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Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,

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Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 06 Apr 2019, 01:59
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Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds, with the intention to turn in good results in both “bull” and “bear” markets.

(A) with the intention

(B) the intention of which is

(C) intended

(D) and intending

(E) so intended as

https://www.nytimes.com/1988/11/13/business/managing-risks-crash-chastened-investors-seek-to-diversify.html

Asset allocators, whether individuals or professional services, in effect create an all-weather portfolio, often in the form of mutual funds, intended to turn in good results in both bull and bear markets. The purpose is to offset declines in the value of one segment with advances in another.

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Originally posted by tenaman10 on 18 May 2009, 05:21.
Last edited by Bunuel on 06 Apr 2019, 01:59, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 18 Nov 2010, 09:05
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Asset allocators create portfolios, o[strike]ften in the form of mutual funds,[/strike]with the intention to turn in good results in both “bull” and “bear” markets.

To make things clear, let us score out the parenthetical appositive - often in the form of mutual funds – and it will then be clear whether - the intention - modifies portfolios or the allocators. It is indeed modifying the portfolios.

(A) With the intention - with the intention to - is wrong idiom. - Intention of - is the right idiom.
(B) The intention of which is - the intention of which is modifying rightly the portfolios (otherwise why will it say - of which) but the expression is wordy
(C) intended to - perfectly and crisply uses the participle intended to modify the portfolios.
(D) And intending - and intending is a fragment
(E) So intended as - so intended as to – ugly and unidiomatic
C - The clear and crisp choice
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Originally posted by daagh on 18 Nov 2010, 09:03.
Last edited by daagh on 18 Nov 2010, 09:05, edited 1 time in total.
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New post 18 May 2009, 05:31
IMO B

Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds, with the intention to turn in good results in both “bull” and “bear” markets.
(A) with the intention --> with + Noun + to ... is unidiomatic. with + noun phrase or with + noun + that clause are better
(B) the intention of which is -->the best: which correctly modifies for mutual funds, the intention of which is grammatically correct
(C) intended --> intended is wrongly implied in passive for asset allocators
(D) and intending --> ungrammatical parallelism
(E) so intended as -->unidiomatic
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Re: Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2009, 07:21
Minheequang wrote:
IMO B

Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds, with the intention to turn in good results in both “bull” and “bear” markets.
(A) with the intention --> with + Noun + to ... is unidiomatic. with + noun phrase or with + noun + that clause are better
(B) the intention of which is -->the best: which correctly modifies for mutual funds, the intention of which is grammatically correct
(C) intended --> intended is wrongly implied in passive for asset allocators
(D) and intending --> ungrammatical parallelism
(E) so intended as -->unidiomatic


I think the underlined section should modify "portfolios" - the author would use other ways if he wished to modify "mutual funds".
Now, "intended" in C, a past participle, nicely modifies "portfolios".
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Re: Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2010, 20:39
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Hi daagh,
thanks for explanations.

I would like to point out few examples of correct usage of the idiom "intention". The source is Oxford Dictionary:

intention / noun
[C,U] ~ (of doing sth) | ~ (to do sth) | ~ (that...) what you intend or plan to do; your aim:
I have no intention of going to the wedding.
* He has announced his intention to retire.
* It was not my intention that she should suffer.
* He left England with the intention of travelling in Africa.
* I have every intention of paying her back what I owe her.
* The original intention was to devote three months to the project.
* She's full of good intentions but they rarely work out.
* I did it with the best (of) intentions (= meaning to help), but I only succeeded in annoying them.

So I would disagree that the idiom "intention to" is wrong. I think you wanted to say that the way it is used in A is wrong.
For example if it were "Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds, with the intention of turning in good results in both “bull” and “bear” markets." it would be perfectly fine as for me.

Please let me know your thoughts.

thanks.
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New post 18 Nov 2010, 21:55
Pkit
You are perfectly right. In the given context - intention to turn in -does not fit in> Pairwise it may be acceptable as you have clearly made out
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New post 20 Apr 2011, 01:37
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C is better than A because

"Intended" ... verb form... correctly modifies the verb "create".... whereas "with the intension" is wordy, and "intension" in the noun form. According to Manhattan advance sentence correction section convert nouns to verbs to make sentence precise and short
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Re: Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2011, 01:41
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According to me, there are two problems with A.
The major one is that A is changing the implied meaning of the sentence. What is intended to give good results? Portfolios, or asset allocators? Answer is portfolios. A implies that the allocators themselves, not the portfolios, will turn in good results. That doesn't make sense.
Another problem is the idiom- intention of turning in is better than intention to turn in, idiom-wise.
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Re: Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2011, 16:09
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seofah wrote:
Minheequang wrote:
IMO B
Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds, with the intention to turn in good results in both “bull” and “bear” markets.
(A) with the intention --> with + Noun + to ... is unidiomatic. with + noun phrase or with + noun + that clause are better
(B) the intention of which is -->the best: which correctly modifies for mutual funds, the intention of which is grammatically correct
(C) intended --> intended is wrongly implied in passive for asset allocators
(D) and intending --> ungrammatical parallelism
(E) so intended as -->unidiomatic


I think the underlined section should modify "portfolios" - the author would use other ways if he wished to modify "mutual funds".
Now, "intended" in C, a past participle, nicely modifies "portfolios".

This is the key to OA. Nice explanation on the below link:
http://www.manhattangmat.com/forums/pos ... tml#p28192
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Re: Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Mar 2019, 18:27
Hi egmat GMATNinja AjiteshArun

Please suggest why option C is better than option A other than the idiom reason

Thanks
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New post 28 Mar 2019, 19:57
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gmat1393 wrote:
Hi egmat GMATNinja AjiteshArun

Please suggest why option C is better than option A other than the idiom reason

Thanks
With the intention of is far more common than with the intention to, but if we have to use something else, we could go with a meaning call.

1. Option A isn't very clear: it could mean either that portfolios have an intention to turn in good results or that asset allocators have an intention to turn in good results. We now have to ask ourselves whether (a) the allocators want to turn in good results or (b) portfolios are meant to turn in good results. For example:

The engineers created a software package with the intention to help the company's clients track resource utilization.

It's better to associate the desired result with the software package (what is the purpose of the software package?) rather than the engineers who created that package. Otherwise, we are left with just "a software package" in general. And who knows, maybe the engineers were just doing their jobs, and weren't thinking about the company's clients at all while making the program. :)

The engineers created a software package intended to help the company's clients track resource utilization.

2. A portfolio is just a bunch of financial assets. Some portfolios will give us good returns in both types of markets, but others won't. Therefore, it's probably better in this case to talk about asset allocators in general than to talk about portfolios in general.

With the intention... Asset allocators create portfolios.
vs.
Asset allocators create portfolios intended to...

3. Intended is the better way to express this idea. To understand this, let's reword the modifier in C so that the usage of intended is clear:

Asset allocators create portfolios that are intended to turn in good results in both “bull” and “bear” markets.

This is very different from saying that something intended (verb) to do something. The intended to we see in this case is a participle. It means that portfolios are designed to achieve something, not that they have an "intention" to achieve something.

Option C is therefore better from a meaning perspective and is also shorter than the first option.
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Re: Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2019, 09:34
I am not clear as to whether the intention is that of the asset allocators' or the portfolio's? I chose A, believing that it was the asset allocators' intention
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Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 26 Apr 2019, 10:10
tenaman10 wrote:
Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds, with the intention to turn in good results in both “bull” and “bear” markets.

(A) with the intention

(B) the intention of which is

(C) intended

(D) and intending

(E) so intended as

https://www.nytimes.com/1988/11/13/business/managing-risks-crash-chastened-investors-seek-to-diversify.html

Asset allocators, whether individuals or professional services, in effect create an all-weather portfolio, often in the form of mutual funds, intended to turn in good results in both bull and bear markets. The purpose is to offset declines in the value of one segment with advances in another.


I posted for this question one time, but I have not addressed the main points. so, I want to post again.

funds are intended to turn in (get) good result. this sentence is logic. here, the the funds will do "turn in" in the future or in hypothetical action.

but "intention of the funds" is not logic. only persons or animal with some conciousness can have "intention". this is terrible meaning error. choice b is gone.

look at choice a.

"with intention " can refer logically to "allocators". this is good. in the pattern " with intention to do/ with intention of doing", the agent performing to do/doing is the noun before "with". so, inhere allocators will perform "to turn in".

similarly, we can write "my intention to learn gmat is correct". in this pattern, we do not use "with" but "my" and the agent of "to do", a hypothetical future action is made clear.

we do not need to show the agent of hypothetical future action presented by "to do/doing" as in "intention to learn gmat is good". in this sentence, any one can be the agent of "to learn".

come back to choice a of our problem.

"to turn in..." refers to "allocators". this mean "allocators will turn in good results in bull and bear market". this make no sense. the fund not allocators should turn in good results . choice a is wrong

so, we do not care about idiom "intention to do" or "intention of doing" (both of which are in dictionary and we can not confirm which on is correct) . we know that choice a is not logic.

both choices a and b suffer logic error. if we know the idiom "intended to do" normally attached to a noun, we have a higher chance of realizing the meaning errors in choice a and b.

only now, i can realize the meaning error in choice a and b. before , I did not .

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Originally posted by thangvietnam on 06 Apr 2019, 01:54.
Last edited by GMATNinjaTwo on 26 Apr 2019, 10:10, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Apr 2019, 10:14
Thanks AjiteshArun and thangvietnam for the explanations!

Let us know if there are any other doubts.
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Re: Asset allocators create portfolios, often in the form of mutual funds,   [#permalink] 26 Apr 2019, 10:14
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