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A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams,

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A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, with each of its L team leaders responsible for D group directors, and each of those D group directors responsible for F fundraisers. If the only three positions on each local team are team leaders, group directors, and fundraisers, and there are more group directors than team leaders, how many team leaders are on the Dallas team?

(1) There are 81 total members on the Dallas team

(2) There are 5 group directors on the Dallas team
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2013, 15:30
I got it wrong since I used the 81 to prove there was only one team leader but:

With statement B alone we can mange to find it:

Since there is L<D, L should be 1 2 3 or 4.

But if L is 2 than the number of D should be divided in 2, meaning ... That we have 2.5 directors. Impossible.

Same logic with 3 and 4...

The only possible answer is 1. Choice C only helps to confirm this answer!

Am I right here?
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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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Paris75 wrote:
I got it wrong since I used the 81 to prove there was only one team leader but:

With statement B alone we can mange to find it:

Since there is L<D, L should be 1 2 3 or 4.

But if L is 2 than the number of D should be divided in 2, meaning ... That we have 2.5 directors. Impossible.

Same logic with 3 and 4...

The only possible answer is 1. Choice C only helps to confirm this answer!

Am I right here?


I think you almost got it right with your analysis, but you just missed it. I am sorry. C is incorrect. Please find the answer below:

Each of L team leaders has D group directors, making the total number of group directors equal to (L)(D). And each of those group directors has F fundraisers, again requiring multiplication: that total is (L)(D)(F). (You can try this by plugging in small numbers - if each of 2 leaders has 3 directors, you know there would be 6 directors)

So while statement 1 is not sufficient (there are multiple combinations that could get you to 81, such as L = 1, D = 2, and F = 39; or L = 1, D = 5, and F = 15), statement 2 guarantees that there is only one team leader. This is because 5 is a prime number, and you know that the number of group directors = LD. The only possible way for LD to equal 5 is if L is 1 and D is 5, or if D is 1 and L is 5. And since the stimulus tells you that there are more directors than leaders, the combination must be 5 directors and 1 leader. Accordingly, statement 2 is sufficient.

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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2014, 06:46
Hey... I'm not sure about this one, I feel A is sufficient too.

From the question we've got:

Total number of people on Dallas team = L + L*D + L*D*F = L * (D + D*F + 1) = L * (D(1+F) + 1) = 81

Given that 81 = 3^4, L must be either 1, 3, 9, 27, or 81. However we also know that L>D, so there's no need to check the combinations where L = 9 or higher.

There a bunch of combinations where L=1, as D can then be equal to any factor of 81-1.
However, there are no combinations where L=3 and where L>D, because in that case D must be a factor of 26, i.e. 1, 2, or 13. 3 is larger than 1 or 2, and 13 doesn't work because in that case F = 1, and 13 Directors can't split 1 fundraiser between them!

So I find that prompt A is sufficient to determine that L = 1.

But VeritasPrep's CAT says I'm wrong, as does this thread, so please explain what I'm missing here!
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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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li220 wrote:
Hey... I'm not sure about this one, I feel A is sufficient too.

From the question we've got:

Total number of people on Dallas team = L + L*D + L*D*F = L * (D + D*F + 1) = L * (D(1+F) + 1) = 81

Given that 81 = 3^4, L must be either 1, 3, 9, 27, or 81. However we also know that L>D, so there's no need to check the combinations where L = 9 or higher.

There a bunch of combinations where L=1, as D can then be equal to any factor of 81-1.
However, there are no combinations where L=3 and where L>D, because in that case D must be a factor of 26, i.e. 1, 2, or 13. 3 is larger than 1 or 2, and 13 doesn't work because in that case F = 1, and 13 Directors can't split 1 fundraiser between them!

So I find that prompt A is sufficient to determine that L = 1.

But VeritasPrep's CAT says I'm wrong, as does this thread, so please explain what I'm missing here!


hi, the highlighted portion is wrong. it's actually the other way around. D>L. now try for L=3, we have D=13 and F=2.

i hope it helps.
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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2014, 08:25
manpreetsingh86 wrote:
li220 wrote:
Hey... I'm not sure about this one, I feel A is sufficient too.

From the question we've got:

Total number of people on Dallas team = L + L*D + L*D*F = L * (D + D*F + 1) = L * (D(1+F) + 1) = 81

Given that 81 = 3^4, L must be either 1, 3, 9, 27, or 81. However we also know that L>D, so there's no need to check the combinations where L = 9 or higher.

There a bunch of combinations where L=1, as D can then be equal to any factor of 81-1.
However, there are no combinations where L=3 and where L>D, because in that case D must be a factor of 26, i.e. 1, 2, or 13. 3 is larger than 1 or 2, and 13 doesn't work because in that case F = 1, and 13 Directors can't split 1 fundraiser between them!

So I find that prompt A is sufficient to determine that L = 1.

But VeritasPrep's CAT says I'm wrong, as does this thread, so please explain what I'm missing here!


hi, the highlighted portion is wrong. it's actually the other way around. D>L. now try for L=3, we have D=13 and F=2.

i hope it helps.



Hey thanks Manpreet. You're right, i meant D>L. You've made me realise that actually my mistake was to confuse F and the total number of fundraisers. I assumed that F = 1 means there's only 1 fundraiser total, when actually that means there's 1 fundraiser per Director, which is entirely possible.

So i think what you mean is L = 3, D = 13, and F = 1

Thanks for quick response!
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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2015, 06:41
Gmat1008 wrote:
A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, with each of its L team leaders responsible for D group directors, and each of those D group directors responsible for F fundraisers. If the only three positions on each local team are team leaders, group directors, and fundraisers, and there are more group directors than team leaders, how many team leaders are on the Dallas team?

(1) There are 81 total members on the Dallas team

(2) There are 5 group directors on the Dallas team


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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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New post 15 Mar 2016, 13:03
Engr2012 wrote:
Gmat1008 wrote:
A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, with each of its L team leaders responsible for D group directors, and each of those D group directors responsible for F fundraisers. If the only three positions on each local team are team leaders, group directors, and fundraisers, and there are more group directors than team leaders, how many team leaders are on the Dallas team?

(1) There are 81 total members on the Dallas team

(2) There are 5 group directors on the Dallas team


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1. Refer to the posts above for a solution to your question.

2. Always search before you post a question.


Hey is there anyway you can provide a clear solution to this?

I am having a hard time interpreting the stimulus

Thanks
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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2016, 08:21
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GMATDemiGod wrote:
Engr2012 wrote:
Gmat1008 wrote:
A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, with each of its L team leaders responsible for D group directors, and each of those D group directors responsible for F fundraisers. If the only three positions on each local team are team leaders, group directors, and fundraisers, and there are more group directors than team leaders, how many team leaders are on the Dallas team?

(1) There are 81 total members on the Dallas team

(2) There are 5 group directors on the Dallas team


Please provide kudos and help me unlock the GMATclub test


1. Refer to the posts above for a solution to your question.

2. Always search before you post a question.


Hey is there anyway you can provide a clear solution to this?

I am having a hard time interpreting the stimulus

Thanks


Sure. Look below.

The question tells us that there are L leads, each with D directors and each D has F fundraisers. The question is asking you L=?

Now assume some smaller values to make sense of the given information. Lets say there is 1 lead, 2 directors for this 1 lead and in turn each of the 2 directors has 3 fundraisers.

Thus the total number of people = 1+2+6 = 9 ---> Also equal to L+LD+DF (you can try with different combinations).

Per statement 1, L + L*D + L*D*F = 81 ---> L(1+D+DF) = 81 ---> 81/L MUST be an integer ---> L = multiple of 3 or 1

As mentioned above, the possible combinations are L = 1, D = 2, and F = 39; or L = 3, D = 13, and F = 1 or L = 1, D = 5, and F = 15 are the only possible cases.

Thus you get 2 different values of L. NOT sufficient.

Per statement 2, D=5 , this clearly eliminates 2 of the 3 cases we looked at in S1. Thus, this statement is sufficient.

B is thus the correct answer.

Hope this helps.
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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2017, 17:09
Where does it say that all teams/organizational units are the same size? Must all "D group directors" have the same number of "F fundraisers"? Or why can't one L team leader have 2 D group directors and another L team leader has 3 D group directors ?

Also how can one team have more than one leader ("how many team leaders are on the Dallas team")?

Is this a culture thing?

Or perhaps I am just getting started with my studies so I'm not familiar with the implied constraints for DS questions. To me, it doesn't look like the question is restricting all L team leaders to have the same number of D group directors.

A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, with each of its L team leaders responsible for D group directors, and each of those D group directors responsible for F fundraisers. If the only three positions on each local team are team leaders, group directors, and fundraisers, and there are more group directors than team leaders, how many team leaders are on the Dallas team?
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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2017, 21:55
Hi One question,

can L Team leaders each can be responsible to same D directors? I am trying to understand this question. If L Team Leaders each will be responsible for different D directors, then statement 2 is sufficient.

Please clarify.
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Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams, [#permalink]

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New post 16 Dec 2017, 11:54
Hi VeritasPrepKarishma

Statement 2 : sufficient as L * D = 5 and D > L => L = 1, D = 5

Statement 1: I have one question
given L + L*D + L*D*F = 81

if L =1, D ( 1+F) = 80, we can various D and F, but L = 1
if L =3, D ( 1+F) = 26
=> case 1: D = 2 AND F = 12 (this case is not possible, as D > L)
=> case 2: D = 13 AND F = 1 ( this case is possible, but in the question prompt, we are given F fundraisers (plural), so F cannot be 1, as in one of DS questions, i got tricked into this plurality concept). If we consider F as plural, then F cannot be 1, L cannot be 3 => only L = 1 is possible => proving to be sufficient.

So should we take this plurality concept into account?

Please clarify

thanks
Re: A nonprofit group organizes its local fundraisers in teams,   [#permalink] 16 Dec 2017, 11:54
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