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All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted

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All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2014, 08:28
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A
B
C
D
E

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All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a time
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2015, 13:59
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JarvisR wrote:
My 2 cents.
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.
Intended meaning:
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal.
The urban renewal is led by new immigrant.(How?) one clapboard house at a time. Here NP is modifying clause/action here.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
>>Tense error
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a time
>>Changes meaning.

Dear JarvisR,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

This is a tricky question, using a somewhat atypical idiomatic structure. You are correct that (A) is the best answer.

The idiom "one X at a time" is an adverbial phrase, that is, a verb modifier, that is often separated from the rest of the action by commas.
He washed the dishes, one grimy pot at a time.
She read her way through Shakespeare, one play at a time.
The politician campaigned through the sparsely inhabited northern section of the state, one cow town at a time.

The X in this idiom is, in one way or another, a definable individual element of the larger process described, what might be called an "atom" of the larger process.

Here, the larger process is "urban renewal." The smallest discernible "piece" of urban renewal would be the renewal & renovation of a single house. Thus, we have "signs of a brick urban renewal . . . , one clapboard house at a time." It's a sophisticated touch to put in a descriptive adjective, here "clapboard," so that we are both describing the pace of the renewal as well as providing a color detail about the situation.

Does all this make sense?
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 21 Aug 2014, 23:14
1
execnitinsharma wrote:
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a time


Don't just answer, share the explanation as well!!


C,B & E change the meaning..Quite evident i think..
Between A and D ..Had been again is wrong as nowhere in the original sentence has it been implied that the renewal is not an ongoing phenomenon.
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Originally posted by JusTLucK04 on 21 Aug 2014, 21:45.
Last edited by JusTLucK04 on 21 Aug 2014, 23:14, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2014, 22:08
JusTLucK04 wrote:
execnitinsharma wrote:
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a time


Don't just answer, share the explanation as well!!


C,B & E change the meaning..Quite evident i think..I don't know whether i am using the correct term here..but absolute modifier or something should be it
Between A and D ..Had been again is wrong as nowhere in the original sentence has it been implied that the renewal is not an ongoing phenomenon.


In A, "one clapboard house at a time" is modifying "new immigrants". I am not able to get any meaning out of the modifier. Can please elaborate on this.
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2014, 22:25
2
1
desaichinmay22 wrote:
JusTLucK04 wrote:
execnitinsharma wrote:
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a time


Don't just answer, share the explanation as well!!


C,B & E change the meaning..Quite evident i think..I don't know whether i am using the correct term here..but absolute modifier or something should be it
Between A and D ..Had been again is wrong as nowhere in the original sentence has it been implied that the renewal is not an ongoing phenomenon.


In A, "one clapboard house at a time" is modifying "new immigrants". I am not able to get any meaning out of the modifier. Can please elaborate on this.


Dear Chinmay,

I am happy to help.

In option A, noun modifier 'one clapboard house at a time' correctly modifies 'brisk urban renewal' in the preceding clause. This is very much a valid application of noun modifiers. You can refer the application of these type of modifiers here http://gmatclub.com/forum/noun-noun-modifiers-the-most-versatile-modifier-137292.html Refer to the second application of Noun+Noun Modifier piece. B incorrectly associates 'one clapboard house at a time' with new immigrants and the sentence takes a meaning of the sort that 'one clapboard house at a time' and 'new immigrants' both led 'brisk urban renewal'. In C, the noun modifier 'one clapboard house at a time' incorrectly modifies 'new immigrants'. D incorrectly uses past perfect stating that 'new immigrants' led 'brisk urban renewal' sometime in past before some event. E does the same mistake as that of B and states that 'brisk urban renewal' was led by both 'new immigrants' and 'one clapboard house at a time'.

I hope I helped!! Cheers!!
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2014, 22:50
3
Quote:
execnitinsharma wrote: In option A, noun modifier 'one clapboard house at a time' correctly modifies 'brisk urban renewal' in the preceding clause. This is very much a valid application of noun modifiers.


this interpretation is not entirely correct . "noun modifiers" must attach to the noun that they modify .that's the basic difference between "noun modifiers" and "verb modifiers"

Quote:
In C, the noun modifier 'one clapboard house at a time' incorrectly modifies 'new immigrants'.


first of all the modifier in C is not "one clapboard house at a time" but "with one clapboard house at a time". secondly "with one clapboard house at a time" is not just a noun modifier .yes it can be a "adverbial" in nature at times

this question seems faulty . Forced to select an option, i will select option A but i feel it is not correct
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2014, 23:03
aditya8062 wrote:
Quote:
execnitinsharma wrote: In option A, noun modifier 'one clapboard house at a time' correctly modifies 'brisk urban renewal' in the preceding clause. This is very much a valid application of noun modifiers.


this interpretation is not entirely correct . "noun modifiers" must attach to the noun that they modify .that's the basic difference between "noun modifiers" and "verb modifiers"

Quote:
In C, the noun modifier 'one clapboard house at a time' incorrectly modifies 'new immigrants'.


first of all the modifier in C is not "one clapboard house at a time" but "with one clapboard house at a time". secondly "with one clapboard house at a time" is not just a noun modifier .yes it can be a "adverbial" in nature at times

this question seems faulty . Forced to select an option, i will select option A but i feel it is not correct


It is not absolutely necessary for the noun modifiers to touch the noun they modify. Please refer the URL which I have shared above. Also refer some of the Official Guide questions which have been shared in that URL. It is a very good article written by eGMAT in that URL.
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2014, 23:13
4
desaichinmay22 wrote:
JusTLucK04 wrote:
execnitinsharma wrote:
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a time


Don't just answer, share the explanation as well!!


C,B & E change the meaning..Quite evident i think..I don't know whether i am using the correct term here..but absolute modifier or something should be it
Between A and D ..Had been again is wrong as nowhere in the original sentence has it been implied that the renewal is not an ongoing phenomenon.


In A, "one clapboard house at a time" is modifying "new immigrants". I am not able to get any meaning out of the modifier. Can please elaborate on this.


Ok..Let me try..

I tried painting the house in Red Color, one brick at a time

So one brick at a time is modifying the action painting..How did he paint--> One brick at a time...
llly..here clapboard is a type of something..lets skip it

All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one house at a time.

Urban renewal is happening one house at a time -->is what it seems to convey..

so with doesn't make sense here and as this is a modifier modifying the action renewal,it cannot be placed anywhere else.
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2014, 23:17
Quote:
It is not absolutely necessary for the noun modifiers to touch the noun they modify. Please refer the URL which I have shared above. Also refer some of the Official Guide questions which have been shared in that URL. It is a very good article written by eGMAT in that URL.



i agree but my point was that the reason u were using to eliminate C can be applied to eliminate A as well.
i will explain how . you are saying that modifier in C is applying to "new immigrant" then the same logic can be applied in A as well !!
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2014, 23:32
aditya8062 wrote:
Quote:
It is not absolutely necessary for the noun modifiers to touch the noun they modify. Please refer the URL which I have shared above. Also refer some of the Official Guide questions which have been shared in that URL. It is a very good article written by eGMAT in that URL.



i agree but my point was that the reason u were using to eliminate C can be applied to eliminate A as well.
i will explain how . you are saying that modifier in C is applying to "new immigrant" then the same logic can be applied in A as well !!


In option C, 'with one clapboard house at a time' obviously does not modify 'new immigrants'. Moreover, it does not modify any other noun or noun clause in the sentence. Let me add this to my explanation. Had it modified any other, may be 'brisk urban renewal', the sentence would have looked like 'All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal with one clapboard house at a time'....this looks a faulty sentence to me. I hope that helps!! Cheers!
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2014, 00:26
"one clapboard house at a time" is an absolute phrase I guess! You can find a nice explanation for absolute phrases in MGMAT. Actually, that is what I have referred. Once you read that, option A will make sense to you.
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 01:58
My 2 cents.
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.
Intended meaning:
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal.
The urban renewal is led by new immigrant.(How?) one clapboard house at a time. Here NP is modifying clause/action here.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
>>Tense error
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a time
>>Changes meaning.
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2014, 06:47
As suggested, I went back to MGMAT SC guide and looked for Absolute Phrases.
I also saw an example in the book :
Owen walked out of the store,with his head held high.
This is a right sentence.
So why can't option B can be right for the question in hand.
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Nov 2014, 00:40
Quote:

Dear Chinmay,

I am happy to help.

In option A, noun modifier 'one clapboard house at a time' correctly modifies 'brisk urban renewal' in the preceding clause. This is very much a valid application of noun modifiers. You can refer the application of these type of modifiers here http://gmatclub.com/forum/noun-noun-modifiers-the-most-versatile-modifier-137292.html Refer to the second application of Noun+Noun Modifier piece. B incorrectly associates 'one clapboard house at a time' with new immigrants and the sentence takes a meaning of the sort that 'one clapboard house at a time' and 'new immigrants' both led 'brisk urban renewal'. In C, the noun modifier 'one clapboard house at a time' incorrectly modifies 'new immigrants'. D incorrectly uses past perfect stating that 'new immigrants' led 'brisk urban renewal' sometime in past before some event. E does the same mistake as that of B and states that 'brisk urban renewal' was led by both 'new immigrants' and 'one clapboard house at a time'.

I hope I helped!! Cheers!!



noun+ noun modifier can modify a clause or a noun placed anywhere in the preceding clause until and unless meaning is clear and unambiguous. But in option 'A'
one clapboard house at a time is a noun modifier not a noun + noun modifier. And the above rule doesn't apply to noun modifier(noun modifier demands that noun should be touching it). So 'A' can't be the correct choice.
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2015, 18:41
solitaryreaper wrote:
Quote:

Dear Chinmay,

I am happy to help.

In option A, noun modifier 'one clapboard house at a time' correctly modifies 'brisk urban renewal' in the preceding clause. This is very much a valid application of noun modifiers. You can refer the application of these type of modifiers here http://gmatclub.com/forum/noun-noun-modifiers-the-most-versatile-modifier-137292.html Refer to the second application of Noun+Noun Modifier piece. B incorrectly associates 'one clapboard house at a time' with new immigrants and the sentence takes a meaning of the sort that 'one clapboard house at a time' and 'new immigrants' both led 'brisk urban renewal'. In C, the noun modifier 'one clapboard house at a time' incorrectly modifies 'new immigrants'. D incorrectly uses past perfect stating that 'new immigrants' led 'brisk urban renewal' sometime in past before some event. E does the same mistake as that of B and states that 'brisk urban renewal' was led by both 'new immigrants' and 'one clapboard house at a time'.

I hope I helped!! Cheers!!



noun+ noun modifier can modify a clause or a noun placed anywhere in the preceding clause until and unless meaning is clear and unambiguous. But in option 'A'
one clapboard house at a time is a noun modifier not a noun + noun modifier. And the above rule doesn't apply to noun modifier(noun modifier demands that noun should be touching it). So 'A' can't be the correct choice.


Not all noun modifiers are adjectives, ones require to be placed right next to the noun it modifies (like what I just did). Noun modifiers come in all different forms: adjectives, nouns, compound nouns, phrases, etc. A must be the correct choice because no other maintains the logic required for the sentence to make sense.
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2015, 04:37
I have a doubt here.

What's the difference in the usage of adverbial modifier (with / without "with"), in below sentences.

All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.
A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time - Correct
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time - Wrong

Vs

In little more than a decade, Argentina has become the world’s leading exporter of honey,with nearly 90,000 tons a year sold to foreign markets, almost half of which going to the United States.
E. selling nearly 90,000 tons a year to foreign markets, withalmost half going - Correct
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2016, 16:58
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Q: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time [Correct]
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time – Illogical: “with one clapboard house at a time”
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time – Illogical: “with one clapboard house at a time”
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time – Tense: “had been” is not needed as the renewal led by immigrants is still going on
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a timeIllogical: led by X and “one clapboard house at a time”…a house cannot lead anything
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2016, 00:51
execnitinsharma wrote:
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a time



Hi,

Can someone explain the difference between option A and B?

Thanks in advance!!
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Re: All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2016, 10:52
subhamgarg91 wrote:
execnitinsharma wrote:
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a time



Hi,

Can someone explain the difference between option A and B?

Thanks in advance!!

Dear subhamgarg91,
I'm happy to respond. :-)

The short answer is that (A) is idiomatically correct and (B) sound clunky and awkward because it is idiomatically incorrect.

The phrase "one X at a time" is a common idiom in colloquial American English. It certainly could appear in a more academic context, as in this sentence. The idiom does not involve any preposition, and appending a preposition to the front of this idiom creates an awkward structure.

Does this answer your question?
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All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2017, 23:07
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execnitinsharma wrote:
All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted porches are signs of a brisk urban renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time.

A. renewal led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
B. renewal led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
C. renewal that has been led by new immigrants, with one clapboard house at a time
D. renewal, which had been led by new immigrants, one clapboard house at a time
E. renewal, which has been led by new immigrants and one clapboard house at a time


VERITAS PREP OFFICIAL SOLUTION:



This sentence correction problem uses an unusual modifier structure to “hide the correct answer” - a common tool used by testmakers that you learned about in the Advanced Verbal lesson. In (A) this is the modifier, “one clapboard at a time” – a rhetorical device used to emphasize how the new immigrants are leading the urban renewal. While you have surely seen such a structure in your reading, it is not common and as a result many students will eliminate it offhand. However (A) is correct and all the other answer choices contain fatal flaws. In (B) and (C) the “with one clapboard house at a time” is illogical and nonsensical. There is nothing in the sentence that is done “with one house at a time” The urban renewal is being led by immigrants “one house at a time” not “with one house at a time”. This is a good example of when you need to use logic and meaning to determine whether a decision point is correct. In (D), the past perfect tense “had been” is clearly wrong as the first part of the sentence states that it is going on right now and there is no point in the past for the past perfect to refer to. In (E), the correct present perfect is used but the sentence illogically suggests that the renewal was led by “one clapboard house at a time”. Only (A) has a grammatically correct structure that conveys a logical meaning. Answer is (A).
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All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted &nbs [#permalink] 25 Mar 2017, 23:07

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All across Detroit, whitewashed fences, new roofs, and freshly painted

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