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Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!!

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Tuesday Tips: Northwestern Kellogg MBA Essay Tips [#permalink]

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Northwestern University’sKellogg School of Management is a close-knit community that values leadership and teamwork. At the same time, diversity in experience, background and thought is important to the Kellogg admissions committee.

Do your research on the programs, activities, clubs, classes and professors at Kellogg as you approach your essays. While you are reading and conversing with students and alumni, envision how you will contribute to the community.

Kellogg has two mandatory video essays as part of the application process. After you submit your essays you will receive the questions, one of which will focus on Why Kellogg and another will be a general “getting to know you” question. The video essay is an opportunity for the admissions committee to see the person behind the accomplishments you will describe.

Prepare as if you would for an interview, drafting the topics you want to cover and practicing your presentation. The video should accurately portray your personality and demeanor, and extensive preparation will help you be comfortable and be yourself.

Video essays can be daunting, and Stacy Blackman Consulting has developed customized preparation to help you practice for this important component of the application and provide our expert feedback. Contact us to learn more about how we can prepare you for the entire Kellogg application.

Essay 1
Leadership and teamwork are integral parts of the Kellogg experience. Describe a recent and meaningful time you were a leader. What challenges did you face, and what did you learn? (450 words)

This essay focuses on leadership and teamwork using a behavioral essay framework. By seeing the details about exactly what you did and said in your leadership story, Kellogg admissions will understand how you are likely to perform in the future. When approaching this essay spend some time on set up to explain the background, and then use the majority of the space describing specifically what you did, thought, felt and how you behaved.

As the question specifically asks about challenges, it will be useful to show how you have overcome difficulty as a leader or learned from a tough situation. Don’t be nervous about showing weakness here. Every leader has to learn and develop, and willingness to be open to feedback and improve will be an asset to your profile.

Do not neglect mentioning teamwork, which is a core value of Kellogg’s culture. Your leadership experience is likely part of a team at work or in an extracurricular activity, and sensitivity to teamwork and collaboration in any leadership story demonstrates maturity and people skills.

Essay 2
Pursuing an MBA is a catalyst for personal and professional growth. How have you grown in the past? How do you intend to grow at Kellogg? (450 words)

This essay question is a hybrid of a classic career goals essay and a personal essay. Kellogg is interested in candidates who are able to integrate their personal and professional goals and show how a Kellogg MBA will serve both sides of life.

When you describe professional and personal growth in the past, make sure it is relevant to your plans to pursue an MBA at Kellogg. The story you tell in this essay should provide insight into your decision to pursue an MBA and allude to your future goals. Because this isn’t a question about your entire career thus far you can choose just one or two main experiences to share.

The topic of this essay should also be an experience that did show growth over time. Something like starting in an entry level position at work and progressing into a management role comes to mind easily, but also consider something like developing leadership skills over time and personal investment in your career. You could also focus on a passion outside of work that has developed over time and led to personal growth.

Dual-degree Applicants
For applicants to the MMM or JD-MBA dual degree programs, please explain why that program is right for you. (250 words)

Doing your research on Kellogg MBA’s academics and resources will help you answer the question about why you need a dual degree to achieve your goals. If you are applying to the MMM program, you’ll have to show how the degree will prepare you more effectively for your career goals than the MBA alone.

Be able to articulate what is different about the Kellogg MMM program as compared to the MBA and other joint degrees. Know the classes you want to take, the professors you hope to work for, and how the MMM experience will be an asset in your future career.

Similarly, the JD-MBA at Kellogg is a highly competitive admissions process and will require a very clear explanation of what you will do with both degrees after school. Consider the unique attributes of the Kellogg JD-MBA program as compared to others, and also why you specifically need both a JD and an MBA.

Re-Applicants Only
Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (250 word limit)

In answering this question make sure you provide tangible evidence that you have improved the overall package you are submitting this year. Improvements like GMAT score or new quantitative classes are especially tangible, but a promotion, increase in responsibility at work, a job change or even a change of goals and mission can apply.

Additional Information (Optional)
If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (no word count)


If there are any areas of concern, this is the correct place to address them. Strike an upbeat tone here and avoid excuses. Explain your issue clearly and focus most of the essay on the correction for the issue. For example, if you had a disciplinary issue in college, spend most of the essay demonstrating that you learned from the experience and have been an ideal citizen ever since.

Low GPA issues should be explained here, and if there is a grade of C or below on your transcript the admissions committee will want to know why and feel comfortable it is an outlier in your overall academic record. For academic questions make sure you emphasize your improved performance either later in your college career or in subsequent work or classes since college.

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If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Kellogg School Posts Fall 2016 Deadlines, Essay Questions [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2015, 11:09
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The Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University has announced the application deadlines and essay topics for the 2015-2016 admissions season.
Deadlines
Round 1

Application due: September 22, 2015
Decision released: December 16, 2015

Round 2

Application due: January 6, 2016
Decision released: March 23, 2016

Round 3

Application due: April 6, 2016
Decision released: May 11, 2016

Applications are due no later than 5 p.m. CT on the application deadline date. All applicants are considered equally; however, the earlier you apply, the greater chance of accommodating your interview preference. If you’re an international applicant, Kellogg encourages you to apply in Round 1 or 2 to allow time for your visa application.
MBA Essay Questions
  •  Leadership and teamwork are integral parts of the Kellogg experience. Describe a recent and meaningful time you were a leader. What challenges did you face, and what did you learn? (450 words)
  • Pursuing an MBA is a catalyst for personal and professional growth. How have you grown in the past? How do you intend to grow at Kellogg? (450 words)
Certain applicants will respond to additional questions:
  • Dual-degree applicants: For applicants to the MMM or JD-MBA dual degree programs, please explain why that program is right for you. (250 words)
  • Re-applicants: Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (250 word limit)
All applicants have the opportunity to provide explanations or clarification in Additional Information:
  • If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (no word count)

After submitting a completed application, each applicant will be asked to complete two Video Essay Questions. One will be about the candidate’s interest in Kellogg and the other will be a “getting to know you” type of question.

Please look over the instructions on the Kellogg MBA admissions website for detailed information on how to practice for this format.

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If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Kellogg 2016 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2015, 11:34
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In September 2014, Kellogg "rebranded" itself and adopted a more concrete (and in my opinion better) mission statement: "Inspiring growth." The video below explores and clarifies this mission as well as the values Kellogg holds dear. I highly recommend that you watch it to grasp Kellogg's fundamental principles.

A couple of key takeaways from the video: Kellogg seeks individuals who:
• Have a growth mindset (for details, please see Caroline Dweck's Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, one of my favorite books).

• Work well in a collaborative environment while striving to grow individually and at the same time inspiring growth in individuals, organizations, and markets.

Kellogg also changed both its questions this year and #2 certainly reflects the new emphasis on growth.

My tips are in blue below.

Essays:

1.
 Leadership and teamwork are integral parts of the Kellogg experience. Describe a recent and meaningful time you were a leader. What challenges did you face, and what did you learn? (450 words)

First things first: Kellogg is asking for ONE experience. Not more. It also reflects Kellogg's belief that teamwork and leadership go hand-in-hand. Unlike last year's similar essay question, Kellogg is not limiting your professional settings. You do have the option to use a non-professional leadership experience.

 You can use a STAR framework for this response (Situation, Task, Action, Results). Start with the situation and simply describe what was situation/problem/opportunity you were asked to respond to. Then relate your group's task and your responsibility. How did you motivate the others to move in one direction? How did you influence and persuade? Finally what were the results for the group? And what did you learn about leadership, collaboration, and influence?

While it isn't a requirement, and I can imagine instances where this may not be true, examples where you led by virtue of your stature and others' respect for you will be more compelling than those where you led by virtue of station and title.

2.
 Pursuing an MBA is a catalyst for personal and professional growth. How have you grown in the past? How do you intend to grow at Kellogg? (450 words)

This is a difficult question that should provide Kellogg with real insight into the individuals applying to its MBA program. Before responding do your homework on the Kellogg program and what you want to do after you leave Kellogg. The latter will tell you how you want to grow and the former will tell you how you will do so at Kellogg.

First think about the times you have grown either professionally or personally. Which of those instances would you like Kellogg to know about? Ideally the event you choose to focus on will relate in some way to the growth you want to have at Kellogg.

Then reflect on how you intend to grow while at Kellogg. I think this the strong answer to this question will really go beyond mere skill acquisition, although that can be part of your response. How are you going to take advantage of what Kellogg offers to become more like the people in the video: able to see opportunity when faced with challenge, to envision a beautiful finished structure when staring at a bare shell, and to harness your emotional intelligence and acquired skills to lead collaboratively and with clarity of purpose?

Certain applicants will respond to additional questions:

Dual-degree applicants: For applicants to the MMM or JD-MBA dual degree programs, please explain why that program is right for you. (250 words)

A straight-forward response is required here.  What do you want to do that requires both degrees? Why is this joint program the right one to fill in the gaps in your education and take you to a point where you can go down your desired professional path.

Re-applicants: Since your previous application, what steps have you taken to strengthen your candidacy? (250 word limit)

No trick questions here. How are you a better candidate today than when Kellogg rejected you? Have you addressed weaknesses in your previous application? Check out MBA Reapplicant 101 — a lot of (free) resources.

All applicants have the opportunity to provide explanations or clarification in Additional Information:
If needed, use this section to briefly describe any extenuating circumstances (e.g. unexplained gaps in work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent or questionable academic performance, etc.) (no word count)

This is a true optional question If necessary, use it to provide context for possible negatives. Take responsibility for mistakes if necessary and discuss what you have changed so that you don't err in the same way again.

Keep this section short and to-the-point. Don’t be fooled by “No word count.”

Video Essay: 
The Video Essays provide applicants with an additional opportunity to demonstrate what they will bring to our vibrant Kellogg community – in an interactive way. Each applicant will complete two short video essay questions. The questions are designed to bring to life the person we have learned about on paper.

After submitting a completed application, each applicant will be asked to complete two Video Essay Questions. One will be about the candidate’s interest in Kellogg and the other will be a “getting to know you” type of question.

There are 10 practice questions which candidates can complete as many times as they like to get comfortable with the format and technology. The practice questions and experience will simulate the actual video essay experience, so this is meant to be a useful tool and help applicants feel prepared.

There is not an opportunity to re-do the answer to the official video essay questions. We encourage applicants to practice so they are comfortable with the format once it is time to complete the official questions.

Candidates will have 20 seconds to think about their question and up to 1 minute to give their response.

We estimate the Video Essays will take 15-20 minutes to complete – which includes time for set-up and answering all the practice questions.

To prepare for your webcam session, you need to practice for the experience of talking to a video camera with no responses from another human being. For tips on how to prepare and behave during the webcam session, please see Kellogg's "Video Essay" on its Application Components page as well as my Tips for Video MBA Essay Questions.

If you would like professional guidance with your Kellogg MBA application, please consider Accepted’s MBA essay editing and MBA admissions consulting or our  MBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Kellogg application. 

Kellogg 2016 MBA Application Deadlines:

Round     .
Due Date*            .
Decisions Released

Round 1
September 22, 2015
December 16, 2015

Round 2
January 6, 2016
March 23, 2016

Round 3
April 6, 2016
May 11, 2016

*Your application must be received by Kellogg no later than 5p.m. CT on the deadline for the round in which you are applying.

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By Linda Abraham, president and founder of Accepted.com and co-author of the new, definitive book on MBA admissions, MBA Admission for Smarties: The No-Nonsense Guide to Acceptance at Top Business Schools5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your MBA Application Essays [Free Guide]
• 2016 School-Specific MBA Application Essay Tips
• Optional Essays: When and How to Write Them [Short Video]

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Accepted.com's experienced admissions consultants can help you create the most impressive application possible with comprehensive packages, or provide targeted assistance from picking perfect programs to designing a dazzling resumeconstructing engaging essays, or preparing for intense interviews…and more! Accepted.com has guided thousands of applicants to acceptances at top programs since 1994 – we know what works and what doesn't, so contact us to get started now!

Accepted.com    ~ The Premier Admissions Consultancy

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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2015, 01:50
R1 applicant here.
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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In for R1. Excited to start the process

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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2015, 09:58
R1 applicant, good luck all!

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Dean Blount speaks at White House [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2015, 10:29
FROM Kellogg MBA Blog: Dean Blount speaks at White House
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Visiting the White House on Wednesday, Aug. 5, Dean Sally Blount ’92 met with senior advisers and several leaders from the business and business school communities to discuss the changing needs of the 21st century workplace.

That workplace must focus on expanding opportunities for women in business through recruitment, training and retention while implementing policies that work for families, according to Blount, Senior Advisor to the President Valerie Jarrett, and several others.

Telltale signs of this change are already apparent. Streaming video service Netflix recently announced that it would grant unlimited paid leave to employees within the first year of a child’s birth or adoption.

Kellogg also just announced a record-high percentage of female students — 43 percent — in its incoming Full-Time Class of 2017.

“We’ve worked hard on that the last couple of years,” Blount said. “We invest heavily in developing the 21st century workforce and we see that as part of our mission with the strong female leadership that we have.”

Learn more about Dean Blount’s White House visit.

Find out about Kellogg’s Women’s Business Association.

Filed under: Business Insight, Career Tagged: class profile, Dean Blount, leadership, WBA, White House, Women's Business Association Image
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Warmth and competence | MBA Learnings [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2015, 11:00
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FROM Kellogg MBA Blog: Warmth and competence | MBA Learnings
Current student Rohan Rajiv is blogging once a week about important lessons he is learning at Kellogg. Read more of his posts.

We discussed the tension between “warmth and competence” in the first week of classes at school.

The HBR article that the chart below appears in has an apt title – “Connect, then Lead.” The thesis is: start with warmth and prioritize demonstrating warmth over competence. High warmth and high competence inspires admiration, while low warmth and high competence inspires envy and other negative emotions.

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Source: HBR (https://hbr.org/2013/07/connect-then-lead)

Academics have used this concept in various ways to show how various cultural/demographic/occupational groups are perceived in various parts of the world. As usual, I’m going to gloss over all that and focus on the implications for you and me.

I’ve been retrospectively examining how I’ve been doing on warmth vs. competence. And I’ve found that I’ve failed a lot more than I’ve succeeded.

As you’ve probably realized, the point here is not “admiration.” Being warm is just the right thing to do in most cases. However, I’ve realized I fail at this simply because behaving this way isn’t just a matter of wanting to. The fakers might disagree, but there’s always a fake-your-way-to solution to most problems in the short run. In the long run, I believe getting to warmth is a journey that accurately represents our progress in our journey to true self confidence.

My thesis is that it takes true self confidence to begin with warmth. Observing myself, I see a clear trend – I become myself as time passes in an interaction. However, in the early stages (e.g. the first 10 minutes), I subconsciously choose to lead with competence. That’s definitely because leading with competence placates my insecurities and makes me feel at ease. As momentum builds and a sense of ease builds up, I get over those insecurities and move into the confidence zone. Sometimes it only takes a minute to make this switch. Other times, it takes up to ten. But the pattern is there to see.

The only good piece of progress I can report is that I am becoming increasingly aware of it. And as I become aware of it, I find that it becomes easier to get to that state of ease.

Rohan Rajiv just completed his first year in Kellogg’s Full-Time Two-Year Program. Prior to Kellogg he worked at a-connect serving clients on consulting projects across 14 countries in Europe, Asia, Australia and South America. He blogs a learning every day, including his MBA Learnings series, on www.ALearningaDay.com.

Filed under: Academics, Student Life Tagged: competence, life lessons, MBA Learnings, warmth Image
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2015, 20:53
Hi Everyone!

I am also looking forward to applying for R1, however im not quite sure if i will be a good fit at Kellogg. I have a GMAT score of 680 and 5 years of work experience in IT in the financial sector and want to make a complete industry and function change to marketing. Any thoughts if i'd be aiming to high by considering Kellogg?

Hoping for an honest opinion :D

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Upcoming Webinar: A Conversation with Kellogg’s Director of Admissions [#permalink]

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FROM Kellogg MBA Blog: Upcoming Webinar: A Conversation with Kellogg’s Director of Admissions
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Have you ever wanted to know insider tips on applying to Kellogg? Want to know how to make your application stand out?

If you answered yes to either of these questions, then you won’t want to miss Wednesday’s webinar with the Kellogg Admissions team. “Applying to Kellogg – A conversation with the Director of Admissions,” is scheduled to begin at noon (CDT) on Wednesday, Aug. 12. Beth Tidmarsh, director of admissions for Kellogg’s Full-Time program, will host the conversation and provide advice on the application process.

Register for the webinar

In the meantime, take a look at her previous blog series’ about applying to Kellogg:

Learn more about Kellogg’s Full-Time MBA program.

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Discovering the many faces of innovation [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2015, 09:00
FROM Kellogg MBA Blog: Discovering the many faces of innovation
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By Ahalya Vijay

Did you know that Candy Crush brings in almost $1 million in revenue every single day? By comparison, Angry Birds earns $10,000 per day. Angry Birds innovated from a product perspective, but Candy Crush pushed all the right buttons to drive customer behavior in its favor.

Also, did you know that Uber’s business model is not product innovation? Uber’s fee-based model has been used by transportation and logistics companies like Maersk since the 1960s. Uber innovated by integrating existing elements into one seamless ‘ecosystem’ – it created a platform where independent drivers could communicate directly with customers on the street. And it made this platform available in each person’s pocket.

These are just a few of the interesting insights learned from Doblin co-founder Larry Keeley during a class visit to the global innovation firm’s Chicago offices. Keeley also teaches Innovation Frontiers, a core course in Kellogg’s MMM program.

The topic that afternoon was, quite simply, a crash course on what innovation looks, feels, tastes, smells and sounds like.

While most people think of innovation as mostly product-focused, Keeley used the above examples to discuss a 10-part innovation model that Doblin has developed. Product-focused innovation is a disruptive change, often resulting from a radical shift in technology that involves patenting a new product. Product innovations are easily ‘copiable,’ though, and often at a lower price point.

Keeley emphasized that successes like Uber were drawn out of multi-part innovations – disruptive changes that touch multiple components of the 10-part innovation model that result in the formation of a new ecosystem. For instance, consider the first ever Ford car. While it was a definitely an example of product innovation, positive cash flows continued to be a problem until Henry Ford launched channel and profit model innovations by selling to car dealers instead of directly to customers.

Interested in where this is going? We were too.

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After learning how multi-faceted innovation could be, we split up into teams to ‘get our feet wet’ by designing an innovative new product or service, while at the same time thinking about more than just the actual product.

I guess we were all quite inspired by the session, because after 20 minutes the room came up with five amazing, yet viable, game-changing ideas. My team was quite jazzed up by the whole process, and we are even thinking of taking things a step further on our idea (which integrates philanthropy and retail to help donators feel more connected to those whose lives they are changing – that’s all I’m saying for now!).

The visit ended with a tour of Doblin’s offices. It’s interesting how Doblin has subverted the typical office set-up with a few rooms to facilitate teamwork and hotelling desks called “home bases” that encourage directors to sit next to consultants. They also have micro-kitchens (a la Google) with a delicious range of coffee. Another interesting feature is the main room in which they have client meetings – all furniture is on wheels making it easy to change the set-up of the room, and the room is partitioned into three sections by curtains to walk clients through Doblin-created solutions.

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All in all, our visit was eye-opening. Through the innovation process, I learned more about my fellow classmates and what they are passionate about. Personally I learned the importance of taking a different approach to innovation, a critical component of several courses, projects and activities that we will do as MMM students over the next two years.

Learn more about Kellogg’s MMM program.

Ahalya Vijay is a first-year student in the MMM program at Kellogg. Prior to Kellogg, she did education consulting work with the South African government and technology/operations consulting across the US and Canada.

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Making the most of your first year in an MBA program | MBA Learnings [#permalink]

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FROM Kellogg MBA Blog: Making the most of your first year in an MBA program | MBA Learnings
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First-year student Rohan Rajiv is blogging once a week about important lessons he is learning at Kellogg. Read more of his posts here.

A few months ago, I wrote a letter to an incoming MBA student in an attempt to help incoming students prepare for their two years at school. I tried staying away from specific advice in that post, as the assumption was that the framework ought to work for everyone.

Today, however, I’m going to dig into my first year process and provide specifics on how I spent my first year.

Given the MBA is a $200,000 investment (not counting opportunity costs in lost income), at this time last year I was very curious about any specific “process” advice. And I was generally left disappointed as most of the advice I found online was the in the “feels-good-but-useless” category – e.g. find your passion, build great relationships, travel, dream, take risks, etc.

This post has a lot of inherent personal bias as it is what worked for me, so please take these notes with healthy doses of salt. And, yes, this will be long and dense, but I hope you find it worthwhile.

As I outlined in the previous post, there are six priorities at business school: academics, career, extracurriculars, social, framily (close friends and family) and you. I’ll go through what I’ve learned as I’ve approached these at school.

1. Academics
a) Finding classes
  • Make a plan

    I spent four hours during winter break going through every course that I’d be interested in. After making the list, I tallied all feedback I’d received about professors whose classes I should take. I went about creating a rough two-year plan. I haven’t stuck to it. But as always, the act of making a roadmap helped a lot.
  • Understand historical bidding statistics

    We have a bidding system, so I spent time understanding the points spent on the course-in-question in the past and also looked at the average rating of the professor. With this data, I could easily spot the over-valued and under-valued courses. My takeaway – use data where possible and invest in understanding the system.
  • Ask for recommendations

    Early on, I asked most second-years I met for top course recommendations. This helped a lot.
b) Attending classes
  • Show up

    I think I missed just two classes through the year. That helped a lot.
  • Be 100% present

    My natural ADD makes it difficult to keep focus throughout a class. So I worked out a simple forcing mechanism – sit in front. This helped ensure I didn’t spend my time mucking around on my phone or laptop and also ensured I fed off the professor’s energy. This worked most of the time, and that’s what I was shooting for.
  • Come prepared and participate

    This is part of the “be 100% present” idea. Participation is an extension of that. Now, I think I was far better prepared in my Fall quarter than later quarters. After the first couple of weeks, I began getting a sense of the level of depth required and that helped me calibrate.
c) Group meetings
  • Align on expectations if possible

    It is always helpful to have a conversation upfront if you feel there might be misalignment on goals and priorities. I can think of a couple of experiences when having this conversation would have helped.
  • Don’t count group meetings as study time

    This is the same concept as work meetings – use this for discussion, agreement and decisions. Don’t count it as solo study time. Bring value to a group meeting (very hard to do sometimes).
  • No need to be the lead in every group

    Continuing of the previous thread, if you find others taking the lead in some groups, let them. Just make sure you do the same in another group.
d) Preparing for exams
  • Think about whether you need the textbook

    I didn’t use textbooks, but I know of people who did. So this might be true just be me. I found the course pack and readings to be more than sufficient.
  • Attend review sessions only if absolutely necessary

    I went to very few. When I did, I often chose a video as you can skip through most parts.
  • 30 hours

    I found that roughly 30 hours of study per course was sufficient to grasp the concepts and do well. This is roughly three hours per week. But for most people, you see spikes toward the end of the quarter.
  • Summarize lectures – single best learning

    My strategy professor suggested we spend time after every class summarizing what we learnt. I’d read about this technique earlier and never tried it. While I didn’t strictly do it every class/week, I made sure I did it every time I studied. This typically happened when an assignment was due – the assignment naturally required knowledge of what had been taught in the prior couple of weeks. So, instead of diving into the answers of the assignment, I’d go back and make sure I summarized lectures first. This was an amazing move as it made it easier to make my notes to review before the exam. And in exams where we were only allowed a cheat sheet, it made the process of creating the cheat sheet really simple.
2. Career
I’ve covered my process in detail in lessons learned from internship recruiting. I just have two adds:

  • Don’t view classmates as competition

    Be of help to each other. We grow up conditioned to compete. Think of your classmates as temporary “path sharers.” Be nice to each other.
  • Start a prep group

    We had a four-person tech group that met nearly every week for 10 weeks. It was one of the best things we did.
3. Extracurriculars
  • Understand why you’re doing extracurriculars

    Different people do these for different reasons. Some career switchers like adding a note to their resume about a relevant professional club. Some want to test leadership. Some others want to meet people. There are many reasons to do them. My reasons were straightforward – I am driven by people, learning and impact. Extracurriculars have helped work on ideas that combine all three. They’re a fantastic opportunity to learn more about yourself, how you lead, how you work in teams, etc. I spend a significant amount of time on extracurriculars and it has been a highlight of my school experience.
  • Don’t be a flake

    Once you commit to a leadership role, keep up that commitment. It is not just because everyone remembers flakes or because all those people you work with might have a strong say in a future career opportunity. It simply is the right thing to do.
  • If you’re unable to do work, communicate and apologize

    It’s the worst case scenario, but it happens.
  • Run good team meetings

    Most team members hate team meetings. That’s because they’re generally run badly. I’ve tried hard to run good team meetings – this means preparing hard, using the time meaningfully and following up. I’ve tried to set the norm of 100% participation early on and have tried to earn my team members’ time. It is a really useful skill to learn and hone.
  • Learn how to build great teams with peers

    The best part about school is you work on projects with peers. If you can learn how to build high functioning teams with peers who’re only doing this out of personal motivation, I believe you can build great teams everywhere. Working on teams to lead the incoming student orientation week, our technology club and two other initiatives has been an education in itself.
4. Social
This is heavily biased as it comes from the point of view of an introvert.

  • Look to build long-term relationships, not network

    Building long term relationships take time. So take the time and be patient.
  • Invest in really getting to know as many people as you can

    One of my wiser friends once said business school is where you’ll meet the highest proportion of people who are both interesting and interested in you. It is very true. In my case, I’ve tried setting up three or four coffee conversations every week. They aren’t ever over coffee. Every time I meet someone who I’d like to get to know better, I just put some time on their calendar (typically between classes), walk with them and swap stories. Many of these just turn out to be one-time meetings but some become really nice relationships. As with these things, it takes two hands to clap.
  • Maximize high quality social events

    Hanging out with 100 people in a bar is what I term a “low quality” social event. Any time you meet people and talk about the weather is low quality as well. One-on-one or small group conversations that involve talking about things that matter to you are high quality. I maximize those.
  • For low quality social events, “HELL YEAH!” or no

    If it isn’t a “HELL YEAH!”, I don’t show up.  (I did warn you this is very introvert biased).
  • Find ways to meet random people

    It is easy to shut off and find your own clique. I created an open event for my entire class last quarter on a Friday evening. Twelve people showed up, a few of whom I’d never spoken to. That was a win. This a good reminder to do more of those.
5. Framily
My past life was outside the US. So most of these notes are directed to staying in touch with family and friends who live far away.

  • Hang out with family when working/doing chores

    I do a lot of conversations with family over breakfast, dish washing and other such chores. Thanks to FaceTime, it is really easy to prop Mom up on the desk while I’m doing other work. We’ve spoken a lot more during school days (as I often have flexible schedules) as a result.
  • Set aside time on Saturday morning to catch up with friends

    While I wasn’t the most proactive friend in the fall quarter, I always made sure I had time set aside on Saturday mornings for catch up calls. That helped a lot.
  • Work on projects with people who matter and/or set up recurring calls

    My friends and I work on a charity together. That means we catch up every two weeks, and that helps a lot. Every few months, we set up a big Google Hangout as an extension to our bi-weekly call. In a couple of special cases, I set up recurring calls.
6. You
This is the single most important priority. Nothing matters more. If you’re not taking care of yourself, you’re likely doing it wrong.

  • I count my wife in this priority

    It helps me prioritize time with her. I don’t do nearly as good a job as I’d like to. But I work hard on it as it is the single hardest challenge I’ve faced in school.
  • A 5:15 a.m. – 9:15 p.m. routine on weekdays really helps

    As my wife leaves for work in the morning, I generally sync with her. So, this means I’m up by 5:15 a.m., do my morning routine and get ready until 7 a.m. I count 7 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. as my work day and plan study, activities and meetings between these slots. I’m generally back by 6 p.m., and we either head to the gym or go for a run around 6:15 p.m. Then we have dinner together. I try not to touch work or email after 7 p.m. I don’t do nearly as well I’d like to. But we do go to sleep by 9:30 p.m. or so. This means social nights are rare. But you’ve got to make trade-offs, and I’ve generally prioritized time with my wife.
  • Own your calendar

    I generally schedule all my group meeting and catch up invites. This helps me allow for blocks of time to do work and also ensures I don’t take any meetings after 6 p.m. I’ve only had to make exceptions about four times in the year. That’s not bad at all.
  • Chill on Saturday afternoons and evenings and plan social stuff on Fridays

    I try hard to switch off on Saturdays as Sunday is typically a full work day since assignments tend to be due on Monday. It doesn’t always happen, but I try very hard to keep Saturdays free to just hang out at home with my wife. So that means I try and plan social stuff on Fridays so we both can participate.
  • Sleep eight hours, meditate, eat healthy and exercise

    Being disciplined about the rest of my life has meant I haven’t really had to compromise on this. There have been times when I’ve slept less than I’d like. But all in all, I’ve tried to keep a normal routine, including blogging every morning of course :)
  • Optimize for energy

    There were, of course, many lousy days when I felt really low on energy. On these days, I generally aimed to go to sleep as early as possible and do less during the day. My productivity is generally twice the normal amount on good energy days. And I generally optimized for this.
So what does this all mean in terms of time spent?
I thought I’d show what all of these notes looked like in action. I’ve written about this a few times, but aside from just recording meetings, I generally record productive time on my calendar. If I’ve spent 90 minutes studying but felt like I did 60 minutes of  productive work, I generally store that on my calendar. At the end of the week, I add up the time spent on each priority and look at how I spent my week. It is always very illuminating. Over time, I added more nuance – e.g. tracking group time vs. solo study time, etc. As I could go on about this topic for hours, I thought I’d share two graphs and what they mean.

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These two graphs show how I spent time in the year. I don’t track time spent with framily or with wife/myself. This is strictly for the “work” part of my life. It is an approach that’s added incredible value considering the time investment (roughly 30 minutes per week). I’ve continued to do this in my internship and it is among the better things I do. A few notes:

  • Both graphs have the same data – the top graph is a 100% graph while the bottom is in absolute hours.
  • F1 = 1st week in the Fall quarter. W = Winter, S = Spring
  • As you can see, my internship search ended Week 6 of the winter quarter and nearly all of that time got replaced by extracurriculars (and a little bit more social – but not much more)
  • I generally get about 35 “productive” hours in a week. This number assumes meetings are productive. I try to make sure they are. But, of course, this is chainsaw art and not fine – it is granular enough to work for my purposes.
  • My academic numbers don’t include 12 hours spent in classes. I take that as a base-case.
  • As you can see, my academic hours spike around Weeks 9 and 10. I spent a lot more time studying in the fall. I took three courses (one less than the usual four-course load) in the winter – even so, I didn’t study all that much in the winter.
  • I have some more nuanced stats but won’t spend any more time on this. I geek out on this stuff, and I recognize that it isn’t for everyone.
  • I have written a lot about prioritization in school. And, hopefully, this brings those ideas to life.
Finally, since this post is all about my personal advice, I’d like to finish with three ideas I’ve found useful:

1. Spend energy and time on things you value or consider important.
The first step here is to determine which of these priorities matter to you. Academics, for example, clearly matter to me. It doesn’t for everyone. But understanding what matters to you is the first step to allocating your energy and time – your most valuable resources. Everyone who goes to a decent program will tell you that it often gets overwhelming. I think of it as preparation for life as a business leader. If you walk out of school having learned to prioritize things that matter, that’s a great lesson to learn.

2. You can’t win them all.
Business school can often feel like high school. You can easily spend hours worrying about your popularity, social standing and/or what you are missing out on (a.k.a FOMO or fear of missing out). The first step here is to acknowledge that school is the same as life – you aren’t going to get along with everyone and not everyone’s going to like you. That’s OK. Just be yourself. Everyone else is taken.

3. No one owes you anything.
It is tempting to walk in thinking that the school owes you a great experience for the fees you paid, that your group mates owe you for your selfless dedication, and so on. I think a better way to approach this is to just remind yourself that nobody owes you anything. You’re in a great environment that you can mold to suit your needs and style. That, in itself, is a great opportunity.

Like all good things, your experience is what you make of it.

Make it meaningful.

Make it count.

Rohan Rajiv is a first-year student in Kellogg’s Full-Time Two-Year Program. Prior to Kellogg he worked at a-connect serving clients on consulting projects across 14 countries in Europe, Asia, Australia and South America. He blogs a learning every day, including his MBA Learnings series, on www.ALearningaDay.com.

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Free lunch and ping pong don’t make a culture [#permalink]

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FROM Kellogg MBA Blog: Free lunch and ping pong don’t make a culture
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By Raymond Hwang

This post also appears on LinkedIn.

I never wanted to be one of those people that took pictures of their food and texted it to others. But while interning at LinkedIn this summer, I became one of them. It started slowly … a picture here to my family, a picture there to my classmates. But soon my addiction to culinary-related sharing was out of control. Everyone had to know about the sushi I ate for lunch, all playfully captioned with “did I mention it’s free?”

Such a shameless parading of perks is fun, especially when you work in technology for the summer. But when does the glossy finish of “free” begin to fade? The answer is quickly. Free lunches and ping pong alone do not create a culture — at least not a great one and not by default. I’ll give you three reasons why that’s the case.

1. Entitlement aka “I hate how used to this I am”

When I first arrived at LinkedIn, I was thrilled by the arcade games, foosball, and the quality (and quantity) of food. I laughed condescendingly when I first heard someone say to me “the lunch today is terrible.” I swore those words would never come from my mouth. After all, who complains about free lunch? Well, the answer is me. I complain about free lunch. As of last week after a “below-average” lunch, I have officially joined the entitled club. Unfortunately, the norm, no matter how wonderful, quickly becomes ordinary. For better or worse that’s human nature, and if you expect the perks alone to cause you to skip joyfully to work each morning, you’re in for an unpleasant surprise.

2. Perk escalation aka “Everyone else is doing it”

The thing about the tech industry is that top companies are in a constant battle for top talent. As such, when one firm begins offering a perk, pressure is immediately placed on others to offer something similar in order to maintain parity and continue to attract the best people. Maybe those free yoga lessons means the company is dedicated to your wellness, or maybe it’s just that they’re trying to keep pace.

3. Presence vs. presents aka “Let’s buy him an iPhone and call it a day”

As a kid I was lucky to have wonderfully caring parents. But I had friends whose parents were largely absent and to compensate they would buy their kids the coolest toys. I was jealous at the time but looking back I was quite fortunate. From what I’ve seen in parenting, presence matters much more than presents. A similar principle holds true here. I have friends and classmates who are interning at wonderfully sexy companies with perks aplenty who honestly hate their jobs. A great sushi station can only go so far in making your 14-hour day and crappy team bearable.

So if not perks, what makes a good culture? Well perhaps it’s best to first take a step back and define “culture.” I love Jellyvision Founder Harry Gottlieb’s definition of culture as “the sum of all interactions between employees and customers.” In short, culture is a byproduct of consistent behavior from every member of the firm. In LinkedIn’s words, it’s “the collective personality of an organization,” and like people, that personality can be vicious, caring, exciting, and so on.

So what is it like at LinkedIn?

All of this brings me to my summer at LinkedIn. The perks are aplenty here — just ask my parents and annoyed friends. But while I’m beyond thankful for the many perks that surround me, what I’ve enjoyed most, and what I believe truly sets this company apart, is a culture that is compellingly authentic and joyfully modeled by the employees of this company.

Here at LinkedIn we have a codified culture statement and a set of values. While those can be empty words in other organizations, it works here because senior leadership didn’t sit in a board room, define our culture, and then announce it from a stage. The culture and values of the company were defined bottoms up, then incentivized against, hired against and fired against. Leadership is committed to our culture, models it day in and day out, and the vast majority of the employees I’ve worked with do as well.

Personally, relationships matter came to life for me when this summer my family went through a difficult season and my manager, director, and HR all worked together to give me time off and make sure I prioritized family. Our members come first proved to be more than a platitude when in several meetings I saw leaders decide not to move forward with an additional monetization option because it would hurt the user experience. Take intelligent risks was displayed when one of my projects as an intern was presented, operationalized, and launched in less than two months. The wonderful thing is, there are plenty more examples I could give.

Culture is either reinforced each day or eroded each day. Each small, seemingly minor, individual act adds up to a much greater whole that becomes a company’s culture. Perhaps that’s why act like an owner is also one of our values. Each day, every employee can act like a founder and decide to grow a spectacular culture or simply take without giving.

My encouragement to those seeking new opportunities in the near-future is to find a place where culture is not lip-service; a place where you not only enjoy the culture, but can imagine enthusiastically helping to grow it; a place not just about perks but about people. In my opinion, that’s what truly matters most in the end.

P.S. Please don’t take free lunch and ping pong away.

Learn more about Kellogg’s Two-Year MBA program.

Raymong Hwang is currently a second-year student in Kellogg’s Two-Year MBA Program. While at LinkedIn he is interning on the Product Marketing team. At Kellogg he is a leader in both the Marketing Club and High Tech Club. Prior to Kellogg, Raymond worked at General Mills in a cross-functional rotational program.

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KWEST: A truly ‘amazing’ experience [#permalink]

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By Kyle Burr

Nearly 1,000 participants. Five continents. More than 40 countries.

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to KWEST.

KWEST – Kellogg Worldwide Experience and Service Trip – is an institution among Kellogg MBA students. Each year more than 85% of the school’s incoming class and their significant others (referred to as “Joint Ventures” or “JVs”) embark on a weeklong adventure to countries all over the world. This year’s KWEST kicks off in less than a week, with students departing to a variety of destinations, from China and Portugal to Argentina and the Galapagos Islands, and many places in between.

Each trip consists of 20 incoming students and JVs, and is usually led by five rising second-year students. As per its namesake, KWEST participants not only spend the week building friendships with their new classmates, but also dedicate part of their time to community service activities in the countries they visit.

Designed to build camaraderie prior to the upcoming fall academic quarter, KWEST is often the first impression of Kellogg for incoming students, and frequently results in the formation of lasting friendships that persevere long beyond their time in Evanston.

By tradition, participants are asked not to share any personal information revealing:

  • Their hometown
  • Their undergraduate alma mater
  • Their work history prior to Kellogg
  • The city they most recently lived in
While this can make conversation a bit more challenging, the intent is to foster deeper, more meaningful dialogue. Toward the end of the trip, each person is asked to share this information during the “Big Reveal” – a highlight of the week that often leads to a number of surprises and shocking revelations!

In addition to providing a vast array of exotic locales, the portfolio of KWEST trips is intended to provide the style of travel and leisure (or lack thereof) that suits the needs and interests of everyone.

As an incoming student last year, I had the opportunity to participate in what is likely the most polarizing of all trips – KWEST Amazing Race! Simultaneously the most coveted and intentionally evaded of the options available, this trip attracts a certain kind of individual that is spontaneous, comfortable with an extreme amount of ambiguity and willing to place their full trust in the hands of a few similarly adventurous strangers.

Inspired by the eponymous hit TV series, “KWEST AR” participants are at the complete whim of their second-year student leaders. We had absolutely no idea where we were headed on a day-by-day basis – including our initial destination!

Once we arrived in a city, we were split into five teams of four students, each led by a second-year leader. Just like the television show, we were given a series of clues, with each leading to a different site in that particular city or we received a team challenge to be solved on the spot. Without the aid of Internet devices, teams relied on [hopefully] friendly locals that [with any luck] spoke English and could correctly point us in the right direction. Each “race” typically lasted three to four hours and could cover more than 10 miles on foot!

The next day, we got up, traveled to a new city – often in a new country – and did the whole thing all over again! Last year took us to Bucharest, Romania; Sofia, Bulgaria; Istanbul, Turkey; and Antalya, Turkey.

While it is surely an unorthodox way to see the world, it is unquestionably an unforgettable experience. Which is why I am leading it this year! Stay tuned in the coming weeks when I will reveal the details of this year’s trip after we return to the US.

Other “special trips” include:

  • KWEST Mystery – Similar to Amazing Race (but without the race part), participants are not told their destination country until they arrive. Typically more “off-the-beaten path” locales, last year’s destinations were Fiji and Samoa.
  • KWEST Top Chef – Introduced for the first time in 2015, participants will compete in a series of competitive cooking activities while immersing themselves in local cuisine. This year’s destination is Peru!
  • Tour de KWEST – A storied tradition, participants spend the week cycling across a country! Last year’s group went to the Netherlands, and this year’s group is headed to France.
  • Hiking Excursions – Some trips place a strong emphasis on outdoor activities, and this year two trips have incorporated some serious mountain terrain into their itineraries. One group is heading to the Bavarian Alps, while another will be trekking in Switzerland.
  • Short Trips – Intended for individuals with conflicts on either end of the normal KWEST schedule, these trips either leave on Monday or return on Friday to accommodate extenuating circumstances.
  • KWEST Chicago – For those unable or uninterested in traveling internationally and looking to fully immerse themselves in their new surroundings!
  • KWEST Family – Designed for incoming students with children, this trip usually heads to a nearby destination in Wisconsin or Michigan for family-friendly activities and vacationing.
As I mentioned above, community service is an important part of the KWEST experience. The students on KWEST Jordan, for example, will be volunteering in a Syrian refugee camp and school, while the Tour de KWEST participants will help restore a historic reservoir in the Loire Valley.

For thousands of current and former students and JVs, KWEST was a foundational part of their Kellogg experience – and an adventure most will never forget. More than just a “last hoorah” before hitting the books in September, it is often the beginning of a journey that will continue after they’ve left Evanston behind.

Trip leaders play an integral role in this process by cultivating the right group dynamic, dealing with unforeseen circumstances, and ensuring that all goes smoothly during the week. However, in most cases their influence extends far beyond the KWEST week itself. KWEST leaders often form the underlying fabric of Kellogg’s informal peer-to-peer mentoring network, serving as advisors and role models to first-year students long into the school year.

In that spirit, I look forward to meeting the next cadre of KWEST Amazing Racers and continuing the legacy of my own leaders and many before them.

Kyle Burr is a member of the 10-person, student-run KWEST Executive Committee. Prior to Kellogg, he was a management consultant working for governments, non-profits and social enterprises in Washington, D.C., Swaziland and Uganda. This summer he interned as an Associate Brand Manager with the Kraft Heinz Company outside Chicago.

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What I learned at the BCG Northeast Women’s Conference [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2015, 08:00
FROM Kellogg MBA Blog: What I learned at the BCG Northeast Women’s Conference
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Amanda McCarthy, left, with fellow Kellogg student and BCG intern Kate Mann.

By Amanda McCarthy

As part of my summer internship with the Boston Consulting Group (BCG), I recently attended BCG’s 2015 Northeast Women’s Initiative Conference in NYC. The day was geared specifically toward associates, consultants and women like me who are spending a summer interning with the firm.

The morning kicked off with an amazing presentation by Dr. Heidi Grant Halvorson on the benefits of a “Get Better” mindset. Citing research study after study to a room full of data lovers (myself included), Halvorson explained why we should all avoid a “Be Good” mindset – one where we are constantly attempting to prove ourselves and outperform others. Instead, we should embrace a “Get Better” mindset, where we always perceive ourselves as having more to learn. This allows us to embrace risk and be less afraid of failure, a key to professional success.

One of the points Halvorson made that stuck with me the most was that bright women are more likely to have a “Be Good” mindset. That made me really take time to think about whether I embrace a “Get Better” mindset, and if I don’t, how it could negatively affect my own career journey.

It was really inspiring to have the day to step away from work, to learn, reflect and share thoughts with hundreds of other career-driven women at the firm who, like me, are still at a relatively early stage of their careers.

Kate Mann, a fellow Kellogg student and summer consultant with BCG, echoed my thoughts when she described her reaction to the event:

“What I appreciated most about the conference was that it was tailored for women specifically at the associate / consultant levels,” Mann said. “The panels and Q&A were focused on topics that impact and interest those of us still in the earlier stages of our careers, and made for a much more relevant day of learning than a one-size-fits all conference.

“I thought the networking and post-internship panels led by more senior consultants, though not tailored specifically to women, were really strengthened by the opportunity to meet, network and learn with women at our same level from around the Northeast.”

BCG is one example, but it’s nice to know that many employers where Kellogg students plan to work are investing in the development of women — and diversity more broadly — at their firms. All in all it was a great day, and I look forward to talking more about it with my fellow Kellogg students when I get back to campus in a few weeks!

Amanda McCarthy is a rising second-year student in Kellogg’s Full-Time Two-Year MBA program. She serves as a Director of Marketing for the WBA. Prior to Kellogg, Amanda worked in media and marketing research in NYC, and spent this past summer at Boston Consulting Group’s NYC office.

Filed under: Business Insight, Student Life Tagged: BCG, Consulting, internship, life lessons, summer internship, WBA, Women's Business Association Image
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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In for R2!

Looking forward to meeting some Kellogg folks tomorrow at the admission event in Houston.

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A better way to evaluate performance | MBA Learnings [#permalink]

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Second-year student Rohan Rajiv is blogging once a week about important lessons he is learning at Kellogg. Read more of his posts here.

Incentives drive behavior. Our “Leadership in Organizations” professor repeatedly stated that incentives are among the strongest levers to changing culture.

As we discussed incentive systems, we discussed the issues with the traditional tier-based evaluation systems.

Most companies have some variant of a system that grades people above or below target/expectations relative to their peers. We discussed a couple of issues with this:

  • Peer-based evaluation systems often lead to unhealthy competition.
  • Telling someone they were really close to the next tier actually causes a lot of unhappiness. Our professor did research on Olympic medal winners and found that silver medalists were more unhappy than bronze medalists. While the bronze folks were just happy to be on stage, the silver folks were generally unhappy at missing the elusive gold.
So what’s an alternative solution?

We discussed a 100-point scale with 20 questions scored for five points each. These 20 questions could be divided into four areas – e.g. task performance, leadership, culture and teamwork. Each question would drive to specific questions about how a team member performed. Of course, the manager(s) would need to substantiate each question with clear examples.

Why would this be better?

  • First, it eliminates tier regret. Your yearly evaluation is a score out of a 100.
  • Second, it focuses competition against yourself. The relevant question here is, how did I do versus my performance last year?
  • Third, it encourages self reflection and alignment. Each employee should do a self evaluation and compare notes and points of difference with their managers.
  • And finally, it provides more granular feedback on performance versus a couple of letters and bullet points.
We discussed this almost a year ago, and it is clearly one of those discussions that has stuck with me. I’ve been looking for counter points nearly every time I’ve thought about it. And I’m yet to find too many.

So, here’s to giving it a try … someday.

Rohan Rajiv is a second-year student in Kellogg’s Full-Time Two-Year Program. Prior to Kellogg he worked at a-connect serving clients on consulting projects across 14 countries in Europe, Asia, Australia and South America. He blogs a learning every day, including his MBA Learnings series, on www.ALearningaDay.com.

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My One-Year experience: An interactive timeline [#permalink]

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Shannon Holly knew she wanted an MBA to advance her professional development, but she didn’t want to commit the time to a two-year program. That’s when she discovered Kellogg’s Full-Time One-Year MBA Program.

Instantly, she was hooked.

During her year in the program, Shannon took full advantage of the Kellogg experience. She majored in three different subjects, won the annual Kellogg Marketing Competition, traveled to South Africa to study challenges facing the education industry, joined an ’80s cover band and much, much more.

Tour Shannon’s interactive timeline to see how she shaped her Kellogg experience and how you can shape yours.

Filed under: Academics, Career, Student Life Tagged: alumni, dak, day at kellogg, finance, GIM, Global Initiatives in Management, graduation, housing, kwest, leadership, marketing, marketing competition, One-year, One-Year MBA Program, strategy Image
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2015, 00:17
emwinn wrote:
In for R2!

Looking forward to meeting some Kellogg folks tomorrow at the admission event in Houston.


emwinn, How did the Houston admission event go? Could you please share with us excerpts from the event?
Thank you in advance!
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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!! [#permalink]

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Kellogg Interview Questions

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Kellogg is somewhat unique in that it allows anyone who applies to interview. Kellogg MBA interviews are typically off-campus with an alumnus, although it is also possible to interview with an admissions committee member on campus or over Skype. Interviews with Kellogg tend to vary greatly based on who interviews you. You can expect anywhere from 6 to 14 Kellogg interview questions. Kellogg interviews are on the longer side, sometimes lasting an hour to an hour and a half. If you are interviewed by an alumni, typically they will have already read your resume but not your whole application. Below are the most common Kellogg interview questions, ranked from most to least common. Your chance of being asked each questions is in parenthesis.

Most Common Kellogg Interview Questions
  • Why Kellogg? (87%)
  • Why get an MBA? Why now? (87%)
  • What is your greatest accomplishment or what is the accomplishment you are most proud of? Sometimes when this question is asked, you are limited to an accomplishment at a certain company you worked at. (67%)
  • Walk me through your resume. (60%)
  • What will you contribute to the program? What will you get involved with at Kellogg? (60%)
  • Tell me about a time you faced a challenge. Frequently the interviewer asks specifically about a challenge or failure in a team environment. (53%)
  • What is your leadership style? (53%)
  • Tell me about your education. Why did you choose your major? (40%)
  • Is there anything else you would like me to know? (40%)
  • Why did you pick your company or industry? (27%)
  • What are your hobbies outside of work? (27%)
  • How would your coworkers or peers describe your strengths and weaknesses? (20%)
  • What role do you take within a team? (13%)
  • What inspires you? (13%)
  • What words would your classmates use to describe you? (13%)
  • Tell me about a time you took an initiative. (13%)
  • What are your long term goals? (13%)
You may also be asked specific questions about your resume or experiences. At the end you will have time to ask a few questions. For additional interview tips check out my MBA interview preparation guide. The questions for this article were collected from Clear Admit.

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Re: Calling all Kellogg Applicants (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!!   [#permalink] 26 Aug 2015, 00:17

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