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Company spokesperson: In lieu of redesigning our plants

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Manager
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Company spokesperson: In lieu of redesigning our plants  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2017, 07:10
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A
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  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

51% (01:51) correct 49% (01:39) wrong based on 140 sessions

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Company spokesperson: In lieu of redesigning our plants, our company recently launched an environmental protection campaign to buy and dispose of old cars, which are generally highly pollutive. Our plants account for just 4 percent of the local air pollution, while automobiles that predate 1980 account for 30 percent. Clearly, we will reduce air pollution more by buying old cars than we would by redesigning our plants.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the company spokesperson’s argument?


(A) Only 1 percent of the automobiles driven in the local area predate 1980.

(B) It would cost the company over $3 million to reduce its plants’ toxic emissions, while its car-buying campaign will save the company money by providing it with reusable scrap metal.

(C) Because the company pays only scrap metal prices for used cars, almost none of the cars sold to the company still run.

(D) Automobiles made after 1980 account for over 30 percent of local air pollution.

(E) Since the company launched its car-buying campaign, the number of citizen groups filing complaints about pollution from the company’s plants has decreased.

Source: LSAT
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New post 07 May 2017, 07:26
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C is a weakener ..It points that cars that Company will buy are not running anymore
.so it will not effect the cars that are currently on streets causing pollution.. ..

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Re: Company spokesperson: In lieu of redesigning our plants  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2017, 07:27
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ganand wrote:
Company spokesperson: In lieu of redesigning our plants, our company recently launched an environmental protection campaign to buy and dispose of old cars, which are generally highly pollutive. Our plants account for just 4 percent of the local air pollution, while automobiles that predate 1980 account for 30 percent. Clearly, we will reduce air pollution more by buying old cars than we would by redesigning our plants.

Which one of the following, if true, most seriously weakens the company spokesperson’s argument?


IMO, the answer is (C)

(A) Only 1 percent of the automobiles driven in the local area predate 1980. - It does not matter how many automobiles are driven predate 1980. No matter how few is the number of automobiles, it is given that they account for 30% of the pollution.

(B) It would cost the company over $3 million to reduce its plants’ toxic emissions, while its car-buying campaign will save the company money by providing it with reusable scrap metal. - This actually strengthens the argument.

(C) Because the company pays only scrap metal prices for used cars, almost none of the cars sold to the company still run. - The argument is air pollution can be reduced by buying the old cars and not by redesigning the plants. But, since the company pays only scrap metal prices for the used cars, we can say that almost none of those still run. Then how can they account for 30% of the pollution. This actually weakens the argument.

(D) Automobiles made after 1980 account for over 30 percent of local air pollution. - The argument is air pollution can be reduced by buying the old cars and not by redesigning the plants. So, automobiles made after 1980 are irrelevant here.

(E) Since the company launched its car-buying campaign, the number of citizen groups filing complaints about pollution from the company’s plants has decreased. _ The number of citizen groups filing complaints about pollution is out of context here.

Source: LSAT




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Re: Company spokesperson: In lieu of redesigning our plants  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2017, 20:34
I am sure that this question will never be chosen as one of questions that appear in the actual exam.
The source is from LSAT, so the pattern looks much different from a gmat question.
A is a trap.
both A and C use the same pattern that the cars bought by the company will have no effect on cars running on streets.
Re: Company spokesperson: In lieu of redesigning our plants &nbs [#permalink] 04 Dec 2017, 20:34
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