Summer is Coming! Join the Game of Timers Competition to Win Epic Prizes. Registration is Open. Game starts Mon July 1st.

It is currently 16 Jul 2019, 14:13

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 12 Mar 2010
Posts: 268
Concentration: Marketing, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 680 Q49 V34
In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Aug 2013, 07:40
3
39
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

42% (01:59) correct 58% (02:06) wrong based on 977 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics


In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwellings in several impoverished New York City neighbourhoods to investigate housing conditions and photograph immigrant tenant's apartments, whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.


(A) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect

(B) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and their walls were often lacking windows and dilapidated due to age and neglect

(C) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and they had walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect

(D) having interiors inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving for beds, and their walls were often windowless and dilapidated due to age and neglect

(E) having interiors that were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often lacked windows and were dilapidated on account of age and neglect
Most Helpful Community Reply
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 14 Jun 2011
Posts: 67
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Aug 2013, 11:32
19
5
A it is.

(A) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect - correct
(B) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded,their floors were often serving as beds, and their walls were often lacking windows and dilapidated due to age and neglect - the highlighted statement is an independent sentence and two independent sentence cannot be connected using just commas->creates a run on sentence.
(C) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and they had walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
- same error as B
(D) having interiors inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving for beds, and their walls were often windowless and dilapidated due to age and neglect
- changes the meaning. From the sentence it seems as if Jacob Riis had interiors when he started to visit
(E) having interiors that were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often lacked windows and were dilapidated on account of age and neglect - same as D
_________________
Kudos always encourages me
General Discussion
Retired Moderator
User avatar
Joined: 16 Jun 2012
Posts: 1004
Location: United States
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Aug 2013, 19:16
7
4
In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwellings in several impoverished New York City neighbourhoods to investigate housing conditions and photograph immigrant tenant's apartments, whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

(A) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
Correct. Modifier is used correctly.

(B) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and their walls were often lacking windows and dilapidated due to age and neglect
Wrong. information about the floors and walls just provides additional info for inhumanely overcrowded apartments' interiors ==> modifier should be used.

(C) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and they had walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
Wrong. Same as B.

(D) having interiors inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving for beds, and their walls were often windowless and dilapidated due to age and neglect
Wrong. Verb-ing modifier + comma ==> modify preceding clause. However, the underlined part just modifies "apartments".

(E) having interiors that were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often lacked windows and were dilapidated on account of age and neglect
Wrong. Same as D. Verb-ing modifier + comma ==> modify preceding clause. That's wrong here.

Hope it helps.
_________________
Please +1 KUDO if my post helps. Thank you.

"Designing cars consumes you; it has a hold on your spirit which is incredibly powerful. It's not something you can do part time, you have do it with all your heart and soul or you're going to get it wrong."

Chris Bangle - Former BMW Chief of Design.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 12 Mar 2010
Posts: 268
Concentration: Marketing, Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 680 Q49 V34
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Aug 2013, 21:50
Quote:
(B) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded,their floors were often serving as beds, and their walls were often lacking windows and dilapidated due to age and neglect - the highlighted statement is an independent sentence and two independent sentence cannot be connected using just commas->creates a run on sentence.


Thanks for the comment. Until now, I was thinking that if there is a sub-ordinate conjunction or a FANBOYS with a comma, then it has to join two Independent Clauses. Obviously, the reverse is also true. Thanks for the comment.

Do you have any official examples that have similarly designed options?
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 14 Jun 2011
Posts: 67
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Aug 2013, 02:24
1
Hi gmatter0913,

below is one of the examples from verbal review


However much United States voters may agree that there is waste in government and that the government as a whole spends beyond its means,it is difficult to find broad support for a movement toward a minimal state.

(A) However much United States voters may agree that
(B) Despite the agreement among United States voters to the fact
(C) Although United States voters agree
(D) Even though United States voters may agree
(E)There is agreement among United States voters that


Some days back i have mentioned about run-on sentences in a post. You can find it here -

http://gmatclub.com/forum/the-missouri-compromise-of-1820-a-legislative-effort-to-154841.html

One more example - the-iroquois-were-primarily-planters-but-supplementing-32790.html#p1259011


Please let me know if you have any doubts.
_________________
Kudos always encourages me
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 20 Oct 2015
Posts: 36
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Jul 2016, 03:21
swati007 wrote:
A it is.

(A) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect - correct
(B) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded,their floors were often serving as beds, and their walls were often lacking windows and dilapidated due to :?: :?: age and neglect - the highlighted statement is an independent sentence and two independent sentence cannot be connected using just commas->creates a run on sentence.
(C) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and they had walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
- same error as B
(D) having interiors inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving for beds, and their walls were often windowless and dilapidated due to :?: :?: age and neglect
- changes the meaning. From the sentence it seems as if Jacob Riis had interiors when he started to visit
(E) having interiors that were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often lacked windows and were dilapidated on account of age and neglect - same as D



just look for parallelism x,y and z

x=whose interior.....,their walls........ and their floors...
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2014
Posts: 20
Location: India
Schools: XLRI GM"18 (M)
GMAT 1: 680 Q48 V34
GPA: 3.83
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2016, 05:28
pqhai wrote:
In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwellings in several impoverished New York City neighbourhoods to investigate housing conditions and photograph immigrant tenant's apartments, whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

(A) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
Correct. Modifier is used correctly.

(B) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and their walls were often lacking windows and dilapidated due to age and neglect
Wrong. information about the floors and walls just provides additional info for inhumanely overcrowded apartments' interiors ==> modifier should be used.

(C) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and they had walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
Wrong. Same as B.

(D) having interiors inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving for beds, and their walls were often windowless and dilapidated due to age and neglect
Wrong. Verb-ing modifier + comma ==> modify preceding clause. However, the underlined part just modifies "apartments".

(E) having interiors that were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often lacked windows and were dilapidated on account of age and neglect
Wrong. Same as D. Verb-ing modifier + comma ==> modify preceding clause. That's wrong here.

Hope it helps.


Just one question.
In option A, isnt there a parallelism error-

whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect

1 is in Verb-ed form other is in verb-ing form
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Status: In the realms of Chaos & Night
Joined: 13 Sep 2015
Posts: 149
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2016, 11:28
In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwellings in several impoverished New York City neighbourhoods to investigate housing conditions and photograph immigrant tenant's apartments, whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

(A) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect - Correct.

(B) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and their walls were often lacking windows and dilapidated due to age and neglect
(C) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and they had walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
(D) having interiors inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving for beds, and their walls were often windowless and dilapidated due to age and neglect
(E) having interiors that were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often lacked windows and were dilapidated on account of age and neglect
_________________
Good luck
=========================================================================================
"If a street performer makes you stop walking, you owe him a buck"
"If this post helps you on your GMAT journey, drop a +1 Kudo "


"Thursdays with Ron - Consolidated Verbal Master List - Updated"
Retired Moderator
User avatar
S
Joined: 14 Dec 2013
Posts: 2870
Location: Germany
Schools: German MBA
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V47
WE: Corporate Finance (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jul 2016, 02:59
2
gaurav2187 wrote:
pqhai wrote:
In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwellings in several impoverished New York City neighbourhoods to investigate housing conditions and photograph immigrant tenant's apartments, whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

(A) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
Correct. Modifier is used correctly.

(B) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and their walls were often lacking windows and dilapidated due to age and neglect
Wrong. information about the floors and walls just provides additional info for inhumanely overcrowded apartments' interiors ==> modifier should be used.

(C) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and they had walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
Wrong. Same as B.

(D) having interiors inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving for beds, and their walls were often windowless and dilapidated due to age and neglect
Wrong. Verb-ing modifier + comma ==> modify preceding clause. However, the underlined part just modifies "apartments".

(E) having interiors that were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often lacked windows and were dilapidated on account of age and neglect
Wrong. Same as D. Verb-ing modifier + comma ==> modify preceding clause. That's wrong here.

Hope it helps.


Just one question.
In option A, isnt there a parallelism error-

whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect

1 is in Verb-ed form other is in verb-ing form


The first modifier (relative clause modifier) is not supposed to be parallel to the second and the third (absolute phrases).

Relative phrase modifier: whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded
Absolute phrase 1: their floors often serving as beds
Absolute phrase 2: their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

There is no bearing of "overcrowded" with "serving" since they are in two different elements which has no parallelity requirement.

The only parallelity requirement is within the absolute phrase 1 and the absolute phrase 2, and they are parallel (noun + noun modifier)

Absolute phrase 1: Noun = their floors, noun modifier (present participle) = (often) serving as beds
Absolute phrase 2: Noun = their walls, noun modifier (adjectival) = windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

The only requirement here is that "their walls" and "their walls" be parallel. (Even the noun modifiers in two differnet absolute phrases need not be parallel.)
Current Student
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Jul 2016
Posts: 77
Location: United States (MI)
GMAT 1: 730 Q51 V40
GPA: 3.6
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Aug 2016, 12:25
Can something get dilapidated with age? I thought something can get dilapidated only due to something. I chose 'B', even though I understand that there is a parallelism error, because of the above logic, B seemed the most appropriate
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 16 Mar 2016
Posts: 66
Schools: Tuck '19
GMAT 1: 660 Q48 V33
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V35
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Aug 2016, 12:43
pqhai wrote:
In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwellings in several impoverished New York City neighbourhoods to investigate housing conditions and photograph immigrant tenant's apartments, whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

(A) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
Correct. Modifier is used correctly.

(B) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and their walls were often lacking windows and dilapidated due to age and neglect
Wrong. information about the floors and walls just provides additional info for inhumanely overcrowded apartments' interiors ==> modifier should be used.

(C) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and they had walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
Wrong. Same as B.

(D) having interiors inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving for beds, and their walls were often windowless and dilapidated due to age and neglect
Wrong. Verb-ing modifier + comma ==> modify preceding clause. However, the underlined part just modifies "apartments".

(E) having interiors that were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often lacked windows and were dilapidated on account of age and neglect
Wrong. Same as D. Verb-ing modifier + comma ==> modify preceding clause. That's wrong here.

Hope it helps.



Dear Concerned,

Can you please elaborate a little more on how modifiers related to 'floors' and 'windows' are providing additional info about apartment's interiors? Does 'their' in these modifiers refer to interiors? As in, "apartment's interior's floors often serving as beds" and "apartment's interior's walls often lacking windows and dilapidated due to age and neglect"? Is this correct? To me it seems these modifiers will make more sense if they modify 'apartment'.
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 09 Oct 2014
Posts: 19
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Sep 2017, 05:56
I opted for B. Can someone please help me understand why is B incorrrect
_________________
Appreciate my post with Kudos if it is helpful :thumbup:
All the best for your prep :)
Retired Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 22 Jun 2014
Posts: 1102
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Technology
GMAT 1: 540 Q45 V20
GPA: 2.49
WE: Information Technology (Computer Software)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Sep 2017, 07:52
Khuranasup wrote:
I opted for B. Can someone please help me understand why is B incorrrect


Hi Khuranasup,

1. Parallelism at issue:

Whose interiors were...., their floors were..., and their walls were -- this is not parallel. It should be written like this:
Whose interiors were...., Whose floors were..., and Whose walls were

2. Wrong use of due to. Replacement of "due to" by "CAUSED BY" does not make sense.

their walls were dilapidated due to age.
their walls were dilapidated CAUSED BY age
_________________
Current Student
avatar
B
Joined: 30 Aug 2017
Posts: 13
Location: India
Schools: ISB '19 (A)
GMAT 1: 670 Q47 V35
GPA: 3.9
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2017, 20:59
1
Can Whose be used to modify a non-living thing like appartments?
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 26 Mar 2016
Posts: 60
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, General Management
GMAT 1: 720 Q50 V36
GRE 1: Q166 V147
GPA: 3.3
WE: Other (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Sep 2017, 22:20
3
tejas0999 wrote:
Can Whose be used to modify a non-living thing like appartments?


Yes, Whose can be used for persons, things


Below is the general list

to refer People -- who , whom , whose
to refer Things -- whose, which , that

Let me know in case any further info needed


If it helps... Kudos :) please
_________________
23 Kudos left to unlock next level. Help me by Contributing one for cause :) .. Please

My failed GMAT experience ... https://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-bad-experience-640-need-suggestions-on-verbal-improvement-251308.html

My review on EmpowerGMAT : https://gmatclub.com/reviews/comments/empowergmat-online-course-345355767
CR & LSAT Forum Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: He came. He saw. He conquered. -- Studying for the LSAT -- Corruptus in Extremis
Joined: 31 Jul 2017
Posts: 661
Location: United States (MA)
Concentration: Finance, Economics
Reviews Badge
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Oct 2017, 06:03
1
Bharath99 wrote:
tejas0999 wrote:
Can Whose be used to modify a non-living thing like appartments?


Yes, Whose can be used for persons, things


Below is the general list

to refer People -- who , whom , whose
to refer Things -- whose, which , that

Let me know in case any further info needed


If it helps... Kudos :) please


Hi Bharath99,

Be careful when you make general statements like this. Whose can refer to a house, but only if it shows possession. In this case, it does. But 'whose' is not always appropriate when talking about inanimate objects.
_________________
D-Day: November 18th, 2017

My CR Guide: https://gmatclub.com/forum/mod-nightblade-s-quick-guide-to-proficiency-cr-295316.html

Want to be a moderator? We may want you to be one! See how here: https://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-club-moderators-directory-253455.html

Need a laugh and a break? Go here: https://gmatclub.com/forum/mental-break-funny-videos-270269.html

Need a CR tutor? PM me!
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 25 Dec 2017
Posts: 4
Premium Member
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Sep 2018, 01:39
sayantanc2k wrote:
gaurav2187 wrote:
pqhai wrote:
In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwellings in several impoverished New York City neighbourhoods to investigate housing conditions and photograph immigrant tenant's apartments, whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

(A) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
Correct. Modifier is used correctly.

(B) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and their walls were often lacking windows and dilapidated due to age and neglect
Wrong. information about the floors and walls just provides additional info for inhumanely overcrowded apartments' interiors ==> modifier should be used.

(C) whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors were often serving as beds, and they had walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect
Wrong. Same as B.

(D) having interiors inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving for beds, and their walls were often windowless and dilapidated due to age and neglect
Wrong. Verb-ing modifier + comma ==> modify preceding clause. However, the underlined part just modifies "apartments".

(E) having interiors that were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often lacked windows and were dilapidated on account of age and neglect
Wrong. Same as D. Verb-ing modifier + comma ==> modify preceding clause. That's wrong here.

Hope it helps.


Just one question.
In option A, isnt there a parallelism error-

whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect

1 is in Verb-ed form other is in verb-ing form


The first modifier (relative clause modifier) is not supposed to be parallel to the second and the third (absolute phrases).

Relative phrase modifier: whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded
Absolute phrase 1: their floors often serving as beds
Absolute phrase 2: their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

There is no bearing of "overcrowded" with "serving" since they are in two different elements which has no parallelity requirement.

The only parallelity requirement is within the absolute phrase 1 and the absolute phrase 2, and they are parallel (noun + noun modifier)

Absolute phrase 1: Noun = their floors, noun modifier (present participle) = (often) serving as beds
Absolute phrase 2: Noun = their walls, noun modifier (adjectival) = windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

The only requirement here is that "their walls" and "their walls" be parallel. (Even the noun modifiers in two differnet absolute phrases need not be parallel.)


Hi sayantanc2k,

Could you please share how do you usually recognize Absolute phrase in a sentence?

I thought that Absolute phrase has only 3 distinctive features:
1) the phrase structure can be: noun + participle (phrase)
2) or can be: noun + "that" clause
3) Absolute phrases modify the entire sentence

But here the Absolute phrases modify "tenant's apartments" but not the main noun of the sentence, and the structures are not very clear.

Please help. Thank you very much in advance!
Director
Director
User avatar
D
Joined: 08 Jun 2013
Posts: 560
Location: France
Schools: INSEAD Jan '19
GMAT 1: 200 Q1 V1
GPA: 3.82
WE: Consulting (Other)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Sep 2018, 10:23
Though this sentence is long and not necessarily in your favorite style, there is nothing grammatically wrong with it.

Stripped way down, the last part of this sentence would read: "The interiors were overcrowded, their floors serving as beds and their walls windowless." The last two phrases modify the interiors, giving more information about the insides of these apartments. Joined by "and," they must be parallel to each other.

It may seem odd, but here the word "serving" in the phrase "their floors often serving as beds" actually functions as an adjective. This is fairly common, however. For example, in the sentence "She ran for the bus, shouting, and finally caught it," the verbs "ran" and "caught" are parallel, while the word "shouting" functions as an adjective, describing what she was like while "she ran for the bus." Thus, each of these modifying phrases is noun + adjective, and they are parallel in construction.

Since there is nothing wrong with this sentence, just check each of the other choices to see if any of them is better stylistically.

Scan and Group the Answer Choices:

There is a clear and useful 3-2 split here. (A), (B) and (C) all begin "whose interiors were" and (D) and (E) both begin with "having interiors."

Eliminate Wrong Answer Choices:

(D) and (E) both begin with the word "having," which is incorrect, because it isn't clear who or what has these interiors. Is it the apartments, the immigrants, or Jacob Riis? Such ambiguity is unacceptable, which is enough reason to rule out these two choices. Further, (D) changes "dilapidated with age" to "dilapidated due to age," and (E) changes it to "dilapidated on account of age." Both are wordier than the original. In fact, the phrase "on account of" is usually wrong on the GMAT. So, both (D) and (E) are incorrect.

(B) makes several small changes from the original. First, it changes "floors often serving" to "floors were often serving." This small change has big implications. Without the word "were," the phrase "their floors often serving as beds" is a descriptive aside. With "were," this is an independent clause (it could stand on its own), so it would at the very least have to be parallel with the preceding clause, making a list with it. However, it isn't parallel; to be parallel, it would have to read, "whose floors served as beds." (B) also inserts the word "were" in the last clause, which creates exactly the same problem there. Finally, it unnecessarily changes the phrase "dilapidated with" to "dilapidated due to." "With" is fine, so there's no reason to make the phrase any longer. Because of these problems, (B) is incorrect.

(C) also creates an unparallel list. To be parallel, the second and third clause would have to begin "whose walls" and "whose floors."

Since each of the other choices introduces new errors, the sentence is correct as written and Answer Choice (A) is correct.
_________________
Everything will fall into place…

There is perfect timing for
everything and everyone.
Never doubt, But Work on
improving yourself,
Keep the faith and
Stay ready. When it’s
finally your turn,
It will all make sense.
Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 22 Jun 2017
Posts: 178
Location: Argentina
Schools: HBS, Stanford, Wharton
GMAT 1: 630 Q43 V34
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Feb 2019, 14:58
Are the possesive pronouns "their" correct in this sentence? aren't they ambiguos?
_________________
The HARDER you work, the LUCKIER you get.
Target Test Prep Representative
User avatar
P
Status: Chief Curriculum and Content Architect
Affiliations: Target Test Prep
Joined: 24 Nov 2014
Posts: 552
GMAT 1: 800 Q51 V51
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Feb 2019, 18:15
1
patto wrote:
Are the possesive pronouns "their" correct in this sentence? aren't they ambiguos?

Here's the correct version.

In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwellings in several impoverished New York City neighbourhoods to investigate housing conditions and photograph immigrant tenant's apartments, whose interiors were inhumanely overcrowded, their floors often serving as beds, and their walls often windowless and dilapidated with age and neglect.

"Their" would not refer to "neighborhoods" or "conditions," because neither neighborhoods nor conditions would have floors or walls described as these floor and walls are.

"Their" probably does not refer to "tenants'," as tenants probably would not be the ones that have floors and walls.

Regarding the other two nearby plural nouns, "apartments" and "interiors," there is no clear way to determine with a reasonable degree of certainty which of these nouns "their" refers to, as both apartments and interiors could have floors and walls. So, yes, which noun "their" refers to is ambiguous.
_________________

Marty Murray

Chief Curriculum and Content Architect

Marty@targettestprep.com
TTP - Target Test Prep Logo
122 Reviews

5-star rated online GMAT quant
self study course

See why Target Test Prep is the top rated GMAT quant course on GMAT Club. Read Our Reviews

If you find one of my posts helpful, please take a moment to click on the "Kudos" button.

GMAT Club Bot
Re: In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling   [#permalink] 22 Feb 2019, 18:15
Display posts from previous: Sort by

In the late 1880s, the journalist Jacob Riis visited tenement dwelling

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne