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According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count

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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 16 May 2019, 20:22
if we see "that-clause", think that there are 2 kinds of noun, which is modified by that-clause. doing so helps find the errors. look at choice A, "that is bigger than.." implies that there is another GDP, that is smaller than GDP of A, M and N.

this is absurd. A is gone

one problem for sc is that we understand the explanation but can not apply the knowledge into solving new problem . above skill help us solve new problems.
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2019, 05:28
EducationAisle

For option C, what does the statement "bigger than that..." act as? I rejected this choice because it seems that it is not noun + noun modifier or any modifier for that matter.

Thank you
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2019, 05:39
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Brego7 wrote:
it seems that it is not noun + noun modifier

Yeah, but isn't it implied:

...the world’s eleventh largest GNP, (GNP that is) bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands.

For example:

He is a tall man, taller than this world has even seen.

It equivalent to:

He is a tall man, (a man who is) taller than this world has even seen.

Do agree that I haven't seen many such examples getting tested on GMAT.
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2019, 06:24
EducationAisle wrote:
Brego7 wrote:
it seems that it is not noun + noun modifier

Yeah, but isn't it implied:

...the world’s eleventh largest GNP, (GNP that is) bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands.

For example:

He is a tall man, taller than this world has even seen.

It equivalent to:

He is a tall man, (a man who is) taller than this world has even seen.

Do agree that I haven't seen many such examples getting tested on GMAT.


I am having a hard time understanding this. Do you know any example on the internet that people are talking about or in your book similar to this.

From what I understood is that "bigger than..." is a noun + noun modifier. Noun is ommited in this case (this is first time i EVER see this) and "bigger" is an adjective that is modifying our noun that is not stated.

Is that correct understanding??

Side note: Learning about all this grammar, makes me even lazier writing grammatically correct in the forums lol. Don't you think talking and writing grammatically correct will take too much time in ordinary life? Like picking correct verb tense in the past to indicate what came first in ordinary speech?

Thank you again very much! You the best
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2019, 08:23
Actually another (and perhaps simpler) way to look at the construct in C is that bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands is just modifying gross national product.

Basically since bigger is an adjective, it will modify a noun, in this case gross national product.
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2020, 05:38
According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles County, if one were to count the Los Angeles metropolitan area as a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that is bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands.

A. if one were to count the Los Angeles metropolitan area as a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that is

B. if the Los Angeles metropolitan area is counted as a separate nation, it has the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that being

C. if the Los Angeles metropolitan area were a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product,

D. were the Los Angeles metropolitan area a separate nation, it will have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, which is

E. when the Los Angeles metropolitan area is counted as a separate nation, it has the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, thus

A is incorrect because relative pronoun modifier "that" is used with a comma before it. Since it is an essential modifier it should be used without a comma. Also use of that is bigger than that of... conveys that the GNP of LA is currently bigger than that of other countries. But the intended meaning is to talk about a hypothetical situation.

B. if clause should not have singular verb form "is". Use of being is incorrect.

C. Correct answer.

D. Incorrect if then clause usage. if simple past, then would.... . Use of which is implies that the GNP of LA is currently bigger than the GNP of other countries.

E. Use of when is incorrect. Using thus to imply a cause and effect is incorrect.
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2020, 23:46
ankaua wrote:
I chose C because of proper conditional usage. But still curries about modifier ", bigger than that of Australia, .."

"If the Los Angeles metropolitan area were a separate nation, it would have the world???s eleventh largest gross national product,
bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands."

I cannot remember the cases when I met such modifiers starting from comparative adjective. Could someone explain their usage? Thanks a tone! :)

ankaua
I am not an expert but here is what i understood.
"bigger than that of Australia, .." has been used after comma as a modifier.
Is it necessary to use? I don't think so. The sentence can very well end at 'gross national product' without 'that is' which is incorrectly used.

- According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles County, if one were to count the Los Angeles metropolitan area as a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product. bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands.

Other ways to write the sentence:
- Bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands, gross national product of LA County ....
- Gross national product, bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands, of LA County ....

Here note that above sentences are not subjunctive in nature. If you can formulate one lease share. The point is you can ignore 'bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands'.

Here's one that you might not be able to ignore this modifier:
- Having Gross national product bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands, LA County ....
again not subjunctive.

Hope this makes sense.
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2020, 07:50
ankaua wrote:
I chose C because of proper conditional usage. But still curries about modifier ", bigger than that of Australia, .."

"If the Los Angeles metropolitan area were a separate nation, it would have the world???s eleventh largest gross national product,
bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands."

I cannot remember the cases when I met such modifiers starting from comparative adjective. Could someone explain their usage? Thanks a tone! :)


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Hi experts, I have the same doubt with reg the usage of the modifier starting with a comma "bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands". Doesn't it need a that or which before the modifier.
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Re: According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Apr 2020, 13:03
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This is a fairly normal usage. It would actually be wrong to open this modifier with "that" or "which." Think about what we'd have to do to make that happen. First, we're not restricting the noun down, so we'd need "which," not "that." But after "which," then what? We can't say "is," because this is just a hypothetical. We'd need "would be." So the relevant portion of our sentence would read this way: "It would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, which would be bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands." Now we'd be saying that IF Los Angeles had the eleventh largest GNP, THEN that GNP would be bigger than those others. That's much more indirect and complicated than necessary.

So what is the author really doing? The "bigger than" modifier just explains that this GNP, were we to measure it that way, would be bigger than some others. There's nothing wrong with using "bigger" directly as a noun modifier. In fact, as lnm87 demonstrated, we could even move this modifier elsewhere in the sentence and still apply it correctly to the noun in question. Some of us might like to see "an amount bigger than . . . ," but this isn't strictly necessary, as there isn't anything else for "bigger" to apply to, so there's no real chance of misinterpretation.
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According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count  [#permalink]

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New post 27 May 2020, 04:31
PS, An Obvious thing : To improve yourself in SC, REVIEW every mistake in every answer choice after you attempt a problem.
According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles County, if one were to count the Los Angeles metropolitan area as a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that is bigger than that of Australia, Mexico, or the Netherlands.
This is an example of Hypothetical Subjunctive. Whenever we use Hypothetical subjunctive, we follow - If/As if/ As though + Subject + Simple Past/were(in case of to be) + object, subject + would + object.
So every choice where would is not used is incorrect.
That is an essential modifier, which is not preceded by comma.

A. if one were to count the Los Angeles metropolitan area as a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that is
No comma before that. Incorrect use of that

B. if the Los Angeles metropolitan area is counted as a separate nation, it has the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, that being
Hypothetical Subjunctive – Requires would
No comma before that. Incorrect use of that

C. if the Los Angeles metropolitan area were a separate nation, it would have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product,
Best of ALL

D. were the Los Angeles metropolitan area a separate nation, it will have the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, which is

Hypothetical Subjunctive – Requires would

E. when the Los Angeles metropolitan area is counted as a separate nation, it has the world’s eleventh largest gross national product, thus
Hypothetical Subjunctive – Requires would
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According to the Economic Development Corporation of Los Angeles Count   [#permalink] 27 May 2020, 04:31

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