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An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.

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An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2005, 13:50
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An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth. Rather, it heats water on clothes, thereby saving electricity and protecting delicate fibers by operating at a lower temperature. Microwaves are waves that usually heat metal objects, but developers of a microwave dryer are perfecting a process that will prevent thin metal objects such as hairpins from heating up and burning clothes.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly indicates that the process, when perfected, will be insufficient to make the dryer readily marketable?

(A) Metal snap fasteners on clothes that are commonly put into drying machines are about the same thickness as most hairpins.

(B) Many clothes that are currently placed into mechanical dryers are not placed there along with hairpins or other thin metal objects.

(C) The experimental microwave dryer uses more electricity than future, improved models would be expected to use.

(D) Drying clothes with the process would not cause more shrinkage than the currently used mechanical drying process causes.

(E) Many clothes that are frequently machine-dried by prospective customers incorporate thick metal parts such as decorative brass studs or buttons.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2005, 15:16
C.

If the experimental version uses more electricity than expected in the future, this means that perfecting a process that will prevent thin metal objects such as hairpins from heating up and burning clothes is not the only issue that has to be resolved before the microwave dryer becomes marketable.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2005, 15:23
Agree with C....When the process is focusssing on reducing the heating of metal here comes a new parameter which might again send back the Microwaveable Drying to the lab....
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2005, 18:20
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E ....noone knows how the machine will behave with thick metals, we only know abt thin metals
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2005, 20:55
C it is.
If it can't heat up the thin metal it will definitely not be able to heat up thick metals,that rules out E.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 28 May 2005, 21:06
banerjeea_98 wrote:
E ....noone knows how the machine will behave with thick metals, we only know abt thin metals


Banerjeea is right. Half the passage is devoted to addressing this problem of metal in a microwave [hinting that that is a significant potential issue], yet assurance is only given with regard to hairpin-thin metal items; the passage doesn't address the very real problem of thick metal objects on clothes.

And if you think microwaves that barely affect a hairpin won't affect a larger piece of metal, I invite you to place a paper clip, and then a large piece of metal, in a microwave oven, and see which one blows up the machine :twisted:
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2005, 12:52
A. These snaps will be taken care of after process are perfected. Dryer is marketable
B. Supports that fact that dryers are less likely to have thin metals in it - Dryer is marketable
C. Electricty might be saved in future models, but the current model might still be using less than the other models. Dryer is marketable
D. Not cause more shrinkage - means dryer is marketable
E. Passage gives no idea of the effect on thick metals. Assuming things on our own is out of scope. Best answer.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2005, 06:18
I go for E. If the current technology is just begining to resolve the problem with thin metal, how could it realistically deal with thick metals ??
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2005, 06:21
thin objects are heated fast than thick ones....So would still E be the answer?
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2005, 06:40
(A) Metal snap fasteners on clothes that are commonly put into drying machines are about the same thickness as most hairpins.
strengthens..
(B) Many clothes that are currently placed into mechanical dryers are not placed there along with hairpins or other thin metal objects.
still does not rule out the possibility...
(C) The experimental microwave dryer uses more electricity than future, improved models would be expected to use.
future models is out of scope..
(D) Drying clothes with the process would not cause more shrinkage than the currently used mechanical drying process causes.
strengthens..
(E) Many clothes that are frequently machine-dried by prospective customers incorporate thick metal parts such as decorative brass studs or buttons.
Right answer.. the microwave dryer usually heats metal objects, and scientists are perfecting a process that may work for small metal objects.. that still leaves clothes with thick metal parts which unusable...
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2005, 21:45
E it is.

(A) Metal snap fasteners on clothes that are commonly put into drying machines are about the same thickness as most hairpins.
Which means it's not going to be a problem.

(B) Many clothes that are currently placed into mechanical dryers are not placed there along with hairpins or other thin metal objects.
Even better.

(C) The experimental microwave dryer uses more electricity than future, improved models would be expected to use.
The stems says that it saves energy. So even if it uses more energy by some future unrealized model, it still have market potential before those future model is marketed.

(D) Drying clothes with the process would not cause more shrinkage than the currently used mechanical drying process causes.
Good then.

(E) Many clothes that are frequently machine-dried by prospective customers incorporate thick metal parts such as decorative brass studs of buttons.
Here's a problem. Thin metals would not be a problem, but thick metals are not garenteed to be problem free.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2005, 22:06
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OA is E!

I read B and then thought, if people do not leave hairpins etc then the whole research is readily doomed and the product would become unmarketable - hence I chose B.

But now I realise my mistake! - If people do not include hairpins, then, as the new dryers comsume less electricity and protect delicate fibers - they would definitely become more marketable then the existing mech. dryers!
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2005, 22:31
1) An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.

2) Rather, it heats water on clothes, thereby saving electricity and protecting delicate fibers by operating at a lower temperature.

3) Microwaves are waves that usually heat metal objects, but developers of a microwave dryer are perfecting a process that will prevent thin metal objects such as hairpins from heating up and burning clothes.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly indicates that the process, when perfected, will be insufficient to make the dryer readily marketable?

(A) Metal snap fasteners on clothes that are commonly put into drying machines are about the same thickness as most hairpins.
- if so, then the dryer would be marketable when the process is perfected

(B) Many clothes that are currently placed into mechanical dryers are not placed there along with hairpins or other thin metal objects.
- if so, then it's not a problem even when the process is not perfected

(C) The experimental microwave dryer uses more electricity than future, improved models would be expected to use.
- it doesn't matter if the dryer uses more electricity than future models. The end point is, even with this current model, it already uses less electricity than conventional dryers. Thus, it would still be more efficient and economical.

(D) Drying clothes with the process would not cause more shrinkage than the currently used mechanical drying process causes.
- This only states that no performance is sacrificed in the new dryer. A plus point, in fact for making the dryer marketable.

(E) Many clothes that are frequently machine-dried by prospective customers incorporate thick metal parts such as decorative brass studs or buttons.

I'll go with E. The process only involves not heating up thin metal objects. No mention is made of thick metal parts, so we do not know how the dryer will behave when such metal objects are thrown in along with the clothes.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2017, 20:38
this question has a special type of question and a confusing argument strcuture, nevertheless, options are too obvious to spot the right answer. Only E has the scope.

The type of the question is strengthen the conclusion that the experiemental microwave is not marketable.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Nov 2017, 07:38
Can you please explain why option C is incorrect.If the microwave uses more amount of electricity than used by the advanced models, it definitely is not on par with the available models in the maket and hence is not marketable. On the otherhand option E states that the clothes include thick metal parts, if the microwave is able to handle thin metal parts, it obviously can handle thick metal parts as well.However, I do agree that we cannot make such assumptions in CR. If so, we even cannot assume that the presence of thick metal parts poses a problem. So how can option E present the sound basis to doubt the marketability of microwave.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Nov 2017, 08:22
srikanth9502 wrote:
Can you please explain why option C is incorrect.If the microwave uses more amount of electricity than used by the advanced models, it definitely is not on par with the available models in the maket and hence is not marketable. On the otherhand option E states that the clothes include thick metal parts, if the microwave is able to handle thin metal parts, it obviously can handle thick metal parts as well.However, I do agree that we cannot make such assumptions in CR. If so, we even cannot assume that the presence of thick metal parts poses a problem. So how can option E present the sound basis to doubt the marketability of microwave.



My take on this is:

Suppose this : "In future , some XYZ company will invent a engine that will run on water." This does not mean that upcoming projects that use patrol should be abandoned or put on halt.
we even do not know when the upgraded version is coming in market ...So We need to a weakener that is prevailing with current design .

E --you can think , why only "thin metal" is mentioned in the argument why not only "metal" ....means author want to emphasize on size of metal .
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Nov 2017, 14:50
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srikanth9502 wrote:
Can you please explain why option C is incorrect.If the microwave uses more amount of electricity than used by the advanced models, it definitely is not on par with the available models in the maket and hence is not marketable. On the otherhand option E states that the clothes include thick metal parts, if the microwave is able to handle thin metal parts, it obviously can handle thick metal parts as well.However, I do agree that we cannot make such assumptions in CR. If so, we even cannot assume that the presence of thick metal parts poses a problem. So how can option E present the sound basis to doubt the marketability of microwave.

Quote:
An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth. Rather, it heats water on clothes, thereby saving electricity and protecting delicate fibers by operating at a lower temperature. Microwaves are waves that usually heat metal objects, but developers of a microwave dryer are perfecting a process that will prevent thin metal objects such as hairpins from heating up and burning clothes.
Which of the following, if true, most strongly indicates that the process, when perfected, will be insufficient to make the dryer readily marketable?
(A) Metal snap fasteners on clothes that are commonly put into drying machines are about the same thickness as most hairpins.
(B) Many clothes that are currently placed into mechanical dryers are not placed there along with hairpins or other thin metal objects.
(C) The experimental microwave dryer uses more electricity than future, improved models would be expected to use.
(D) Drying clothes with the process would not cause more shrinkage than the currently used mechanical drying process causes.
(E) Many clothes that are frequently machine-dried by prospective customers incorporate thick metal parts such as decorative brass studs or buttons.

Choice (C) does not compare the experimental microwave dryer to existing conventional dryers. Rather, choice (C) compares the experimental microwave dryer (i.e. the prototype) to future improved microwave models. In other words, they currently have an experimental prototype, and the new, improved models will use less electricity than the experimental version. That information does NOT allow us to compare the electricity usage of the microwave dryers to that of the conventional dryers on the market today. Thus, (C) should be eliminated.

As for choice (E), just because it can handle thin metal does NOT mean it can handle thick metal. For example, I have a pair of scissors that can cut thin pieces of cardboard. Does that mean that the scissors can cut THICK cardboard? ... not necessarily.

Furthermore, the passage specifically tells us that microwaves usually heat metal objects. The developers are trying to perfect a process that will prevent THIN metal objects from heating up in the dryer. If they succeed, THIN metal objects in the dryer will not pose a hazard, but the process does not help with THICK pieces of metal. In other words, microwaves usually heat ALL metal objects. There might be a way to prevent that from happening with THIN pieces of metal, but that would not address the problem with THICK pieces of metal. Thus, thick metal parts would still likely heat up and burn clothes.

(E) is the best answer.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Nov 2017, 19:25
chose E.
those prospective customers with thick metal parts will not purchase the microwaves dryer, rendering it not marketable
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2018, 11:56
Vithal wrote:
An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth. Rather, it heats water on clothes, thereby saving electricity and protecting delicate fibers by operating at a lower temperature. Microwaves are waves that usually heat metal objects, but developers of a microwave dryer are perfecting a process that will prevent thin metal objects such as hairpins from heating up and burning clothes.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly indicates that the process, when perfected, will be insufficient to make the dryer readily marketable?

(A) Metal snap fasteners on clothes that are commonly put into drying machines are about the same thickness as most hairpins.

(B) Many clothes that are currently placed into mechanical dryers are not placed there along with hairpins or other thin metal objects.

(C) The experimental microwave dryer uses more electricity than future, improved models would be expected to use.

(D) Drying clothes with the process would not cause more shrinkage than the currently used mechanical drying process causes.

(E) Many clothes that are frequently machine-dried by prospective customers incorporate thick metal parts such as decorative brass studs or buttons.


the question stem proves useful in this question. The question asks about why the new process cannot be marketed.
The option choices all sound reasonable, but only E is the strengthener. E says that the fasteners are a part of clothes.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth.  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2018, 00:24
Vithal wrote:
An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth. Rather, it heats water on clothes, thereby saving electricity and protecting delicate fibers by operating at a lower temperature. Microwaves are waves that usually heat metal objects, but developers of a microwave dryer are perfecting a process that will prevent thin metal objects such as hairpins from heating up and burning clothes.

Which of the following, if true, most strongly indicates that the process, when perfected, will be insufficient to make the dryer readily marketable?

(A) Metal snap fasteners on clothes that are commonly put into drying machines are about the same thickness as most hairpins.

(B) Many clothes that are currently placed into mechanical dryers are not placed there along with hairpins or other thin metal objects.

(C) The experimental microwave dryer uses more electricity than future, improved models would be expected to use.

(D) Drying clothes with the process would not cause more shrinkage than the currently used mechanical drying process causes.

(E) Many clothes that are frequently machine-dried by prospective customers incorporate thick metal parts such as decorative brass studs or buttons.


The answer is E

A very good question to test inference .
From the argument we can infer that new microwaves will thin metal parts if there present with the clothes now we have to infer from this if thin metal are heated surely thick metal parts will also be heated 100% thus clothes ,which are machine dried have decorative thick metal part, will burn and therefore the microwave will not sell well.
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Re: An experimental microwave clothes dryer heats neither air nor cloth. &nbs [#permalink] 05 Feb 2018, 00:24

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