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Assumption Revision: The popular notion that a tree’s age

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Assumption Revision: The popular notion that a tree’s age  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2015, 21:25
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A
B
C
D
E

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  35% (medium)

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72% (01:09) correct 28% (01:24) wrong based on 335 sessions

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This question is part of the GMAT Club Critical Reasoning : Assumption" Revision Project.

The popular notion that a tree’s age can be determined by counting the number of internal rings in its trunk is generally true. However, to help regulate the internal temperature of the tree, the outermost layers of wood of the Brazilian ash often peel away when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving the tree with fewer rings than it would otherwise have. So only if the temperature in the Brazilian ash’s environment never exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit will its rings be a reliable measure of the tree’s age. Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

• The growth of new rings in a tree is not a function of levels of precipitation.

• Only the Brazilian ash loses rings because of excessive heat.

• Only one day of temperatures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit is needed to cause the Brazilian ash to lose a ring.

• The internal rings of all trees are of uniform thickness.

• The number of rings that will be lost when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit is not predictable.

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Re: Assumption Revision: The popular notion that a tree’s age  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2015, 00:13
1
Pre-thinking:
Conclusion: Number of Rings are reliable only if temperature never exceeds 95F.
Author`s assumption: There is no reliable way to determine tree`s age if temperature exceeds 95F.

After POE got stuck between C and E. So, OA is E in-line with pre-thinking.
C cannot be the assumption because even the temperature reaches the threshold for 2 days, author`s conclusion is valid.
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Re: Assumption Revision: The popular notion that a tree’s age  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2015, 01:14
souvik101990 wrote:
This question is part of the GMAT Club Critical Reasoning : Assumption" Revision Project.

The popular notion that a tree’s age can be determined by counting the number of internal rings in its trunk is generally true. However, to help regulate the internal temperature of the tree, the outermost layers of wood of the Brazilian ash often peel away when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving the tree with fewer rings than it would otherwise have. So only if the temperature in the Brazilian ash’s environment never exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit will its rings be a reliable measure of the tree’s age. Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

• The growth of new rings in a tree is not a function of levels of precipitation.

• Only the Brazilian ash loses rings because of excessive heat.

• Only one day of temperatures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit is needed to cause the Brazilian ash to lose a ring.

• The internal rings of all trees are of uniform thickness.

• The number of rings that will be lost when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit is not predictable.


E for me. If the no of rings lost are predictable, then we can figure out the age of the tree.
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Re: Assumption Revision: The popular notion that a tree’s age  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2015, 04:12
Option E for me.

Kindly post the OE
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New post 01 Feb 2016, 00:03
The popular notion that a tree’s age can be determined by counting the number of internal rings in its trunk is generally true. However, to help regulate the internal temperature of the tree, the outermost layers of wood of the Brazilian ash often peel away when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving the tree with fewer rings than it would otherwise have. So only if the temperature in the Brazilian ash’s environment never exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit will its rings be a reliable measure of the tree’s age. Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

A. The growth of new rings in a tree is not a function of levels of precipitation.

B. Only the Brazilian ash loses rings because of excessive heat.

C. Only one day of temperatures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit is needed to cause the Brazilian ash to lose a ring.

D. The internal rings of all trees are of uniform thickness.

E. The number of rings that will be lost when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit is not predictable.
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Re: CR Revision: The popular notion that a tree’s age can be determined by  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Feb 2016, 02:08
souvik101990 wrote:
The popular notion that a tree’s age can be determined by counting the number of internal rings in its trunk is generally true. However, to help regulate the internal temperature of the tree, the outermost layers of wood of the Brazilian ash often peel away when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving the tree with fewer rings than it would otherwise have. So only if the temperature in the Brazilian ash’s environment never exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit will its rings be a reliable measure of the tree’s age. Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

A. The growth of new rings in a tree is not a function of levels of precipitation.

B. Only the Brazilian ash loses rings because of excessive heat.

C. Only one day of temperatures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit is needed to cause the Brazilian ash to lose a ring.

D. The internal rings of all trees are of uniform thickness.

E. The number of rings that will be lost when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit is not predictable.



A. The growth of new rings in a tree is not a function of levels of precipitation. - Out of Scope

B. Only the Brazilian ash loses rings because of excessive heat. - Not necessary

C. Only one day of temperatures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit is needed to cause the Brazilian ash to lose a ring. -- May not be necessary

D. The internal rings of all trees are of uniform thickness. - May not be necessary

E. The number of rings that will be lost when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit is not predictable. - Ok.

Option: E
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Re: CR Revision: The popular notion that a tree’s age can be determined by  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Feb 2016, 05:30
The contention of the author is that since the outermost layers of the wood of the Brazilian Ash peel away at a temperature above 95 degrees Fahrenheit these rings are not a reliable measure of the tree's age. The author assumes that the loss of the rings are not measurable. Only if the loss is unaccounted for then counting the rings to measure the tree's age will not be a reliable technique. Hence the answer is "E".
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Re: CR Revision: The popular notion that a tree’s age can be determined by  [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2016, 09:31
souvik101990 wrote:
The popular notion that a tree’s age can be determined by counting the number of internal rings in its trunk is generally true. However, to help regulate the internal temperature of the tree, the outermost layers of wood of the Brazilian ash often peel away when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving the tree with fewer rings than it would otherwise have. So only if the temperature in the Brazilian ash’s environment never exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit will its rings be a reliable measure of the tree’s age. Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument above depends?

A. The growth of new rings in a tree is not a function of levels of precipitation.

B. Only the Brazilian ash loses rings because of excessive heat.

C. Only one day of temperatures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit is needed to cause the Brazilian ash to lose a ring.

D. The internal rings of all trees are of uniform thickness.

E. The number of rings that will be lost when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit is not predictable.



Here Conclusion is only if the temperature in the Brazilian ash’s environment never exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit will its rings be a reliable measure of the tree’s age
Rings will be reliable measure----------------------------->environment temp never exceeds 95 deg Fahrenheit
Now think what may be the assumption
if we can count how many no of rings are peeled by some mean so Rings may be a reliable measure

So assumption must be opposite of this
and E says the same
E. The number of rings that will be lost when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit is not predictable.
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Re: Assumption Revision: The popular notion that a tree’s age  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jun 2018, 12:13
conclusion:
So only if the temperature in the Brazilian ash’s environment never exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit will its rings be a reliable measure of the tree’s age.
laymans term - if temp does not exceed 95 F then you can count rings.

negation test: E. The number of rings that will be lost when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit is not predictable.

The number of rings that will be lost when the temperature exceeds 95 degrees Fahrenheit is predictable. (remove not)
this statement contradicts the conclusion the the ring are countable if temp exceed 95 F.
Re: Assumption Revision: The popular notion that a tree’s age &nbs [#permalink] 09 Jun 2018, 12:13
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