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According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count

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According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles County, if one were to count the Los Angeles metropolitan area as a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that is bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands.

A. if one were to count the Los Angeles metropolitan area as a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that is

B. if the Los Angeles metropolitan area is counted as a separate nation, it has the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that being

C. if the Los Angeles metropolitan area were a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product,

D. were the Los Angeles metropolitan area a separate nation, it will have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, which is

E. when the Los Angeles metropolitan area is counted as a separate nation, it has the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, thus


My doubt is if 'Los Angeles metropolitan area' uses the verb 'were', that means it is regarded as plural right ? So usage of it in 'it would have the...' will make it a wrong option right ?
Guys, can anyone help me out here ? Am I missing anything ?

Originally posted by ted123 on 19 Dec 2015, 23:45.
Last edited by abhimahna on 27 Feb 2017, 05:26, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2015, 23:59
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ted123 wrote:
According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles County, if the Los Angeles metropolitan area were a separate nation, it would have the world's eleventh largest gross national product, bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands.

The underlined portion is the correct answer to Qn 30 of GMAT Verbal 2016.

My doubt is if 'Los Angeles metropolitan area' uses the verb 'were', that means it is regarded as plural right ? So usage of it in 'it would have the...' will make it a wrong option right ?

Guys, can anyone help me out here ? Am I missing anything ?


Hi,
it is correct the way it is..
reason:-
'if' is used in hypothetical situations and the 'if clause' in these situations takes plural verb irrespective of the singular subject..
for example..
if I were the prime minister, i would do ....
if country x were a super power, it would have flexed its muscles more than present super powers..
hope it helps

three formats of conditional sentences..

1) If + present simple , future simple
Example: If you work hard, you will pass with good marks.

2) If + past simple , conditional simple (would + infinitive)
Example: as in the cases mentioned above

3) If + past perfect, past conditional
Example: If ravi had learnt his lessons, he wouldn't have failed his exam
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2017, 10:55
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According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles County, if one were to count the Los Angeles metropolitan area as a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that is bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands.

Issue: Structure | Meaning

Analysis:
1. The sentence talks about a hypothetical situation in which Los Angeles metropolitan area is a nation, though it is actually not.
- The correct form for such cases is: if + subject + simple past tense + could/would/might + verb in simple form
- So the form of this sentence should be: if X were Y, it would ....


I have highlighted the issues in options below:

A. if one were to count the Los Angeles metropolitan area as a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that is
- ", that.." that is incorrectly used for non-essential modifier here

B. if the Los Angeles metropolitan area is counted as a separate nation, it has the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that being
- ", that.." that is incorrectly used for non-essential modifier here

C. if the Los Angeles metropolitan area were a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product,

D. were the Los Angeles metropolitan area a separate nation, it will have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, which is

E. when the Los Angeles metropolitan area is counted as a separate nation, it has the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, thus

Answer: C
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Dec 2015, 00:07
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Quote:
My doubt is if 'Los Angeles metropolitan area' uses the verb 'were', that means it is regarded as plural right ? So usage of it in 'it would have the...' will make it a wrong option right ?

Guys, can anyone help me out here ? Am I missing anything ?


the answer to your question lies in the following: the mood of the sentence is HYPOTHETICAL; i.e, the sentence is talking about the imaginary situation .it is similar to a sentence : if I WERE a millionare ......... ----->"I" is singular but still takes the plural "WERE"
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Oct 2016, 22:41
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chetan2u wrote:
ted123 wrote:
According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles County, if the Los Angeles metropolitan area were a separate nation, it would have the world's eleventh largest gross national product, bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands.

The underlined portion is the correct answer to Qn 30 of GMAT Verbal 2016.

My doubt is if 'Los Angeles metropolitan area' uses the verb 'were', that means it is regarded as plural right ? So usage of it in 'it would have the...' will make it a wrong option right ?

Guys, can anyone help me out here ? Am I missing anything ?


Hi,
it is correct the way it is..
reason:-
'if' is used in hypothetical situations and the 'if clause' in these situations takes plural verb irrespective of the singular subject..
for example..
if I were the prime minister, i would do ....
if country x were a super power, it would have flexed its muscles more than present super powers..
hope it helps

three formats of conditional sentences..

1) If + present simple , future simple
Example: If you work hard, you will pass with good marks.

2) If + past simple , conditional simple (would + infinitive)
Example: as in the cases mentioned above

3) If + past perfect, past conditional
Example: If ravi had learnt his lessons, he wouldn't have failed his exam



"Would Have" in "then clause" , requires past perfect in "If clause".

option C . has "would have" in then clause but no past perfect in if clause.

i am confused.

pls help
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2017, 12:17
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There are three types of conditional sentences: First Conditional, Second Conditional, and Third Conditional

1. First Conditional: if clause = If + present tense, then main clause=- future (will) or present tense + bare infinitive
(Bare infinitive means the base form of the verb)
Example: If I have enough money, I will buy a house (future tense)
If the sum of the digits of a number is divisible by three, the number is divisible by three

2. Second Conditional: If clause = if + simple past tense, then main clause = would or might or could + bare infinitive
Example: If I had enough money, I would buy a house
If I were Bill Gates, I would donate $100 to Mother Theresa's Ashram every month.

3. Third Conditional: If clause = If + past perfect, then the main clause = would have + past participle (technically called the conditional perfect)
Example: If I had had enough money, I would have bought a house.

rishabhdxt wrote

Quote:
"Would Have" in "then clause", requires past perfect in "If clause".

Option C. has "would have" in then clause but no past perfect in if clause.

i am confused.


The 'would have' in the then clause you have referred is not past perfect. It is simply the future past of will namely 'would' + the bare infinitive 'have'. This example corresponds to the second conditional cited above.
If you want to use a past perfect in the 'if clause', then the sentence will be:

if one had counted the Los Angeles metropolitan area as a separate nation, it would have had the world’s eleventh largest gross national product -- Please note that the conditional past perfect you had in mind takes the form of 'would have had'
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According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Feb 2018, 22:42
Hi VeritasPrepKarishma GMATNinja generis

Can you please help me to understand usage of two THATs and comparison in A/ E?
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2018, 02:14
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adkikani wrote:
Hi VeritasPrepKarishma GMATNinja generis

Can you please help me to understand usage of two THATs and comparison in A/ E?


You need to use subjunctive here - Considering Los Angeles metropolitan area a separate nation is hypothetical. It is not a separate nation. Hypothetical situations use subjunctive case. It uses the second conditional discussed here: https://www.veritasprep.com/blog/2015/1 ... nals-gmat/

In (A), "that" is used incorrectly. The first "that" acts as a relative pronoun which is restrictive so it shouldn't be after a comma. Though what follows that is not a restrictive modifier since it only adds to already well defined "eleventh largest GNP". Hence the use of that is incorrect.
The second that acts as a pronoun for "gross national product".

Here is a post on the uses of "that": https://www.veritasprep.com/blog/2017/0 ... t-on-gmat/
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2018, 07:16
Dear mikemcgarry sir,

I read all posts above and understand why option D is wrong.
But please confirm my understanding .
If is subordinating conjunction, which is missing in option D.
Thus two Independent clause can't be joined by just COMMA.
Hence option D is comma splice.

Thanks Prashant
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Sep 2018, 19:49
pg789 wrote:
Dear mikemcgarry sir,

I read all posts above and understand why option D is wrong.
But please confirm my understanding .
If is subordinating conjunction, which is missing in option D.
Thus two Independent clause can't be joined by just COMMA.
Hence option D is comma splice.

Thanks Prashant

The test for a comma splice is whether the components on either side of the comma can stand on their own as complete sentences.

In (D) we have "were the Los Angeles metropolitan area a separate nation, it will have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product." That first part, "were the Los Angeles metropolitan area a separate nation," isn't an independent clause. Rather, "were" is awkwardly acting as a subordinator -- basically, it functions similarly to the word "if", and makes the clause dependent.

It's better to use concrete grammatical/logical problems to eliminate (D). Others have noted that the second clause should use "would have" rather than "will have." Also, the clause following "the world's eleventh largest gross national product," begins with "which is" suggesting that this hypothetical is actually a fact. That's illogical, so (D) is out.

I hope that helps!
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Oct 2018, 01:31
look at choice A
it is rare that gmat test us the use of "that". I do not see that gmat test this point often on og problems.

I think that this point is the only error on choice A.

anyone can tell me the og problems, in which "that" error is tested. thank you
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2018, 05:34
Can someone please explain the reasoning for the answer.
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2019, 09:31
"it" in choice A is also wrong because it can refer to separate nation or Los angeles.
it is ambiguous
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2019, 16:37
thangvietnam, there's no pronoun ambiguity. All five choices use "it," but in the hypothetical situation described, L.A. and the autonomous nation are the same thing! It's like saying "If my car were a dog, it would wag its tail when it saw me." Does "it" mean car or dog? Who cares? They're both the same here. (And I want that car!)
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2019, 18:10
if country x were a super power, it would have flexed its muscles more than present super powers.

Would you explain me use of "were" in if clause and "would have VerbIII" in main clause?
What I understood till now that use of would have verbIII comes together with past perfect tense in if clause.


chetan2u wrote:
ted123 wrote:
According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles County, if the Los Angeles metropolitan area were a separate nation, it would have the world's eleventh largest gross national product, bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands.

The underlined portion is the correct answer to Qn 30 of GMAT Verbal 2016.

My doubt is if 'Los Angeles metropolitan area' uses the verb 'were', that means it is regarded as plural right ? So usage of it in 'it would have the...' will make it a wrong option right ?

Guys, can anyone help me out here ? Am I missing anything ?


Hi,
it is correct the way it is..
reason:-
'if' is used in hypothetical situations and the 'if clause' in these situations takes plural verb irrespective of the singular subject..
for example..
if I were the prime minister, i would do ....
if country x were a super power, it would have flexed its muscles more than present super powers..
hope it helps

three formats of conditional sentences..

1) If + present simple , future simple
Example: If you work hard, you will pass with good marks.

2) If + past simple , conditional simple (would + infinitive)
Example: as in the cases mentioned above

3) If + past perfect, past conditional
Example: If ravi had learnt his lessons, he wouldn't have failed his exam
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2019, 23:01
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chetan2u is right. To express a hypothetical (not in the past), we use "If x WERE . . . it WOULD":

If I were you, I would not press that button.
If the album were any good, I would be surprised.
If her parents were alive, they would be very proud of her.
If her father were alive, he would be very proud of her.
(Note no change between plural and singular.)
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Feb 2019, 00:48
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gvij wrote


if country x were a super power, it would have flexed its muscles more than present super powers.

Would you explain me use of "were" in if clause and "would have VerbIII" in main clause?

What I understood until now that use of would have verbIII comes together with past perfect tense in if clause.


The cited first clause is wrong. You can't combine were with would have flexed. At best, you can put it three ways correctly.

1. If country X had been a superpower, it would have flexed its muscles more than present super powers.

2. Had country X been a super power, it would have flexed its muscles more than present super powers.

3. If country X were a super power, it would flex its muscles more than present super powers.

More importantly, we must remember that this is no more than a flight of fancy and that country X would never be a super power either now or in the future.
However, your understanding expressed in the second clause, that would have + past participle in the main clause is right only if it has a past perfect in the 'if clause, is perfectly ok.



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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2019, 08:18
DmitryFarber wrote:
chetan2u is right. To express a hypothetical (not in the past), we use "If x WERE . . . it WOULD":

If I were you, I would not press that button.
If the album were any good, I would be surprised.
If her parents were alive, they would be very proud of her.
If her father were alive, he would be very proud of her.
(Note no change between plural and singular.)



What confuses me is the fact that I must assume that it is hypothetical. What if L.A. County becomes independent in 5 years and students see this question. Do I really must assume it, only because currently its not true but hypothetical?

Thanks in Advance!
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2019, 20:58
That’s a pretty far out speculation! Sure, you could argue that this requires us to know that L.A. is not a country, but this should be common knowledge. Correct grammar always relies on meaning and does not operate in a vacuum.

In any case, we need to use all 5 choices to discern the intended meaning, and from such a reading it becomes clear that the author is presenting a hypothetical, not an established fact.

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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Apr 2019, 00:34
I chose C because of proper conditional usage. But still curries about modifier ", bigger than that of Australia, .."

"If the Los Angeles metropolitan area were a separate nation, it would have the world???s eleventh largest gross national product,
bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands."

I cannot remember the cases when I met such modifiers starting from comparative adjective. Could someone explain their usage? Thanks a tone! :)
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count   [#permalink] 23 Apr 2019, 00:34

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