabetical, and alphabeticals are written without commentary, thus no commentaries were written. I need help understanding this better.

(C) is a trap answer, one such that we can fool ourselves into thinking that the passage supports it even though the passage does not really support it.

Here's what the passage says about Electra.

The other eight, which appear only in L, are called "alphabeticals", because they appear in alphabetical order, without commentary. The Electra is one of the alphabetical.

The passage does indicate the following:

- Electra appears only in L.

- No commentary appears in L with Electra.

So, we can get the impression that since Electra appears only in L and without commentary, no commentaries were written about Electra in ancient times.

But wait a minute. Couldn't commentaries about Electra have been written elsewhere, even if Electra itself did not appear elsewhere? Of course. Commentaries about Electra could have appeared in other manuscripts.

Here's (C).

C. No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in ancient times.

Since the passage tells us only that no commentaries about Electra appear in L but does not say that no commentaries about Electra appeared anywhere else, the passage does not support what (C) says.
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Re: A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2019, 21:50
Here is why E is the correct answer.

"The other eight, which appear only in L, [include Electra]". Electra only appears in L. In L it does not have a commentary. E.
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A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies  [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2019, 08:49
Tough question, got this one wrong due to carelessness. There's a lot of things going on here and I usually don't write anything down on verbal, although for this one I probably should have to keep the relationships straight.

What we know:
--- L has 10 well-known plays with comments, including Medea
--- L has 8 without comments. The 8 without only appear in L (Electra is one of them)
--- the 10 well-known plays also appear in other manuscripts

A. Only Euripides’ best-known works are accompanied by ancient commentaries in extant medieval manuscripts.
We don't know whether any other manuscripts besides L have commentary to being with. "Only" is an extreme word.

B. The select plays are accompanied by ancient commentaries because they were the best known of Euripides’ works.
We don't know if popularity was the driving force for the commentary. Maybe they just have the most relevant subject matter to the people commenting or something.

C. No commentaries were written about Euripides’ Electra in ancient times.
We don't know anything about commentaries other than that L has some. It's entirely plausible that some were written but are now lost. "No" is an extreme word.

D. Euripides’s Medea never appears in medieval manuscripts unaccompanied by ancient commentary.
As in C, we don't know anything about commentaries other than that L has some. "Never" is an extreme word.

E. Euripides’ Electra does not appear accompanied by a commentary in any extant medieval manuscript.
We know this because Electra ONLY appears in L, and is one of the 8 that does not have commentary.
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A medieval manuscript called L contains all eighteen extant tragedies   [#permalink] 25 May 2019, 08:49
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